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CMC Varica

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CMC Varica - information: CMC Varica is a very good car, that was released by "CMC" company. We collected the best 12 photos of CMC Varica on this page.

Brand Name CMC
Model CMC Varica
Number of views 32383 views
Model's Rate 8.5 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • TOYOTA LAND CRUISER INVINCIBLE 2.8 D-4D AUTOMATIC.

    When you’ve got a vehicle in your lineup as legendary as the Land Cruiser, the key to success is continuous evolution. Small improvements dotted throughout the model’s life will ensure that you have something new for customers that change their car regularly. This approach, Toyota has got down to a fine art, with the latest car benefiting from a brand new 174bhp 2.8-litre D-4D engine and six-speed automatic transmission that meets the latest Euro-6 emissions regulations. Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are both improved - up by 3.3mpg and down by 19g/km, respectively - but power and torque figures are disappointingly less than before. But despite the power cut, the on-road driving experience is enhanced compared to before. Performance is adequate, and while the engine is chattery from cold, it settles down a fair bit when warmed through. You’ll still hear it, especially when you floor the throttle, but at motorway speeds it settles down to a low roar, while road and wind noise are kept reasonably well in check. There’s a vagueness to the steering, however, cornering prowess is pretty good, with low levels of lean through bends, and generous amounts of grip. A choice of ‘comfort’ or ‘sport’ modes for the suspension means that things get too bouncy and wallowy in the former setting, but nicely firmed up in the latter, with all but the deepest of potholes and severest of undulations soaked up well, making the Sport mode the setting of choice for us. Off road, show the Land Cruiser a muddy field or a heavily rutted track and it’ll eat it up and spit it out - its mug plugging prowess far exceeds its ability on the road. The interior of the Land Cruiser has been steadily improved over time, with better and better materials used along the way. The majority of the plastics are of the soft-touch variety and all of the fixtures and fittings feel like they’ve been screwed together nicely and will stand up to a lifetime’s worth of abuse. The wood trim seems outdated to us, while the steering wheel would be better if it was covered entirely in leather, rather than having the slippery feel of the wood. Controls for the four-wheel-drive system dominate the centre console, with all of the buttons logically arranged up high on the dashboard. The navigation screen is ideally placed and easy to use, with clear and colourful graphics. Visibility is generally good all around the car thanks to its square shape and good sized windows, though the rear wiper is next to useless due to the small area that it wipes. Park it in tight spaces and you’ll curse the side opening tailgate, and wish that it had a more conventional up and over arrangement. The space available is also smaller than most rivals, despite the vehicle’s obvious bulk. Oddment space is well catered for thanks to a large cubby hole underneath the armrest, decently sized door pockets and glovebox, and a pair of cupholders. Even with a sunroof fitted, headroom is pretty good both front and rear, and back seat passengers will be impressed by the amount of knee room. The usual caveats apply when it comes to using the sixth and seventh seat in the back, with passengers likely to want the journey to be as short as possible, unless they’re a youngster.
  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro.

