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Brabus SLK

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Brabus SLK - information: Brabus SLK is a very good car, that was released by "Brabus" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Brabus SLK on this page.

Brand Name Brabus
Model Brabus SLK
Number of views 28195 views
Model's Rate 9.8 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro.

    You’ve probably already read about Audi’s grand plans for electrification of its model range, and soon it’ll have a second plug-in hybrid model to sell alongside the A3 e-tron launched earlier in the year. This time around the German firm has taken a different route, pairing the 3.0-litre TDI engine from the Q7 with a 126bhp electric motor, which together develop a mighty 369bhp and 516lb ft of torque. Owners will be able to travel up to around 34 miles, depending on the climate, which Audi reckons will be just enough for the daily commute to and from work for the average motorist. Three intelligent driving modes - EV, hybrid and battery hold - can work in tandem with the navigation system for best efficiency thanks to what Audi calls a predictive efficiency assistant. The price tag for all of this technology has yet to be revealed, but is expected to be Ј60k after Government grants, which is a hefty premium over the regular diesel editions. For anyone that’s expecting to see a whole load of electronic trickery, you’ll be disappointed, because the Q7 e-tron looks decidedly like any other diesel Q7, though the instruments have been altered to take into account of the electric motor, including the excellent Virtual Cockpit fitted to our test car. Beautifully finished, soft-touch materials are used throughout the cabin, delivering a high quality ambience. While the driving position is suitably command-like, the height of the dashboard is relatively low and so isn’t quite as imposing as other large SUVs. Supportive seats, a wide range of adjustments to both the chairs and the steering wheel mean that just about anyone can get a comfortable driving position. The cabin is simply huge, and whereas conventionally powered Q7s come with seven-seats as standard, due to the hybrid gubbins, there’s just five here. But that’s just fine as there’s generous space to spread out both front and rear. Boot space is inevitably smaller, but just 120 litre have been lost due to electrification. That still leaves a sizeable 650 litres with the seats up, and an expansive 1,835 litres with the chairs down. Performance is effortless, with smooth, linear acceleration no matter which source of power is being used. While in electric-mode, it’s eerily quiet, with only a distant sound from the tyres to be heard. The engine cuts in almost imperceptibly, with none of the vibrations that rival hybrids were afflicted with. Even with the diesel engine in action, sounds are nicely muted, with the cabin of the Q7 a calm place to travel. There’s a fluid feel to the steering with nice weighting that allows for accurate, precise cornering, and despite its bulk, this e-tron Q7 feels relatively light on its wheels. It handles flatly with little sign of body roll, backed up with huge amounts of grip. The only fly in the ointment is that of brake pedal feel that at times doesn’t inspire total confidence. Ride comfort is impressive, delivering a magic carpet-like ride from its adjustable adaptive suspension.
  • Seinfeld Porsches to auction at Amelia Island.

    Gooding & Co has pulled off something of a coup with the news the esteemed US auction house has been chosen to put 16 Porsches from the famous Jerry Seinfeld Collection under the hammer at the Amelia Island sale on 11 March. Comedian, Seinfeld is one of the most well known Porsche collectors in the world, however, the exact details regarding the cars in his collection (rumoured to be around 50-strong) have, until now, remained relatively secret. Among the Zuffenhausen metal on offer from the Seinfeld Collection, which includes a 1955 550 Spyder (expected to realise Ј3.4-4.1 million), a 917/30 and a Carrera GT prototype, there are a number of significant Porsche 911s set for the sale at Amelia Island. From Total 911’s perspective, the most interesting of these from the comedian’s consignment is the genuine 1974 911 3.0-litre IROC RSR, complete with a Ј830,000-Ј1 million estimate. Chassis 911 460 0016 was the first RSR chassis built for the inaugural International Race of Champions and was driven to third place in the first race at the Riverside Raceway by American F1 star, Peter Revson. The Bright yellow 911, powered by a 3.0-litre version of Porsche’s high butterfl y RSR engine, was also driven by 1973 Indy 500 winner, Gordon Johncock, and 1972 Can-Am champion, George Follmer. The incredible consignment also includes a 993 RSR Cup car and a 997 GT3 4.0 Cup Brumos Commerative Edition (a special collaboration between the esteemed dealer and Porsche Motorsport North America). On the road car front, three Porsche Speedsters catch the eye: a 1957 356A, a 3.2 Carrera and a 997 (the latter in Pure Blue), while a 964 Turbo S Flachbau will also be up for grabs. “I’ve never bought a car as an investment,” Seinfeld has explained. “I don’t really even think of myself as a collector. I just love cars. And I still love these cars. But it’s time to send some of them back into the world, for someone else to enjoy, as I have.” The Seinfeld Collection will go under the hammer at Racquet Island during the Amelia Island Concours week on Friday 11 March. Check Total911.com for updates.
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