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Claas Lexion 430

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Claas Lexion 430 - information: Claas Lexion 430 is a very good car, that was released by "Claas" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Claas Lexion 430 on this page.

Brand Name Claas
Model Claas Lexion 430
Number of views 52150 views
Model's Rate 6.2 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • TRK 502.

    The Benelli TRK 502, which is also bound for our shores, will be a potent addition to the already formidable Benelli line-up in India. In a country where motorcycle touring is the primary form of leisure biking, the TRK 502 with its 47.6-PS and 45-Nm 500-cc liquid-cooled parallel twin (the same as in the Leoncino) and 20-litre petrol tank will definitely appeal to a whole new range of consumers. The bike features USD front forks and a rear monoshock, both with 150 mm of travel, in order to provide as plush a ride quality over long journeys as possible. The bike will also be available in a more off-road orientated version. Unlike the Tornado 302 and the Leoncino this bike will not be coming to India until the second half of 2016, which is when it will also be launched globally.
  • SCRAMBLER CLASSIC.

    Ducati’s new Scrambler range is a trip down memory lane. A modern tribute to the care-free, halcyon days of the original Scrambler, which was born in 1962. Born free, in fact, as is engraved on the fuel cap. Sweet touches like that bring a smile to my face and encourage me to mentally unshackle from the putrid and mayhem filled realities of the so-called modern world. The Scrambler Classic is the machine to do it on. So easy to ride. Easy on the eye. Comfortable. Inspiring in a fashion that is not bent towards velocity. You don’t have to try and be fast on one. Just take it easy, dude, enjoy the ride and pass it on. The new Scrambler has an extra cylinder and a fair bit more capacity over its distant predecessor, using the reliable and effervescent 803cc air-cooled Desmo two-valve engine. The motor yields an excellent mix of easily accessible power and consistent torque that is further bolstered by well matched gearbox ratios. The bike is ultra-narrow and low in the seat, and all controls are easy to use and light to the touch, making it an attractive prospect to whatever your gender. With a slight weight of 170kg to lug, the Scrambler is certainly a zesty little number, but not intimidating. That’s what its all about, man. The diamond stitched and suitably well-used couch brown seat, spoked wheels, brushed aluminium tank covers and cow-horn ‘bars scream vintage and do a good job of hiding the machine’s actual modernity. If you look more closely there are other nice touches, like the aluminium guards, machined engine covers and tidy exhaust plumbing. It is touted as a fashion and lifestyle statement, again like its daddy, and is effective in this regard. Ducati know this, of course, and have an entire wardrobe available pour femme et homme. Handling is pretty darn good. The 18in front and relatively high profile tyres tend to slow direction changes, but this is well compensated by the handlebars, light weight and general rider ergonomics. It’s a willing performer in the curves too, with good clearance and confident corner tracking. The relatively soft suspension is not complex and provides decent stroke for absorbing corrugations. The overall comfort helps alleviate some of the effects of “hanging out in the wind” a bit, too. Brakes, which feature the miracle of ABS and “radial” caliper mounting, are effective but feel wooden, like old Brembos do. The dash is suitably sparse, but a disappointment - there is nothing analogue in it and it is not easily read, which is a shame. But in keeping with the peace, love and good happiness stuff theme, I can forgive and even forget. Overall, the Scrambler is a great little machine that is rewarding as much as it is pleasing to ride. Just hop on and go - it’s that easy. It is destined to be a hit with many people seeking a bike that is functional and places the rider in a more restful universe.
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
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