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Benetton B193

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Benetton B193 - information: Benetton B193 is a very good car, that was released by "Benetton" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Benetton B193 on this page.

Brand Name Benetton
Model Benetton B193
Number of views 92339 views
Model's Rate 5.4 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Nissan NP300 Navara.

    Pickups are at the brawny end of the car scene, utility vehicles that used to have a rough and ready image, and the structure and driving characteristics to match. In recent times they have become a lot more civilised, with big advances in creature comfort and road-going behaviour. The latest of the breed, Nissan’s new NP300 Navara - the NP stands for Nissan Pickup - is a very good example of how far down that road pickups have progressed. It is a big vehicle at five and a half metres long, and its elevated chassis means that you still need to be a tall, strong bloke to enter the cab with ease: it’s rather a physical upward haul for those of us more vertically challenged. But once installed it’s something of a revelation. All the controls are pleasantly weighted and you don’t need beefy muscles to drive this latest generation of Navara. It has undergone a mechanical transformation, with the rather rustic leafspring suspension of the previous model now replaced by more sophisticated coil springs, while the previous 2.5-litre dCi engine has been superseded by a more efficient 2.3-litre dCi unit with either 161 or 188bhp power outputs. Both changes bring big benefits. The new Navara has taut and tidy handling, but without undue body lean, and it also rides impressively well with some of the most cushioned comfort of any of the current crop of modern pickups. Strong performance doesn’t come with a noise penalty, and refinement is very good indeed for a vehicle of this type. Gearbox choice is six-speed manual or a seven-speed automatic transmission, and both have well-spaced ratios and a slick action. There are two body styles, the King Cab that is popular in some other markets, with shorter, rear-opening back doors and a basic bench back seat, and the Double Cab that is generally preferred here in the UK and has four full-size conventional doors and fully comfortable back seats. There is nothing rustic about interior comfort, it is on a par with a well-appointed five-seater family hatchback. It’s amply spacious and not cramped. Cabin quality has taken a quantum leap forward over the old model, with tactile materials, an elegantly styled dashboard layout and a level of fit and finish that would not disgrace a prestige-nudging saloon. Large door pockets, some well-placed central cubbyholes and a handy dashboard-top tray means there are enough places to put all your on-the-move oddments. There are five grades of trim, starting with Visia and rising through Acenta, Acenta+, N-Connecta and topping out with Tekna. All versions come with a fair level of standard kit, including Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity, electric windows, cruise control, automatic headlights, electric door mirrors, LED rear lights, and air conditioning on all four-wheel-drive models. Move up the range to Acenta trim and 16-inch alloy wheels are fitted, as well as keyless entry and start and chrome embellishments. Acenta+ versions feature 18-inch alloy wheels, climate control, rear privacy glass, reversing camera, front fog lights, leather steering wheel and gearknob, as well as heated door mirrors with power folding. In N-Connecta trim, as tested, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system is included, and there’s DAB digital radio and Bluetooth audio streaming, while choosing Tekna versions includes leather upholstery, roof rails, LED headlights and daytime running lights, rear parking sensors, a 360 degree camera system and heated and electric driver’s seat. A rear differential lock is optional on all models except the entrylevel Visia trim, while an electric sunroof is available on Tekna versions at extra cost. The new NP300 Navara shows how far pickups have come in recent years. From the outside this is still a large, beefy workhorse, albeit one with sleeker curves than before. From the inside, and in its driving manners, you could think yourself at the wheel of an upper-crust SUV. Nissan has done a good job of significantly upping its game with this one.
  • Dragster RR LH44.

    The Dragster RR LH44 is the second new model for 2016 from Schiranna. MV Agusta claim this is a truly exclusive machine inspired by F1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton’s passion for MV Agusta. The Mercedes AMG Petronas driver collaborated with the MV Agusta designers, contributing to the definition of over 50 design details to make the LH44 stand out from the standard Dragster RR. Most of these changes are manufactured in Ergal and carbon-fibre with a 3K opaque finish. In terms of graphics, the LH44 was inspired by the graphics on the threetime world champion’s helmet and features a white colour scheme and the panther logo, which is also sewn into the quiltfinish Alcantara saddle. Needless to say, Lewis’s number 44 features on the exhaust manifolds and autographed screen. Production will be limited to 244 bikes.
  • MAKE MINE A “SUPERMID”.

