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Borgward B 2000 A/O

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Borgward B 2000 A/O - information: Borgward B 2000 A/O is a very good car, that was released by "Borgward" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Borgward B 2000 A/O on this page.

Brand Name Borgward
Model Borgward B 2000 A/O
Number of views 45829 views
Model's Rate 9.1 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • China the key to Avista’s future.

    THE future of Buick’s gorgeous Avista concept - and a Holdenbadged version - lies in two extra doors, according to General Motors insiders Wheels spoke to following the car’s Detroit motor show debut. Sources confirmed that a model of a four-door version exists in the GM styling studio and is under serious consideration following its overwhelmingly positive reaction as the star of the show. GM has started work on making a business case for building the car, and a Holden-badged version - including a higher-output HSV model - could be in the mix. GM sources hint the production Avista would likely end up being a four-door coupe designed as a more affordable rival to the Mercedes-Benz CLS, BMW 6 Series Gran Coupe and Audi A7 Sportback. While Buick last year showed off a four-door concept - the Australian-designed Avenir - the four-door Avista coupe would be smaller and sleeker, with more emphasis on proportions and design than rear seat space. The challenge for securing an Avista business case is ensuring enough global demand, and once again right-hand drive production is the big question mark. In the global automotive game, Buick (which sells only in China and North America) tends to fly under the radar. But with sales of 1.25 million vehicles last year - the highest in Buick’s 112 years - it is GM’s second best-selling brand worldwide after Chevrolet. Put that down to China, where it’s the country’s number two brand. China accounts for about 80 percent of total Buick sales, and therefore holds the key to any decision to produce Avista. Although Chinese consumers do not currently buy coupes in significant numbers, Buick and GMC vice-president Duncan Aldred doesn’t necessarily see that as a roadblock to Avista getting the green light for production. “I think we’ve earned the right to have the halo car in the Buick range,” Aldred says. “We’re the premium mainstream brand in China, and there’s great value in us continuing to stretch the brand upwards, even though it may not be massive volume.” “China is important to any Buick,” admits GM design chief Ed Welburn, who says GM’s Chinese product planners have seen the car. While China is now a massive SUV market, Welburn makes the point that Chinese consumers suddenly switched from buying sedans three years ago. “A coupe might be the next big thing.” The Avista concept is based on a mash-up of GM Alpha and Omega components, sharing the Alpha-based Chevrolet Camaro coupe’s 2811mm wheelbase and with nearly identical front and rear tracks. Under the bonnet is a 3.0-litre V6 driving the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. It’s the same engine used in the Cadillac CT6. “It’s buildable,” says Cadillac chief engineer Dave Leone. “The business case is the issue.” What helps the business case is that the production version would be built using GM’s Alpha architecture, which underpins Cadillac’s ATS and CTS as well as Camaro. Alpha means the car would not only share components that are already produced in volume, but a number of different variants of the car could also easily be configured. The Avista’s engine bay, for example, will accept GM’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four, and while the 6.2-litre V8 can also be fitted into Alpha, sources say the Avista’s underbonnet layout has not been protected for the larger engine. The eight-speed auto can be swapped for a six-speed manual, and it can be built with all-wheel drive as well as rear-drive. Importantly, it can be built in right-hand drive. That means GM could easily build Opel, Vauxhall and Holden versions of the car, offering powertrains that suit each market, along with different equipment levels and different chassis set-ups. “Think of all the performance hardware in the parts bin,” teases Welburn. An HSV Avista with all-wheel drive and the 346kW, twin-turbo 3.6-litre V6 from the Cadillac ATS-V? It’s possible. “That’s just a good business model,” says Aldred of selling Avista as an Opel. “If you can build a vehicle that’s competing in Europe, North America and China, you’ve pretty much got it covered.” And what about Holden? “Holden’s in the mix,” confirms Aldred, a Brit who was managing director of Vauxhall before taking on the Buick/GMC job, so knows GM’s Australian subsidiary well. “We could do right-hand drive. That investment’s done, though there is an additional expense. I guess you’ve gotta see if there is enough volume in the UK with Vauxhall.” Avista has a lot of enthusiastic supporters inside GM. “It’s gorgeous,” gushed GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “I said to Mark [Reuss], ‘We have to find a way of doing this one’.” Lower sales expectations and premium margins mean a fourdoor coupe is perhaps a safer choice as a Buick halo car than a large sedan like the Avenir, which would have had to compete with everything from an S-Class Benz to Hyundai’s new Genesis G90. Even so, GM product planners are wary of committing investment dollars to this notoriously fickle segment. And that’s why there’s a strong faction inside GM that wants to stretch Avista’s wheelbase slightly and add a couple of doors.
  • NEW 2016 KAWASAKI ZX-10R.

