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Chevrolet Luv 2300 LS

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Chevrolet Luv 2300 LS - information: Chevrolet Luv 2300 LS is a very good car, that was released by "Chevrolet" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Chevrolet Luv 2300 LS on this page.

Brand Name Chevrolet
Model Chevrolet Luv 2300 LS
Number of views 26219 views
Model's Rate 6.8 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
  • Moto 3 Team Launch.

    It’s no secret any longer that Peugeot Scooters, post their partnership with Mahindra and with the active involvement of Mahindra Racing, will be joining the 2016 Moto3 grid. The team was formally launched at EICMA 2015 with the 28-year-old Frenchman Alexis Masbou and 21-year-old Scotsman John McPhee announced as the two riders who will lead the French charge on the Moto3 racing grid. The team, officially known as Peugeot Saxo Print Racing Team, will be managed by Terell B Thien.
  • DUCATI 1299 PANIGALES.

    I missed the opportunity to test the regular Ducati 1299 Panigale earlier in the year but first impressions of the 1299 Panigale S are very positive. Jumping on, the bike is tall with an easy reach to the ground even for my 180cm height, reach to the bars is aggressive and the pegs are relatively tall. Taking the Panigale S through my usual testing route the first thing that impressed me was just how planted the bike is, even over relatively poor road surfaces the bike just feels like it’s glued to the road, with great feel front and rear. It’s still very firm, but the semiactive mode takes the bite out of the bumps and as a result the real kick experienced in the old 1199 that was so punishing, to your bum, spine and kidneys, is gone. The S is quite agile, with neutral steering that doesn’t exactly require muscling but does require concentration and thought about where you want to go. Changing your line mid-corner is easy and it really does feel like you’re on rails, regardless of your speed. I’d say it’s similar to the 899 Panigale, on which you don’t notice the effort that goes into handling until you jump on something that feels noticeably quicker steering. That’s not a criticism though, just an observation. The Brembo EVO M50 brake calipers on the front are also extremely strong, not in an off-putting fashion but I did find it easier to use the awesome Ducati Quick Shifter with auto-blipper to drop down a gear to wash off some speed. Talking of power the engine is a belter, down low the 1285cc L-twin is lumpy and you can just about roll along at 19km/h in first without clutch but it’s not pleasant, but that does smooth out rapidly as you reach higher into the revs. The fueling and throttle response are both super smooth and responsive, with Sport providing a smoother power delivery and throttle response than Race and power is just explosive. It’s also seriously loud with the two-into-two system with the stock stainless mufflers in the belly and I thought I might pop an eardrum when I rode into our underground garage a bit too vigorously! What did stand out is just how heavy the clutch lever is, it felt like fighting a bear trap when I got caught in really heavy traffic and was having to use it frequently. The DQS on the other hand means that in anything except stop-start traffic you aren’t using the clutch constantly. The Panigale 1299 S certainly has the goods to justify a model suffix, with its full LED lighting, carbon-fibre front guard and auxiliary adjustment buttons adding to the awesome Panigale package. But what really conveys the value of the premium price of $34,990 plus on roads is the full Ohlins suspension, using the Ohlins Smart EC semi-active suspension system for both the NIX30 forks and TTX36 rear shock, as well as an Ohlins steering damper, while further communicating with the Bosch Inertia Platform - which provides cornering ABS and greater traction control refinement. Not only this but the system can actually be run in Fixed mode, which turns off the semiactive suspension and allows full adjustability, just like in a traditional system.
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  • 2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan
    People could say the first car lacked two things: German charisma and the Japanese refinement of chassis. But still, when Hyundai put a price tag of $40,000 and sold a handsome amount of cars, it proved that they could compete in this new battlefield also. And, with their second attempt in this arena, you could say that they already have their rivals grinding their teeth. ...see full review

  • 2015 GMC Yukon XL / Yukon Denali XL
    The XL continues with traditional separate body and frame construction truck style, and the generational stiffness upgrades are updated in both the XLs. The firm suspensions provide for better control and sharper handling despite the almost nineteen feet long stretch of these machines. The flip side, especially with only one or two aboard, to this tauter demeanour is its firm ride. This problem is accentuated on Denali XL, which comes standard with magnetic-ride-control shocks. The refinement of these highly responsive components, which have a positive impact on other GM products – Corvette, Camaro ZL-1, CTS, etc. is not yet fully demonstrable in this truck application. We would recommend and would like to get the regular XL that has 18-inch wheels and get the best possible ride with its improved styling, comforting and noise reduction upgrades. The Denalis will remain as popular with their 6.2 liter V-8, given the importance of its famous zing. ...see full review

  • 2015 McLaren 650S Coupe / Spider
    Here's something he knows the best: Though the weather is foul the 650S becomes more stable and more controllable when the less the stability controls were on. Just because you might feel everything in the 650S was ok through few things to name-like the steering and seat, the firm break pedal. Certainly, few cars communicate each individual wheel's amount of grip with such clarity. The 650S tells you in certain terms that when the driver is approaching his own limits or more accurately and the more times we lapped Ascari, the higher the limits we knew. The 650S was excellent to be a patient guide as always at our level and allows one to reach high along its learning curve quickly and happily. ...see full review

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