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Ciferal Turquesa

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Ciferal Turquesa - information: Ciferal Turquesa is a very good car, that was released by "Ciferal" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Ciferal Turquesa on this page.

Brand Name Ciferal
Model Ciferal Turquesa
Number of views 26369 views
Model's Rate 9.4 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
  • CRF 1000L Africa Twin.

    Honda unveiled the celebrated CRF 1000L Africa Twin in Europe for the first time at EICMA. This adventure-tourer motorcycle is powered by a 998-cc parallel twin engine that draws heavily on Honda’s CRF 250 and 450 competition machines and uses the same four-valve Unicam head design. While the standard Africa Twin is available with a six-speed manual gearbox, there are two more versions to be had. The first features ABS and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC), which controls the amount of torque going to the wheel and, in doing so, prevents or allows wheelspin. The last variant of the Africa Twin features Honda’s Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) that was first seen on the VFR 1200F. Unlike on the sports tourer, however, on the Africa Twin, the DCT has also been programmed to function off-road. Unfortunately, it seems unlikely at the moment that the CRF 1000L Africa Twin will head to India anytime soon, but there’s no harm in hoping, is there?
  • FORD news.

    Enhancements to the C-MAX and Grand C-MAX with 1.5-litre TDCi engine and PowerShift gearbox has seen CO2 emissions tumble from 115 to 109g/km in the five-seat edition and 124 to 119g/km in the seven-seat Grand C-MAX model. It means that each version drops one vehicle excise duty band and in the case of the C-MAX, there’s a decease of two company car tax benefit-in kind brackets to 19 per cent. The Grand C-MAX drops one band to 21 per cent. Despite the enhanced efficiency, prices remain the same as before with the C-MAX Zetec 1.5 TDCi PowerShift costing Ј21,295 and rising to Ј26,395 for the Grand C-MAX Titaniumm X 1.5 TDCi PowerShift.
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