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BRM P160E

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BRM P160E - information: BRM P160E is a very good car, that was released by "BRM" company. We collected the best 11 photos of BRM P160E on this page.

Brand Name BRM
Model BRM P160E
Number of views 34159 views
Model's Rate 7.5 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
  • DUCATI DIAVEL RED.

    Got issues? Anger management, racing crouch Tourette’s, grumpier as the days pass? Perhaps Ducati have the panacea for those ills and others in the form of the Diavel. The hulking, fat and stretched alleged cruiser from Bologna is much more than a parts bin Frankenstein. Hang on to what’s left of your soul because this devil is captivating enough to be almost anyone’s Faustian bargain. Why? Be comforted by the beckoning seat that embraces your buttocks delightfully and holds you low and squarely in genuine comfort. Find your new foot position. Fire up the Testastretta 11° engine, which was surely made in heaven and roll along on the sled-like long wheelbase chassis, monster brakes and ultra-fat rear hoop. Look mean. Sound mean. Be mean. Or be a show pony, as it matters not - the Diavel will not be fazed. I was sceptical at first, but I’m now a wild-eyed disciple. How? Let the magnificent engine do the work. From the bottom rung of the ladder to the top, it does not cease providing chunky, wieldy torque and still thirsts to be spun up - a gem of an engine that is aided with sublime fuelling and excellent throttle reaction. Diavel weight distribution, which is lardy for a duck, and a lengthy wheelbase ensures stability is a priority, however, the ergonomics and ‘bars assist in defying physics with surprisingly relaxed direction changes. Top shelf suspension is well suited, enhancing the solid geometry and includes on-the-fly rear adjustment. Stopping is a non-issue, the superbike specification brakes are truly splendid, offering a deftness of touch that is inspiring. Styling is debatable I reckon, but your call, and who cares when you can bank over enough to scrape your boots in hateful salute to the authorities and all the while the beast begs for more? Just change your style from hard braking late into bends and body slamming the bike down, to increasing the radii and rolling around that big back tyre. The demeanour of the bike, like Beelzebub himself, is misleading as it appeases the senses, relaxes and makes you chill, but will get you maniacal from the pleasures. It is definitely a faster point to point machine than it might appear. The technology, love or hate it, is there in spades and includes ride-by-wire throttle, several electronic safety systems, multi-modes to corral the Testastretta wallop and dual displays for God knows why. A mortal sin is the keyless ignition - a nonsense. Another is machine width, which kind of made it impossible to efficiently lane split. The Diavel is a new, perhaps controversial, branch on Ducati’s evolutionary tree, but a significant one. The non-compromising approach by the designers and engineers has made a sophisticated and capable machine that needs to be ridden to be properly appreciated. It will not be to everyone’s liking, but the lure of the dark side, which is now available in traditional red for the Australian market, may be the elixir for many evils. God bless the Diavel?
  • EXPOSITION SUZUKI.

    Suzuki celebrated 30 years of the GSX-R750 at the show, but focused on the entire company heritage with bikes ranging from the 1963 T10 250cc twin through to the latest GSX-R racer in the World Endurance series. Meliand brought the team’s ’83 Herve Moineau/Richard Hubin, title-winning GS1000. The aluminium box-frame machine was the precursor to the GSX-R750 launched in 1975. The stand was very much racing driven with a 1983 Wes Cooley-style Yoshimura GS1000 (right), ex-Marco Luchinelli XR14 RG500, ex-Jack Findlay.
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