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Burrell 4 n.h.p. 5 ton

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Burrell 4 n.h.p. 5 ton - information: Burrell 4 n.h.p. 5 ton is a very good car, that was released by "Burrell" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Burrell 4 n.h.p. 5 ton on this page.

Brand Name Burrell
Model Burrell 4 n.h.p. 5 ton
Number of views 111348 views
Model's Rate 9.9 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • CUSHIONING THE RIDE.

    Citroen and Britain go back a long way. Early Citroens were first sold here just after the first World War, from 1919. They quickly endeared themselves to UK drivers, and by 1923 there were already over 23,000 of the cars on British roads. Then, for almost 40 years, from 1926 until 1965, British-made Citroens were produced in a factory in Slough. We Brits are still major consumers of Citroen products, as the third largest market in the world for the cars, behind only China, and Citroen’s native France. There is another very strong Anglo-French link. For the past 18 months, Citroen’s global boss has been a British chief executive, who also happens to be one of the most senior women in the motor industry worldwide. Linda Jackson, former managing director of Citroen UK, runs the company from its Paris base and is shaping its future with some radical plans. Briefly back in Britain on a day trip via Eurostar, she revealed her strategy for driving the company forward and restoring some of its past glory. This is, after all, the brand with some very notable models in its 96-year history, such as the pioneering Traction Avant, the unforgettable 2CV, and the remarkable Ami 6. Citroens used to be known for their quirkiness, a characteristic that had evaporated in a couple of generations of rather bland models, but has recently been revived in the much more characterful Citroen C4 Cactus, with its distinctive body-protecting airbumps. Initial plans to build 70,000 units a year has proved overly modest, and current C4 Cactus production is running at 110,000 per annum. So can we expect more of the same in future models? Yes, says Linda Jackson. Although it is hard to quantify within a largely French-speaking company, as there is no direct translation in French for the word quirky. “The success of the C4 Cactus shows you can have a vehicle that stands out and be successful with it,” comments Linda. “We have never been successful when we try to be like everyone else. It’s a gamble to be quirky, but it’s what we are doing.” Something else for which Citroen has traditionally been known is the magic carpet ride quality of its famed hydropneumatic suspension, although more recently a hydraulic system on the current C5 has sought to deliver a modern version of cushioning ride comfort. But now Citroen is on the brink of revealing a revolutionary new suspension system that Linda says will be exclusive to the French firm, and will eventually become standard right across the range. It will appear on the first new model in 2017. For the moment she is a bit cagey about the specifics, whether it will be a self-levelling design, or some kind of air suspension system, but she promises it will take Citroen back to its roots of admirable ‘floating’ ride comfort, while maintaining good body control for handling precision. “Comfort is a core value of the Citroen brand, and this is our way to recreate the benefits of the hydropneumatic set-up in a more modern, more appropriate way,” she told us. Meanwhile, she is busy with bold plans to slim the Citroen range from its current 14 different body styles to a more rational seven core designs based around three platforms. It’s intended to make the brand both leaner and fitter, and also better structured for customers to appreciate what Citroen is about. So how does a British boss go down in an iconic French company? Pretty well so far. A clear direction and plans to resurrect some of what made past Citroens special is winning her respect. They’re even quite kind about her A-level-based ability to speak French. “They say I have an accent like Jane Birkin,” says an amused Linda.
  • RECREATING HISTORY.

    A stunningMoto Guzzi V8 works racer replica looks certain to steal the show at Coys sale at theMCNLondonMotorcycle Show at Excel on February 13. The bike was built in the early 2000s by ex-factory technicians with access to original drawings and spares to use as patterns to make new components. Coys haven’t provided an estimate but, with only two original V8 racers existing, the parade-ready replica should attract a three-figure sum. Other bikes from the same Italian collection to be offered at Excel include a gorgeous 1957 Ducati 125cc Bialbero racer (estimate ?65,000-70,000), a rare 1955 100cc Cecatto Bialbero racer (?29,000-35,000), a 1938 250cc Benelli Bialbero race bike (?48,000-52,000) and a 1931 1300cc Indian Type 402 four, fully restored in 2010 with minimal mileage since (?55,000-65,000). Entries for the capital’s only motorcycle-only sale scheduled for 2016 are still open and the catalogue - which will be available on January 25 - closes on January 19. Entry fees are ?350 per bike and buyers’ and sellers’ commission is set at 10% plus VAT. Over 100 lots are promised for the sale, which starts at 2.30pm on Saturday February 13 (viewing from February 12). Potential vendors contact Anthony Godin (07854 213928 or 0208 614 7888).
  • THE FORGOTTEN TWIN.