    With World Superbike regulations becoming ever stricter with regard to modifications, manufacturers have to make sure their production models already have the proper pieces in place. And after winning two World Superbike championships in the past three years, Kawasaki shows that it’s serious about staying at the top of the superbike heap with its all-new 2016 ZX-10R. All of the extensive updates to Team Green’s new literbike were gleaned from lessons learned in WSBK competition and intended to make sure the factory team has a solid base to start from for the coming season. Engine Other than the previous engine’s bore and stroke, there’s little carried over between the old and new ZX-10R. The new crankshaft is lighter for quicker response and improved handling, with a correspondingly lighter balance shaft and rod journals that have a new coating for reduced friction at higher rpm. New 5-gram-lighter pistons, cams with more overlap, and a new airbox (25 percent more volume and air filter with 60 percent more surface area for better fl ow) work with an all-new cylinder head featuring reworked and polished intake and exhaust ports (previously only the intake ports were polished) plus revised combustion chambers. The titanium exhaust valves increase in size 1mm to 25.5mm, and cylinder-wall thickness was increased slightly for a more rigid engine block. The titanium alloy headers use a new heat-resistant alloy that allows thinner wall thickness for reduced weight, and the titanium exhaust canister has 50 percent more volume for better fl ow without increased sound levels. The intake portion of the frame’s steering head was modified to quell intake honk, allowing some freedom in the exhaust for more power without exceeding strict noise restrictions. The transmission remains a racing-style cassette design for quick and easy internal gearing changes. Gear ratios are closer for track use, with shorter ratios in all but first gear. The slipper clutch is 130 grams lighter, and some of the gears have dry-film lubricant coating to reduce friction. A contactless- sensor-equipped quickshifter similar to the H2R is standard, with the optional Kawasaki race ECU offering clutchless downshifts as well. Electronics The new ZX-10R utilizes a Bosch five-axis IMU with software developed in-house at Kawasaki that allows the unit to calculate yaw rate from other sensors, resulting in six-axis operation. This allows the IMU to sense changes in pavement elevation, camber, and the motorcycle’s position relative to them, as well as discern different tire profiles so that the bike is not restricted to just the OEM tires. The Sport-Kawasaki TRaction Control (S-KTRC) system now has five modes of operation instead of three as with the previous ZX-10R. Modes 1 and 2 are designed for racing, while mode 3 is for a “dry circuit with highgrip tires,” mode 4 is for “dry canyon roads or commuting,” and mode 5 is intended for wet pavement use. The Keihin 47mm throttle bodies utilize an electronic ride-by-wire throttle system to control power in addition to ignition retardation. With the Bosch IMU, Kawasaki was able to produce its own version of the cornering ABS that has seen usage on KTM and BMW motorcycles. Kawasaki’s system is called Cornering Management Function and changes braking pressure according to the bike’s lean and pitch angles to prevent it from standing up under braking in a corner. Another new addition is the Kawasaki Launch Control Mode (KLCM), with three modes available. And Kawasaki Engine Braking Control-first seen on the supercharged H2R-manages engine back-torque. Lastly, there are three selectable power modes for the new ZX-10R: Full, Middle (providing approximately 80 percent power), or Low (allowing 60 percent power). Chassis The new Ninja’s frame has also been redone, with the steering head moved rearward 7.5mm closer to the rider, while the swingarm has been lengthened 15.8mm (in addition to extra bracing for more torsional rigidity), resulting in more front weight bias. Wheelbase is now listed as 56.7 inches, almost a half inch longer than its predecessor. An all-new Showa Balance Free Fork featuring an external damping valve chamber utilizes a design similar to the ?hlins TTX/FGR concept, with the rebound and compression damping valves completely separated so that the oil only flows in one direction through the valves; in conjunction with nitrogen pressurization in the damping chamber, this keeps the pressure on both sides of the valves as consistent as possible, drastically reducing cavitation that results in inconsistent damping. The rear Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion (BFRC) shock uses the same concept in its damping valves, and the shock linkage has been revised to allow a broader range of adjustment. Brakes have also been fully upgraded, with Brembo M50 monoblock aluminum calipers with 30mm pistons biting on huge 330mm discs for awesome stopping power. A Brembo radial-action master cylinder equipped with steel-braided brake lines ensures positive and responsive feel at the lever as well as better consistency. Wheels are one of the few components that haven’t been changed, though they are now shod with Bridgestone RS10 street/track rubber in 120/70-17 front and 190/55-17 rear sizes. Bodywork has undergone some restyling, with the windscreen improved for better aerodynamics. Overall weight is claimed at 450 pounds wet with all fluids and a full tank of fuel for the non-ABS model, 454 pounds wet for the ABS model. List prices are $14,999 for the standard ZX-10R, $15,299 for the Special Edition paint, $15,999 for the ZX-10R ABS model, and $16,299 for the ZX-10R ABS with Special Edition paint scheme. How will all of these changes affect Kawasaki’s performance in World Superbike and on the showroom floor? We can’t wait to find out.
  • SCRAMBLER CLASSIC.

