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Audi 100 Avant

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Audi 100 Avant - information: Audi 100 Avant is a very good car, that was released by "Audi" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Audi 100 Avant on this page.

Brand Name Audi
Model Audi 100 Avant
Number of views 108918 views
Model's Rate 9.3 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
  • MAZDA news.

    Already installed under the bonnets of the Mazda2 and CX-3, the Japanese firm has now begun selling versions of the Mazda3 with the 103bhp 1.5-litre diesel engine. For the first time, Mazda’s medium-sized car is capable of emitting less than 100g/km of CO2, with the new powerplant achieving 74.3mpg and emissions of just 99g/km. It’s offered with both five-door hatchback and four-door Fastback bodystyles, and the choice of manual or automatic transmission - the latter exclusive to hatchback editions. The new engine is capable of achieving a maximum speed of 116mph and accelerates to 62mph in 11.0 seconds. Maximum torque of 199lb ft is produced between 1,600 and 2,500rpm. Available in each of the five trim levels - SE, SE Nav, SE-L, SE-L Nav and Sport Nav - prices start at Ј18,895 for the SE 1.5-litre diesel hatchback and Fastback, while the flagship of the line-up, the Sport Nav 1.5 diesel automatic hatchback is priced at Ј23,145. On sale since 1st December, the first examples are arriving in UK showrooms about now.
  • Life in the old dog yet....

    It might not be as light on its feet as its newer rivals, but Yam’s smooth, secure, comfy FJR1300 is still a valid tourer. Updates a couple of years back - multi-function dash, flashy finish, better suspension, high-tech options - added class, and for ’16 there’s more refinement. It’s got a six-speed gearbox at last, for both better acceleration and more relaxed cruising, plus an ‘assist and slipper’ clutch based on the R1’s system. Got LED lights too and a matt silver paint option, plus AE/AS versions have cornering lights.
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