    Just as it did in 2015 with the 1299 Panigale, Ducati has upped the ante in 2016 with the smaller Panigale, giving the previous 899 the same stroke measurement as the 1299 to create the new 959 Panigale. Ducati wanted to ensure that the “supermid” Panigale kept pace with its bigger brother, so it invited the world’s motorcycling media to the Circuit de la Comunitat Valenciana Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, to let us find out. Looking at the updates, they are minimal but important, with the engine’s slight increase in stroke from 57.2mm to 60.8mm (resulting in a total displacement of 955cc) necessitating a new crankshaft and connecting rods. The piston crowns are slightly different, while strict Euro 4 noise emissions standards required the fitment of a different exhaust system with dual muffl ers on the right side (thankfully absent from US models), along with ribbing on the cylinder heads and valve covers, and a different cam chain. Exhaust diameter was increased from 55mm to 60mm, while on the intake side, the 62mm oval throttle bodies now feature dual injectors. The clutch now has the slipper/assist function from the 1299 that provides lighter lever action and smoother downshifting when riding aggressively. Meanwhile, thanks to the bike employing the same cast-aluminum monocoque two-piece frame that uses the engine as a structural member, changes on the chassis side are limited to dropping the swingarm pivot 4mm for better rear-tire grip. I had spent a couple of days on an 899 Panigale last year at Circuit of The Americas in Texas, so I had a good idea of what to compare the 959 to. It didn’t take me long to realize that the 959 has power all over the 899 regardless-and not only more of it through the rpm range but smoother power, too, with fewer dips and bumps in the powerband. Ducati claims 157 hp, an increase of 9 hp from the 899’s 148 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a torque peak of 79 foot-pounds (a massive 6 foot-pound increase over the 899) at 9,000 rpm. The same Ducati electronics suite of RbW (Ride-by-Wire), DTC (Ducati Traction Control), EBC (Engine Brake Control), DQS (Ducati Quickshift), and Bosch ABS does an excellent job of keeping everything under control. With the DTC set to Level 2 in the Race riding mode, the new 959 Panigale comes off the corners well and continues pulling hard as the rpm rises. I did find, however, that you need to exercise some care in Race mode when opening the throttle midcorner, as the 959’s increased and more responsive torque can come on a little abruptly. If anything, it’s more of an annoyance, really, and it’s very manageable; you just have to be aware of it. The Sport mode throttle response is softer (with the rain-intended Wet mode softer still) and perhaps a little too soft for the track, which is why I left it in Race mode for the majority of my laps. Setting the EBC at Level 1 (the least enginebraking) with the slipper clutch was a big help under braking, allowing the rear end to step out just enough while hammering downshifts to aid but not interfere with corner entry. And speaking of braking, the feel and control provided by the Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers and 320mm discs were outstanding, allowing trail braking deep into the corner without issues. The fully adjustable Showa 43mm Big Piston Fork offered a very solid feel in all conditions, and while the fully adjustable Sachs rear shock performed admirably, I was wishing for a slightly stiffer spring in the back to counter some squatting under acceleration. Midcorner stability was rock-solid, and although initial turn-in at speed took some effort (a likely by-product of the rear-end squat), overall steering habits were light and agile- the 959’s 430-pound wet weight surely helping matters here. The taller and wider windscreen definitely helps keep the windblast off you down long front straights better than its comparatively skimpy predecessor. And you can move around easily on the bike, aided by the same knurled footpegs found on the 1299 that grip your boots far better than the previously useless pegs found on generations of Ducatis that were only good to rest your feet on when cruising in a straight line. All told, boosting the displacement and adding subtle tweaks to its “Supermid” superquadro engine has yielded great results with the new 959 Panigale. This is the type of bike you can really feel like you’re squeezing all the potential out of, instead of the 1299 Panigale where at times you feel like you’re only along for the ride. Yeah, calling a bike with a 955cc engine a midsize machine is a bit of a stretch, but after a ride on the 959 Panigale, you probably won’t care one bit.
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