    You’ve probably already read about Audi’s grand plans for electrification of its model range, and soon it’ll have a second plug-in hybrid model to sell alongside the A3 e-tron launched earlier in the year. This time around the German firm has taken a different route, pairing the 3.0-litre TDI engine from the Q7 with a 126bhp electric motor, which together develop a mighty 369bhp and 516lb ft of torque. Owners will be able to travel up to around 34 miles, depending on the climate, which Audi reckons will be just enough for the daily commute to and from work for the average motorist. Three intelligent driving modes - EV, hybrid and battery hold - can work in tandem with the navigation system for best efficiency thanks to what Audi calls a predictive efficiency assistant. The price tag for all of this technology has yet to be revealed, but is expected to be Ј60k after Government grants, which is a hefty premium over the regular diesel editions. For anyone that’s expecting to see a whole load of electronic trickery, you’ll be disappointed, because the Q7 e-tron looks decidedly like any other diesel Q7, though the instruments have been altered to take into account of the electric motor, including the excellent Virtual Cockpit fitted to our test car. Beautifully finished, soft-touch materials are used throughout the cabin, delivering a high quality ambience. While the driving position is suitably command-like, the height of the dashboard is relatively low and so isn’t quite as imposing as other large SUVs. Supportive seats, a wide range of adjustments to both the chairs and the steering wheel mean that just about anyone can get a comfortable driving position. The cabin is simply huge, and whereas conventionally powered Q7s come with seven-seats as standard, due to the hybrid gubbins, there’s just five here. But that’s just fine as there’s generous space to spread out both front and rear. Boot space is inevitably smaller, but just 120 litre have been lost due to electrification. That still leaves a sizeable 650 litres with the seats up, and an expansive 1,835 litres with the chairs down. Performance is effortless, with smooth, linear acceleration no matter which source of power is being used. While in electric-mode, it’s eerily quiet, with only a distant sound from the tyres to be heard. The engine cuts in almost imperceptibly, with none of the vibrations that rival hybrids were afflicted with. Even with the diesel engine in action, sounds are nicely muted, with the cabin of the Q7 a calm place to travel. There’s a fluid feel to the steering with nice weighting that allows for accurate, precise cornering, and despite its bulk, this e-tron Q7 feels relatively light on its wheels. It handles flatly with little sign of body roll, backed up with huge amounts of grip. The only fly in the ointment is that of brake pedal feel that at times doesn’t inspire total confidence. Ride comfort is impressive, delivering a magic carpet-like ride from its adjustable adaptive suspension.
  • Cops chase new cars.

    MERCEDES-Benz, Audi, BMW, Volvo, Subaru and Volkswagen are on Australian police force wish lists as the search begins for a highway patrol car to replace the current fleet of locally produced Holdens and Fords. SUVs are shaping as the likely participants in future highspeed chases as local police look to follow the high-riding road travelled by American cops. The Subaru Forester tS, Mercedes-AMG GLA45, BMW X3 and Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT are all being considered following the release of a detailed set of draft “national vehicle specifications” for pursuit cars as replacements for the Commodore SS and Falcon XR6 Turbo/XR8. Each achieves the police target of accelerating to 100km/h in less than 7.5sec while providing space for gear and people. SUVs also provide better ground clearance for hopping median strips or driving on the verges of country roads. And the extra traction of all-wheel drive provides reassurance - and pace - in slippery conditions. Police insiders Wheels spoke to confirmed SUVs were one option being considered. Victoria Police has already purchased some Grand Cherokee SRTs for use in undercover work. BMW produces police versions of its 2 Series Gran Tourer, 3 Series, 5 Series, X1, X3 and X5 for emergency services around the world. “We’re definitely interested in it … we are speaking to the police at the moment,” BMW Australia director of corporate affairs Lenore Fletcher said. “We have many high-powered performance vehicles - including X models - that would be well suited to police work.” MB Australia senior manager of corporate communications David McCarthy said the chances of a GLA45 AMG pursuit car would depend on supply. “If they want the cars, we have to be able to provide the volume,” he said, adding that Mercedes would not produce a specific trim or tune for police. “We’re not going to reduce the spec … that can have implications on used-car prices and the brand image.” Wheels understands police have pressured some manufacturers to take out luxury components to make cars more affordable, but most brands appear reluctant. Police are also asking for modifications - including electronics, pre-drilled holes in the roof and the fitment of full-sized spare tyres - from the factory, something that may not be feasible for many models. Police are also considering high-performance sedans and wagons for highway patrol duties, including the Volvo S60 Polestar, Audi A4/S4, BMW 3 Series and Volkswagen Golf R. While, on the surface, the chances of a Mercedes, BMW, Audi or Volvo police car may seem slim due to their premium price tags, police are keen to consider the whole-of-life cost of all vehicles. Given that depreciation is typically the single biggest cost of any new vehicle, some police jurisdictions are pushing their accounting departments to consider resale values, servicing costs and low fuel use, potentially opening the door to more luxurious alternatives. As part of the draft requirements - which Wheels has seen - police are also probing carmakers as to “the extent that the manufacturer can modify or build vehicles to meet the draft specifications”. Overseas, Mercedes and BMWs are relatively common for police use, and BMW even has a range of ‘Authority’ models designed specifically for emergency services.
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