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Büssing-N.A.G. Einheits-Diesel

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Büssing-N.A.G. Einheits-Diesel - information: Büssing-N.A.G. Einheits-Diesel is a very good car, that was released by "Büssing-N.A.G." company. We collected the best 9 photos of Büssing-N.A.G. Einheits-Diesel on this page.

Brand Name Büssing-N.A.G.
Model Büssing-N.A.G. Einheits-Diesel
Number of views 74580 views
Model's Rate 5.6 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • Holden’s secret project.

    MEET the top-secret show-stopper that started life in Holden’s Port Melbourne design studios in the middle of 2015. The eye-catching Opel GT Concept, which is shaping up to be one of the stars of the Geneva motor show (March 3-13), was designed in Europe but is a product of Holden’s secret fabrication group, one of only two in the General Motors world that can create one-off show stars. The radical two-door coupe sits on a unique rear-drive platform that gives it the driver-focused nous to take on the COTY-winning Mazda MX-5 and 2012 winners the Toyota 86/Subaru BRZ twins. Described as a “template for future sports cars”, the GT Concept from GM’s European brands is targeted to weigh less than 1000kg. It’s built on a bespoke reardrive platform and uses GM’s new all-aluminium 1.0-litre three-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine, producing 107kW and 205Nm. It drives through a sixspeed sequential gearbox and accelerates to 100km/h in “under eight seconds” on the way to a maximum of 215km/h. The unusual styling is described by GM Europe design chief Mark Adams as “purebred, pared down, yet unashamedly avant-garde”. “It is dramatic, sculptural and full of innovations, which is our great tradition that we intend to continue,” Adams said. “In the mid-60s Vauxhall and Opel created their own interpretations of a lightweight sports car - the XVR and the Experimental GT - both of which were thoroughly modern with dynamic sculptural form.” While a rear-drive platform under the concept would be crucial to the production GT’s ability to battle rivals like the Toyota 86 and Mazda MX-5, GM Europe sources say it’s unlikely, and that the Barina/Corsa FWD architecture makes more business sense. The company hopes to gather more market intelligence after the GT is unveiled at the Geneva show. One insider said the GT Concept shows the company’s direction: “Like the new (European) Astra, this car continues with the theme of making a car that is no bigger than it needs to be. One that is pared-down, light and no more complex than necessary.” As for a Holden version of the production car? It’s possible, especially if the GT gets the green light for sale in the UK. But the little concept car that Australia built still has a number of gates to clear before those negotiations can take place.
  • DUCATI 1299 PANIGALES.

    I missed the opportunity to test the regular Ducati 1299 Panigale earlier in the year but first impressions of the 1299 Panigale S are very positive. Jumping on, the bike is tall with an easy reach to the ground even for my 180cm height, reach to the bars is aggressive and the pegs are relatively tall. Taking the Panigale S through my usual testing route the first thing that impressed me was just how planted the bike is, even over relatively poor road surfaces the bike just feels like it’s glued to the road, with great feel front and rear. It’s still very firm, but the semiactive mode takes the bite out of the bumps and as a result the real kick experienced in the old 1199 that was so punishing, to your bum, spine and kidneys, is gone. The S is quite agile, with neutral steering that doesn’t exactly require muscling but does require concentration and thought about where you want to go. Changing your line mid-corner is easy and it really does feel like you’re on rails, regardless of your speed. I’d say it’s similar to the 899 Panigale, on which you don’t notice the effort that goes into handling until you jump on something that feels noticeably quicker steering. That’s not a criticism though, just an observation. The Brembo EVO M50 brake calipers on the front are also extremely strong, not in an off-putting fashion but I did find it easier to use the awesome Ducati Quick Shifter with auto-blipper to drop down a gear to wash off some speed. Talking of power the engine is a belter, down low the 1285cc L-twin is lumpy and you can just about roll along at 19km/h in first without clutch but it’s not pleasant, but that does smooth out rapidly as you reach higher into the revs. The fueling and throttle response are both super smooth and responsive, with Sport providing a smoother power delivery and throttle response than Race and power is just explosive. It’s also seriously loud with the two-into-two system with the stock stainless mufflers in the belly and I thought I might pop an eardrum when I rode into our underground garage a bit too vigorously! What did stand out is just how heavy the clutch lever is, it felt like fighting a bear trap when I got caught in really heavy traffic and was having to use it frequently. The DQS on the other hand means that in anything except stop-start traffic you aren’t using the clutch constantly. The Panigale 1299 S certainly has the goods to justify a model suffix, with its full LED lighting, carbon-fibre front guard and auxiliary adjustment buttons adding to the awesome Panigale package. But what really conveys the value of the premium price of $34,990 plus on roads is the full Ohlins suspension, using the Ohlins Smart EC semi-active suspension system for both the NIX30 forks and TTX36 rear shock, as well as an Ohlins steering damper, while further communicating with the Bosch Inertia Platform - which provides cornering ABS and greater traction control refinement. Not only this but the system can actually be run in Fixed mode, which turns off the semiactive suspension and allows full adjustability, just like in a traditional system.
  • DS 4.

