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Bugatti Type 2

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Bugatti Type 2 - information: Bugatti Type 2 is a very good car, that was released by "Bugatti" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Bugatti Type 2 on this page.

Brand Name Bugatti
Model Bugatti Type 2
Number of views 36523 views
Model's Rate 9.8 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • THE FORGOTTEN TWIN.

    With naked bikes suddenly gaining favor with US consumers after decades of resistance, the manufacturers are tripping over themselves rushing bodywork-less bikes to the market. BMW already took advantage of its S 1000 four-cylinder platform to get into the action with its S 1000 R in 2014 , but ironically it’s already had a naked bike for years in boxer twin form. And with the R 1200 R finally getting the new-generation wasserboxer engine for 2015 (along with other upgrades), BMW has brought that model in as well to cover all its bases in the naked-bike arena. Utilizing the same DOHC, 1,170cc fl at opposed-twin powerplant that propels the latest R 1200 GS/GS Adventure, RT, and new RS model, the R 1200 R makes full use of the claimed 125 hp at 7,750 rpm and 92 footpounds of torque at 6,500 rpm. In fact, the R 1200 R is actually claimed to have slightly better torque at low rpm than the GS/GS Adventure and RT because of its different airbox and muffl er setup to work with the R’s naked styling. Add to that reduced weight to push around (the claimed curb weight of the R is 508 pounds, while the GS and GS Adventure weigh 525 and 573 pounds, respectively, and the RT scales in at 604 pounds) and you have the makings of a much livelier boxer twin. The new R 1200 R retains the standard ASC (Automatic Stability Control) system combining traction control and ABS, but it now includes two riding modes, Road and Rain, with Rain mode obviously tailoring the throttle response, power, and ASC for slippery conditions. There’s an optional Ride Modes Pro that employs an internal inertial motion sensor to offer additional Dynamic and User ride modes. Dynamic ride mode uses the lean angle sensor to tailor the traction control much better than the standard ASC and allows the throttle response to be much more direct, while User mode allows custom setup of the ride mode using any of the various parameters. For 2015, the R 1200 R gets a new tubular steel frame that jettisons front of the engine), with the Paralever single-sided swingarm rear suspension returning. Optional ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) that allows tool-less spring preload and damping adjustments returns with the addition of the latest-generation Dynamic ESA that uses the aforementioned inertial motion sensor and a linear potentiometer on the shock to change damping at both ends automatically according to riding conditions. Dual 320mm discs and Brembo four-piston calipers handle braking duties up front, with a single 276mm disc and two-piston fl oating caliper out back. The R (in stock form, at least) is apparently aimed toward shorter riders, as not only was I able to easily put both feet fl at on the ground with my 30-inch inseam despite the listed 31-inch seat height, but legroom felt a bit cramped. Add the seemingly tall perch of the tapered aluminum conventional handlebar, and we thought perhaps our testbike might have been fitted with the accessory shorter seat (29.9 inches) by mistake, but it wasn’t. Anyone around 5-foot-7 or taller will likely want to fit the accessory “high rider’s” seat (32.3 inches) or “sport rider’s” seat (33 inches). There’s no doubt that the R model boxer has livelier acceleration than any of its other R 1200 series counterparts, a likely by-product of its lesser heft. The usual manageable grunt right off idle permits effortlessly rapid takeoffs from a stoplight, and there’s plenty of midrange punch to easily dart past traffic on the road or highway. Even in its latest-generation guise, the boxer doesn’t pretend to be a twin-cylinder superbike, so while the engine continues to make good power on up near its 8,000-rpm redline, it’s not as exciting as, say, Yamaha’s FZ-09 triple-but it does get the job done effi- ciently with little fuss. Throttle response was smooth and amiable in the Road setting (smooth enough that the muted response of the Rain mode isn’t necessary in our opinion); our test unit wasn’t equipped with the Riding Mode Pro option, so we weren’t able to experience the “direct” throttle response of the Dynamic mode. Our R model came equipped with the Dynamic ESA option, and we found it to work well at keeping the chassis composed during acceleration and braking while offering reasonable compliance on the highway. We’ve never been big fans of the Telelever front end because of the numb feedback it gives during corner entry, and there’s a definite improvement in front-end feel with the conventional inverted fork on the new R. Our only gripe would be some harshness over sharp-edged bumps in the Dynamic setting, which isn’t present in the Road damping setting. Steering is delightfully nimble yet stable and neutral, allowing quick line changes or traffic avoidance maneuvers with little effort. There’s also a decent amount of ground clearance, even with the standard centerstand. Braking from the ABS-equipped (which can be switched off) system is strong and responsive, hauling down the R easily with no drama. Aiding in that lack of drama was our R model’s Gear Shift Assistant Pro feature that allows clutchless downshifts as well as upshifts, permitting you to rapid-fire down through the gears without worrying about throttle blipping. And thankfully the version on the boxer isn’t plagued with the vague feel and action of the S 1000 unit. At $13,950 for the base version (with optional packages boosting the price to more than $17,000 ), the BMW R 1200 R certainly isn’t for the average naked-bike rider. It’s obviously not the most powerful, the most stylish, or the most economical machine in the class. But if you love that boxer twin power and handling along with a good dose of modern technology in a roadster design, the R 1200 R is certainly worth a look.
  • This is Yamaha S10000R.