    Ducati’s new Scrambler range is a trip down memory lane. A modern tribute to the care-free, halcyon days of the original Scrambler, which was born in 1962. Born free, in fact, as is engraved on the fuel cap. Sweet touches like that bring a smile to my face and encourage me to mentally unshackle from the putrid and mayhem filled realities of the so-called modern world. The Scrambler Classic is the machine to do it on. So easy to ride. Easy on the eye. Comfortable. Inspiring in a fashion that is not bent towards velocity. You don’t have to try and be fast on one. Just take it easy, dude, enjoy the ride and pass it on. The new Scrambler has an extra cylinder and a fair bit more capacity over its distant predecessor, using the reliable and effervescent 803cc air-cooled Desmo two-valve engine. The motor yields an excellent mix of easily accessible power and consistent torque that is further bolstered by well matched gearbox ratios. The bike is ultra-narrow and low in the seat, and all controls are easy to use and light to the touch, making it an attractive prospect to whatever your gender. With a slight weight of 170kg to lug, the Scrambler is certainly a zesty little number, but not intimidating. That’s what its all about, man. The diamond stitched and suitably well-used couch brown seat, spoked wheels, brushed aluminium tank covers and cow-horn ‘bars scream vintage and do a good job of hiding the machine’s actual modernity. If you look more closely there are other nice touches, like the aluminium guards, machined engine covers and tidy exhaust plumbing. It is touted as a fashion and lifestyle statement, again like its daddy, and is effective in this regard. Ducati know this, of course, and have an entire wardrobe available pour femme et homme. Handling is pretty darn good. The 18in front and relatively high profile tyres tend to slow direction changes, but this is well compensated by the handlebars, light weight and general rider ergonomics. It’s a willing performer in the curves too, with good clearance and confident corner tracking. The relatively soft suspension is not complex and provides decent stroke for absorbing corrugations. The overall comfort helps alleviate some of the effects of “hanging out in the wind” a bit, too. Brakes, which feature the miracle of ABS and “radial” caliper mounting, are effective but feel wooden, like old Brembos do. The dash is suitably sparse, but a disappointment - there is nothing analogue in it and it is not easily read, which is a shame. But in keeping with the peace, love and good happiness stuff theme, I can forgive and even forget. Overall, the Scrambler is a great little machine that is rewarding as much as it is pleasing to ride. Just hop on and go - it’s that easy. It is destined to be a hit with many people seeking a bike that is functional and places the rider in a more restful universe.
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