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Club Car Carryall 2

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Club Car Carryall 2 - information: Club Car Carryall 2 is a very good car, that was released by "Club Car" company. We collected the best 6 photos of Club Car Carryall 2 on this page.

Brand Name Club Car
Model Club Car Carryall 2
Number of views 13205 views
Model's Rate 7.9 out of 10
Number of images 6 images
Interesting News
  • China the key to Avista’s future.

    THE future of Buick’s gorgeous Avista concept - and a Holdenbadged version - lies in two extra doors, according to General Motors insiders Wheels spoke to following the car’s Detroit motor show debut. Sources confirmed that a model of a four-door version exists in the GM styling studio and is under serious consideration following its overwhelmingly positive reaction as the star of the show. GM has started work on making a business case for building the car, and a Holden-badged version - including a higher-output HSV model - could be in the mix. GM sources hint the production Avista would likely end up being a four-door coupe designed as a more affordable rival to the Mercedes-Benz CLS, BMW 6 Series Gran Coupe and Audi A7 Sportback. While Buick last year showed off a four-door concept - the Australian-designed Avenir - the four-door Avista coupe would be smaller and sleeker, with more emphasis on proportions and design than rear seat space. The challenge for securing an Avista business case is ensuring enough global demand, and once again right-hand drive production is the big question mark. In the global automotive game, Buick (which sells only in China and North America) tends to fly under the radar. But with sales of 1.25 million vehicles last year - the highest in Buick’s 112 years - it is GM’s second best-selling brand worldwide after Chevrolet. Put that down to China, where it’s the country’s number two brand. China accounts for about 80 percent of total Buick sales, and therefore holds the key to any decision to produce Avista. Although Chinese consumers do not currently buy coupes in significant numbers, Buick and GMC vice-president Duncan Aldred doesn’t necessarily see that as a roadblock to Avista getting the green light for production. “I think we’ve earned the right to have the halo car in the Buick range,” Aldred says. “We’re the premium mainstream brand in China, and there’s great value in us continuing to stretch the brand upwards, even though it may not be massive volume.” “China is important to any Buick,” admits GM design chief Ed Welburn, who says GM’s Chinese product planners have seen the car. While China is now a massive SUV market, Welburn makes the point that Chinese consumers suddenly switched from buying sedans three years ago. “A coupe might be the next big thing.” The Avista concept is based on a mash-up of GM Alpha and Omega components, sharing the Alpha-based Chevrolet Camaro coupe’s 2811mm wheelbase and with nearly identical front and rear tracks. Under the bonnet is a 3.0-litre V6 driving the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. It’s the same engine used in the Cadillac CT6. “It’s buildable,” says Cadillac chief engineer Dave Leone. “The business case is the issue.” What helps the business case is that the production version would be built using GM’s Alpha architecture, which underpins Cadillac’s ATS and CTS as well as Camaro. Alpha means the car would not only share components that are already produced in volume, but a number of different variants of the car could also easily be configured. The Avista’s engine bay, for example, will accept GM’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four, and while the 6.2-litre V8 can also be fitted into Alpha, sources say the Avista’s underbonnet layout has not been protected for the larger engine. The eight-speed auto can be swapped for a six-speed manual, and it can be built with all-wheel drive as well as rear-drive. Importantly, it can be built in right-hand drive. That means GM could easily build Opel, Vauxhall and Holden versions of the car, offering powertrains that suit each market, along with different equipment levels and different chassis set-ups. “Think of all the performance hardware in the parts bin,” teases Welburn. An HSV Avista with all-wheel drive and the 346kW, twin-turbo 3.6-litre V6 from the Cadillac ATS-V? It’s possible. “That’s just a good business model,” says Aldred of selling Avista as an Opel. “If you can build a vehicle that’s competing in Europe, North America and China, you’ve pretty much got it covered.” And what about Holden? “Holden’s in the mix,” confirms Aldred, a Brit who was managing director of Vauxhall before taking on the Buick/GMC job, so knows GM’s Australian subsidiary well. “We could do right-hand drive. That investment’s done, though there is an additional expense. I guess you’ve gotta see if there is enough volume in the UK with Vauxhall.” Avista has a lot of enthusiastic supporters inside GM. “It’s gorgeous,” gushed GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “I said to Mark [Reuss], ‘We have to find a way of doing this one’.” Lower sales expectations and premium margins mean a fourdoor coupe is perhaps a safer choice as a Buick halo car than a large sedan like the Avenir, which would have had to compete with everything from an S-Class Benz to Hyundai’s new Genesis G90. Even so, GM product planners are wary of committing investment dollars to this notoriously fickle segment. And that’s why there’s a strong faction inside GM that wants to stretch Avista’s wheelbase slightly and add a couple of doors.
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
  • Bimota invent the techtro….

    Hands up-wedidn’t expect this. But givenBimotahavebased their newretro on theirmost contemporary, exclusive model we don’t think anyone did. TheirwildTesi 3D (Bike, Aug 2015 issue) is an engineeringmasterclass.Hub centre steering and a front swingarm separate suspension, steering and braking forces - so suspension functionswhile braking, bumps don’t affect steering, and so on. It’s amodernvisionof hewnaluminiumand hand-finishedparts. And soBimota think thismakes it perfect for some retroaction. For theRaceCafe the 3D’s angular body is swapped for a traditional profile and tiny seat unitwith the essential brown perch, and there’s the same headlight as onAriel’sAce. The 1078ccDucati V twin is swapped for the803cc Scrambler unit, with a curvy new pipe. Swingarms are un retro carbon. Stare long enough and, fromsome angles, the RaceCafe almost works… but not quite. For us, a Tesi should be all about sharp, cutting edge design. Other Bimotanews ismorepleasing. The newImpeto uses the Diavel’s bulging 1198ccTestastretta engine, anoptional blower taking peak power past 200bhp. Youcan specify a carbon frame, too. Best of all, Bimota are going back to their roots andoffering frame kits. Their BB3 canbe supplied as a rolling chassis to take the motor from a salvaged BMW S1000RR. Just like the good old days. Let’s hope the kit option extends to more models - we’d love to build our own Tesi (no brown seat).
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