    Little more than a year after Citroen announced that it would be spinning off its DS cars into a separate luxury subbrand, the French firm has facelifted half of its line-up, with both the DS 4 and flagship DS 5 sporting the company’s new corporate nose treatment. The rest of the range, namely the DS 3 supermini and Cabrio, will get an update within weeks, adopting a similarly bold front end that will also see the end of the double chevrons adorning the car, as has been done with the DS 4 and DS 5. While the UK is the biggest single market for the DS 3, there’s still some work to be done on the rest of the range, but the newly formed firm is hoping that revisions to the DS 4, including a realignment of its market positioning will transform sales. DS Automobiles is looking to attract two different sets of buyers for the newly revised DS 4, with the regular DS 4 riding lower compared to before, while the new Crossback model is aimed at the crossover market thanks to its raised ride height of 30 millimetres, and more rugged, off-road inspired styling cues. At the car’s international launch a couple of months ago, we focused upon the DS 4 Crossback edition, but now with the first examples arriving in UK showrooms, we were able to spend time behind the wheel of the DS 4 Prestige, paired to the flagship 178bhp BlueHDi engine. One of the biggest criticisms of the outgoing DS 4 was its unyielding ride and we’re pleased to say that ride comfort has been transformed on the new car. Deep ruts and potholes are tackled with ease, and there’s no need to brace yourself like you needed to do with the old car. Steering feel is particularly agile with lots of feel, with the DS 4 asserting itself as being different from the humdrum hatchback segment. Through the bends there’s minimal body lean and a decent amount of grip, inspiring confidence in more challenging corners. While it doesn’t offer the same kind of driver satisfaction as Ford’s Focus, there’s reasonable agility and the experience is reassuringly safe and predictable. The engine is quiet and refined, only becoming heard when you really gun the right hand pedal, and while there’s a fair amount of road noise on noisier surfaces, wind noise isn’t intrusive. Away from the lights there’s decent pace, with smooth gearshifts from the six-speed automatic transmission. The brakes deliver good bite, though beware if you have anything larger than average sized feet, as the space in the foot well is at a premium. There’s very little room between the centre console and the clutch pedal on manual gearbox variants, and it’s all too easy to get your size tens stuck uncomfortably, and then there’s a mad scramble to get the clutch down in time for you to stop. It’s a good reason why you’re better off opting for the automatic variants in preference to the manual versions. Apart from revisions to the dashboard to incorporate a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, and the first time that Apple CarPlay has been seen in a PSA Peugeot-Citroen-DS product, it’s business as usual. So that means a nicely appointed cabin with surfaces that are a cut above the norm in the medium car segment. The trademark DS watchstrap-inspired leather upholstery is on offer and looks sensational. There’s squidgy materials used for the dashboard, but disappointingly the door tops are hard plastic unless you opt for the uprated leather trim. The instruments where you can change the backlighting are a nice touch, and all of the controls are neatly positioned up high for ease of use. You’ll need to be a contortionist to use the USB socket, or have small hands, though, because it’s awkwardly positioned on the centre console. And that’s particularly disappointing as the use of Apple’s CarPlay depends on you being able to plug in your iPhone via the USB socket. The newly introduced touchscreen is easy to use and nicely positioned just within your field of vision. While it isn’t the most responsive system around, it’s certainly no better or worse than some rival systems. Our test car came equipped with the distinctive watchstrap upholstery and comfort and lateral support is simply excellent. It’s also easy to adjust the seats to gain a good position, though the steering wheel always feels like it is positioned too close. Space up front is pretty good, apart from the aforementioned pedal problems, while at the rear there’s surprisingly more space than you expect. Once installed in the back, knee and headroom is actually alright, though it can be a bit of challenge to get in and out. Those shapely styled rear doors come to a point, and if you’re not careful you could do someone a mischief. Space around the cabin for oddments is generally good, with a decent-sized tray in front of the gear lever and well-proportioned door pockets. While vision out of the front of the car is good, thick rear pillars and a shallow rear window make manoeuvring more of a challenge. It’s therefore pleasing that all DS 4s come with rear parking sensors for added reassurance. Boot space is well proportioned at 385 litres, though you’ll have to get over the high sill first. The optional Denon audio system restricts space a little, but the seats are easy to fold down with the pull of a lever. With the launch of the new DS 4, prices have increased a notch due to realignment of the model range. Where the previous DSign model offered an attractive entry price to DS 4 ownership, it wasn’t particularly well equipped, something you can’t level at all models of this latest DS 4 range. For instance, all versions come with DAB digital radio, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, dual-zone climate control, rear privacy glass, cruise control and automatic headlights and wipers.
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