    With naked bikes suddenly gaining favor with US consumers after decades of resistance, the manufacturers are tripping over themselves rushing bodywork-less bikes to the market. BMW already took advantage of its S 1000 four-cylinder platform to get into the action with its S 1000 R in 2014 , but ironically it’s already had a naked bike for years in boxer twin form. And with the R 1200 R finally getting the new-generation wasserboxer engine for 2015 (along with other upgrades), BMW has brought that model in as well to cover all its bases in the naked-bike arena. Utilizing the same DOHC, 1,170cc fl at opposed-twin powerplant that propels the latest R 1200 GS/GS Adventure, RT, and new RS model, the R 1200 R makes full use of the claimed 125 hp at 7,750 rpm and 92 footpounds of torque at 6,500 rpm. In fact, the R 1200 R is actually claimed to have slightly better torque at low rpm than the GS/GS Adventure and RT because of its different airbox and muffl er setup to work with the R’s naked styling. Add to that reduced weight to push around (the claimed curb weight of the R is 508 pounds, while the GS and GS Adventure weigh 525 and 573 pounds, respectively, and the RT scales in at 604 pounds) and you have the makings of a much livelier boxer twin. The new R 1200 R retains the standard ASC (Automatic Stability Control) system combining traction control and ABS, but it now includes two riding modes, Road and Rain, with Rain mode obviously tailoring the throttle response, power, and ASC for slippery conditions. There’s an optional Ride Modes Pro that employs an internal inertial motion sensor to offer additional Dynamic and User ride modes. Dynamic ride mode uses the lean angle sensor to tailor the traction control much better than the standard ASC and allows the throttle response to be much more direct, while User mode allows custom setup of the ride mode using any of the various parameters. For 2015, the R 1200 R gets a new tubular steel frame that jettisons front of the engine), with the Paralever single-sided swingarm rear suspension returning. Optional ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) that allows tool-less spring preload and damping adjustments returns with the addition of the latest-generation Dynamic ESA that uses the aforementioned inertial motion sensor and a linear potentiometer on the shock to change damping at both ends automatically according to riding conditions. Dual 320mm discs and Brembo four-piston calipers handle braking duties up front, with a single 276mm disc and two-piston fl oating caliper out back. The R (in stock form, at least) is apparently aimed toward shorter riders, as not only was I able to easily put both feet fl at on the ground with my 30-inch inseam despite the listed 31-inch seat height, but legroom felt a bit cramped. Add the seemingly tall perch of the tapered aluminum conventional handlebar, and we thought perhaps our testbike might have been fitted with the accessory shorter seat (29.9 inches) by mistake, but it wasn’t. Anyone around 5-foot-7 or taller will likely want to fit the accessory “high rider’s” seat (32.3 inches) or “sport rider’s” seat (33 inches). There’s no doubt that the R model boxer has livelier acceleration than any of its other R 1200 series counterparts, a likely by-product of its lesser heft. The usual manageable grunt right off idle permits effortlessly rapid takeoffs from a stoplight, and there’s plenty of midrange punch to easily dart past traffic on the road or highway. Even in its latest-generation guise, the boxer doesn’t pretend to be a twin-cylinder superbike, so while the engine continues to make good power on up near its 8,000-rpm redline, it’s not as exciting as, say, Yamaha’s FZ-09 triple-but it does get the job done effi- ciently with little fuss. Throttle response was smooth and amiable in the Road setting (smooth enough that the muted response of the Rain mode isn’t necessary in our opinion); our test unit wasn’t equipped with the Riding Mode Pro option, so we weren’t able to experience the “direct” throttle response of the Dynamic mode. Our R model came equipped with the Dynamic ESA option, and we found it to work well at keeping the chassis composed during acceleration and braking while offering reasonable compliance on the highway. We’ve never been big fans of the Telelever front end because of the numb feedback it gives during corner entry, and there’s a definite improvement in front-end feel with the conventional inverted fork on the new R. Our only gripe would be some harshness over sharp-edged bumps in the Dynamic setting, which isn’t present in the Road damping setting. Steering is delightfully nimble yet stable and neutral, allowing quick line changes or traffic avoidance maneuvers with little effort. There’s also a decent amount of ground clearance, even with the standard centerstand. Braking from the ABS-equipped (which can be switched off) system is strong and responsive, hauling down the R easily with no drama. Aiding in that lack of drama was our R model’s Gear Shift Assistant Pro feature that allows clutchless downshifts as well as upshifts, permitting you to rapid-fire down through the gears without worrying about throttle blipping. And thankfully the version on the boxer isn’t plagued with the vague feel and action of the S 1000 unit. At $13,950 for the base version (with optional packages boosting the price to more than $17,000 ), the BMW R 1200 R certainly isn’t for the average naked-bike rider. It’s obviously not the most powerful, the most stylish, or the most economical machine in the class. But if you love that boxer twin power and handling along with a good dose of modern technology in a roadster design, the R 1200 R is certainly worth a look.
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