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Club Car Carryall

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Club Car Carryall - information: Club Car Carryall is a very good car, that was released by "Club Car" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Club Car Carryall on this page.

Brand Name Club Car
Model Club Car Carryall
Number of views 83012 views
Model's Rate 8.9 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • DUCATI DIAVEL RED.

    Got issues? Anger management, racing crouch Tourette’s, grumpier as the days pass? Perhaps Ducati have the panacea for those ills and others in the form of the Diavel. The hulking, fat and stretched alleged cruiser from Bologna is much more than a parts bin Frankenstein. Hang on to what’s left of your soul because this devil is captivating enough to be almost anyone’s Faustian bargain. Why? Be comforted by the beckoning seat that embraces your buttocks delightfully and holds you low and squarely in genuine comfort. Find your new foot position. Fire up the Testastretta 11° engine, which was surely made in heaven and roll along on the sled-like long wheelbase chassis, monster brakes and ultra-fat rear hoop. Look mean. Sound mean. Be mean. Or be a show pony, as it matters not - the Diavel will not be fazed. I was sceptical at first, but I’m now a wild-eyed disciple. How? Let the magnificent engine do the work. From the bottom rung of the ladder to the top, it does not cease providing chunky, wieldy torque and still thirsts to be spun up - a gem of an engine that is aided with sublime fuelling and excellent throttle reaction. Diavel weight distribution, which is lardy for a duck, and a lengthy wheelbase ensures stability is a priority, however, the ergonomics and ‘bars assist in defying physics with surprisingly relaxed direction changes. Top shelf suspension is well suited, enhancing the solid geometry and includes on-the-fly rear adjustment. Stopping is a non-issue, the superbike specification brakes are truly splendid, offering a deftness of touch that is inspiring. Styling is debatable I reckon, but your call, and who cares when you can bank over enough to scrape your boots in hateful salute to the authorities and all the while the beast begs for more? Just change your style from hard braking late into bends and body slamming the bike down, to increasing the radii and rolling around that big back tyre. The demeanour of the bike, like Beelzebub himself, is misleading as it appeases the senses, relaxes and makes you chill, but will get you maniacal from the pleasures. It is definitely a faster point to point machine than it might appear. The technology, love or hate it, is there in spades and includes ride-by-wire throttle, several electronic safety systems, multi-modes to corral the Testastretta wallop and dual displays for God knows why. A mortal sin is the keyless ignition - a nonsense. Another is machine width, which kind of made it impossible to efficiently lane split. The Diavel is a new, perhaps controversial, branch on Ducati’s evolutionary tree, but a significant one. The non-compromising approach by the designers and engineers has made a sophisticated and capable machine that needs to be ridden to be properly appreciated. It will not be to everyone’s liking, but the lure of the dark side, which is now available in traditional red for the Australian market, may be the elixir for many evils. God bless the Diavel?
  • CUSHIONING THE RIDE.

    Citroen and Britain go back a long way. Early Citroens were first sold here just after the first World War, from 1919. They quickly endeared themselves to UK drivers, and by 1923 there were already over 23,000 of the cars on British roads. Then, for almost 40 years, from 1926 until 1965, British-made Citroens were produced in a factory in Slough. We Brits are still major consumers of Citroen products, as the third largest market in the world for the cars, behind only China, and Citroen’s native France. There is another very strong Anglo-French link. For the past 18 months, Citroen’s global boss has been a British chief executive, who also happens to be one of the most senior women in the motor industry worldwide. Linda Jackson, former managing director of Citroen UK, runs the company from its Paris base and is shaping its future with some radical plans. Briefly back in Britain on a day trip via Eurostar, she revealed her strategy for driving the company forward and restoring some of its past glory. This is, after all, the brand with some very notable models in its 96-year history, such as the pioneering Traction Avant, the unforgettable 2CV, and the remarkable Ami 6. Citroens used to be known for their quirkiness, a characteristic that had evaporated in a couple of generations of rather bland models, but has recently been revived in the much more characterful Citroen C4 Cactus, with its distinctive body-protecting airbumps. Initial plans to build 70,000 units a year has proved overly modest, and current C4 Cactus production is running at 110,000 per annum. So can we expect more of the same in future models? Yes, says Linda Jackson. Although it is hard to quantify within a largely French-speaking company, as there is no direct translation in French for the word quirky. “The success of the C4 Cactus shows you can have a vehicle that stands out and be successful with it,” comments Linda. “We have never been successful when we try to be like everyone else. It’s a gamble to be quirky, but it’s what we are doing.” Something else for which Citroen has traditionally been known is the magic carpet ride quality of its famed hydropneumatic suspension, although more recently a hydraulic system on the current C5 has sought to deliver a modern version of cushioning ride comfort. But now Citroen is on the brink of revealing a revolutionary new suspension system that Linda says will be exclusive to the French firm, and will eventually become standard right across the range. It will appear on the first new model in 2017. For the moment she is a bit cagey about the specifics, whether it will be a self-levelling design, or some kind of air suspension system, but she promises it will take Citroen back to its roots of admirable ‘floating’ ride comfort, while maintaining good body control for handling precision. “Comfort is a core value of the Citroen brand, and this is our way to recreate the benefits of the hydropneumatic set-up in a more modern, more appropriate way,” she told us. Meanwhile, she is busy with bold plans to slim the Citroen range from its current 14 different body styles to a more rational seven core designs based around three platforms. It’s intended to make the brand both leaner and fitter, and also better structured for customers to appreciate what Citroen is about. So how does a British boss go down in an iconic French company? Pretty well so far. A clear direction and plans to resurrect some of what made past Citroens special is winning her respect. They’re even quite kind about her A-level-based ability to speak French. “They say I have an accent like Jane Birkin,” says an amused Linda.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
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