    YAMAHA ALWAYS SAID there would be larger MTmodels, and that the crossplane-crank inline-four engine fromthe YZF-R1 could be used. Given theMT-07’s twin andMT-09’s triple are ‘crossplane concept’ and called the CP2 andCP3, it would kindamake sense to have an actual crossplanemotor in the range. So here’s the newMT-10. This isn’t just the engine froman R1. Unlike its purposebuilt siblings, and despite promising to be ‘enjoyed on any road, any time and at any speed’, theMT-10 is heavily based on themachine that donates its gravelly, snarling engine. Frame, forks, shock and brakes are nicked fromthe sportsbike (or, to be precise, the slightly lower-spec R1-S that they get in the USA). This is Yamaha’s S1000R. Obviously there are changes. The 998cc engine has different pistons, crank, intake, exhaust and injection for bottom-end balls and midrange might, and revised gearing. Like other MTs there are three ridingmodes, but the MT-10 also has cruise control and threelevel traction. A quickshifter will be optional. The frame has ‘optimised strength/rigidity balance’, with a steel subframe andmodified settings for the suspension, and a stubby 1400mmwheelbase - just 20mm longer than the trim newMT-03. Radial calipers have ABS, and the Bridgestone tyres are specially developed for the bike. You’ll get 17 litres in the tank and there’s a 12v power socket. Colours? Blue, black, or the ‘Night Fluro’ grey with high-vis wheels that’s available across theMT range. Yamaha have trodden this path before. The now-defunct FZ1was based on an R1, but its attitude and revvy delivery made it hard work against rival nakeds of the day. Times change however, and now we’re in the age of the supernaked theMT could be just the job. Yamaha haven’t decided howmuch power or weight to claim, or howmuch it’ll cost. But they do assure us that the new MT-10 will be here in May.
  • DUCATI 1299 PANIGALES.

    I missed the opportunity to test the regular Ducati 1299 Panigale earlier in the year but first impressions of the 1299 Panigale S are very positive. Jumping on, the bike is tall with an easy reach to the ground even for my 180cm height, reach to the bars is aggressive and the pegs are relatively tall. Taking the Panigale S through my usual testing route the first thing that impressed me was just how planted the bike is, even over relatively poor road surfaces the bike just feels like it’s glued to the road, with great feel front and rear. It’s still very firm, but the semiactive mode takes the bite out of the bumps and as a result the real kick experienced in the old 1199 that was so punishing, to your bum, spine and kidneys, is gone. The S is quite agile, with neutral steering that doesn’t exactly require muscling but does require concentration and thought about where you want to go. Changing your line mid-corner is easy and it really does feel like you’re on rails, regardless of your speed. I’d say it’s similar to the 899 Panigale, on which you don’t notice the effort that goes into handling until you jump on something that feels noticeably quicker steering. That’s not a criticism though, just an observation. The Brembo EVO M50 brake calipers on the front are also extremely strong, not in an off-putting fashion but I did find it easier to use the awesome Ducati Quick Shifter with auto-blipper to drop down a gear to wash off some speed. Talking of power the engine is a belter, down low the 1285cc L-twin is lumpy and you can just about roll along at 19km/h in first without clutch but it’s not pleasant, but that does smooth out rapidly as you reach higher into the revs. The fueling and throttle response are both super smooth and responsive, with Sport providing a smoother power delivery and throttle response than Race and power is just explosive. It’s also seriously loud with the two-into-two system with the stock stainless mufflers in the belly and I thought I might pop an eardrum when I rode into our underground garage a bit too vigorously! What did stand out is just how heavy the clutch lever is, it felt like fighting a bear trap when I got caught in really heavy traffic and was having to use it frequently. The DQS on the other hand means that in anything except stop-start traffic you aren’t using the clutch constantly. The Panigale 1299 S certainly has the goods to justify a model suffix, with its full LED lighting, carbon-fibre front guard and auxiliary adjustment buttons adding to the awesome Panigale package. But what really conveys the value of the premium price of $34,990 plus on roads is the full Ohlins suspension, using the Ohlins Smart EC semi-active suspension system for both the NIX30 forks and TTX36 rear shock, as well as an Ohlins steering damper, while further communicating with the Bosch Inertia Platform - which provides cornering ABS and greater traction control refinement. Not only this but the system can actually be run in Fixed mode, which turns off the semiactive suspension and allows full adjustability, just like in a traditional system.
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