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Coles Hydra Truck 80/88 T

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Coles Hydra Truck 80/88 T - information: Coles Hydra Truck 80/88 T is a very good car, that was released by "Coles" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Coles Hydra Truck 80/88 T on this page.

Brand Name Coles
Model Coles Hydra Truck 80/88 T
Number of views 78424 views
Model's Rate 9.5 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Suzuki SX4 S-Cross 1.6 DDiS Automatic.

    Suzuki’s SX4 S-Cross has been around for a couple of years and has earned a quiet following for blending a practical interior with a certain amount of driving flair, all at a reasonable price. What it’s never had, and no Suzuki for the last 22 years has had, is an automatic gearbox allied with a diesel engine, or at least a proper one rather than a continuously variable transmission. This combination accounts for 16 per cent of sales in the compact SUV market, so Suzuki is keen to tap in to that extra revenue stream by launching an automatic gearbox option for the existing diesel engine. The gearbox uses a twin-clutch setup to engage odd or even gears in advance, depending on whether the driver is accelerating or braking, ensuring a smooth and instantaneous shift of the next required gear. In use it operates exactly as you would expect an automatic gearbox to work, although it’s technically an automated manual system - hydraulics control the clutch and gearshift in the background, leaving you with nothing to do but play with the steering wheel mounted paddles, should you wish to take over control yourself. Systems of this nature are often a tad rough, but Suzuki’s version is remarkably smooth. Each gear is selected without fuss, and there’s no clunking through the system as the clutch is engaged. It’s not notably quick, despite the claims of instant shifting, but the short pause between ratios would only be a problem if this SUV was a more sporting proposition. Not that the S-Cross can’t handle bends. It can, and probably better than you have any right to expect, but it’s never particularly involving or rewarding. Allgrip four-wheel-drive is standard on this edition, with the electronic gadgetry splitting the power between each wheel, and allowing you to get further in tricky conditions than a conventional two-wheel-drive SUV will allow you. Driving to the top of Ben Nevis might be beyond it, due to ground clearance issues, but you’ll certainly make it home when the snow starts falling. The extra weight of the gearbox hits economy slightly, with a meagre 1.4mpg drop compared to the manual version, but the end result is a still an impressive 62.8mpg on the combined cycle. And that doesn’t appear to be an entirely unrealistic figure either, with 50+mpg in normal use being easily achievable while on test. There’s no extra weight on the inside, with disappointingly lightweight plastics making up the bland, but inoffensive dashboard. And with a long list of standard equipment included within the price, there’s not a shortage of space for the driver to enjoy all of the functions. The S-Cross feels light and airy inside, at least up front, but it gets a bit tighter for headroom in the rear. The boot is class competitive, swallowing exactly the same 430 litres of luggage as Nissan’s Qashqai, and is similarly comparable to SsangYong’s new Tivoli. The SX4 S-Cross comes loaded with equipment, offers excellent real-world economy and has the extra traction and reassurance afforded by four-wheeldrive. It might not be the most exciting model in the segment, or even the class leader, but it offers excellent value for money in a generally pleasing package.
  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro.

    You’ve probably already read about Audi’s grand plans for electrification of its model range, and soon it’ll have a second plug-in hybrid model to sell alongside the A3 e-tron launched earlier in the year. This time around the German firm has taken a different route, pairing the 3.0-litre TDI engine from the Q7 with a 126bhp electric motor, which together develop a mighty 369bhp and 516lb ft of torque. Owners will be able to travel up to around 34 miles, depending on the climate, which Audi reckons will be just enough for the daily commute to and from work for the average motorist. Three intelligent driving modes - EV, hybrid and battery hold - can work in tandem with the navigation system for best efficiency thanks to what Audi calls a predictive efficiency assistant. The price tag for all of this technology has yet to be revealed, but is expected to be Ј60k after Government grants, which is a hefty premium over the regular diesel editions. For anyone that’s expecting to see a whole load of electronic trickery, you’ll be disappointed, because the Q7 e-tron looks decidedly like any other diesel Q7, though the instruments have been altered to take into account of the electric motor, including the excellent Virtual Cockpit fitted to our test car. Beautifully finished, soft-touch materials are used throughout the cabin, delivering a high quality ambience. While the driving position is suitably command-like, the height of the dashboard is relatively low and so isn’t quite as imposing as other large SUVs. Supportive seats, a wide range of adjustments to both the chairs and the steering wheel mean that just about anyone can get a comfortable driving position. The cabin is simply huge, and whereas conventionally powered Q7s come with seven-seats as standard, due to the hybrid gubbins, there’s just five here. But that’s just fine as there’s generous space to spread out both front and rear. Boot space is inevitably smaller, but just 120 litre have been lost due to electrification. That still leaves a sizeable 650 litres with the seats up, and an expansive 1,835 litres with the chairs down. Performance is effortless, with smooth, linear acceleration no matter which source of power is being used. While in electric-mode, it’s eerily quiet, with only a distant sound from the tyres to be heard. The engine cuts in almost imperceptibly, with none of the vibrations that rival hybrids were afflicted with. Even with the diesel engine in action, sounds are nicely muted, with the cabin of the Q7 a calm place to travel. There’s a fluid feel to the steering with nice weighting that allows for accurate, precise cornering, and despite its bulk, this e-tron Q7 feels relatively light on its wheels. It handles flatly with little sign of body roll, backed up with huge amounts of grip. The only fly in the ointment is that of brake pedal feel that at times doesn’t inspire total confidence. Ride comfort is impressive, delivering a magic carpet-like ride from its adjustable adaptive suspension.
  • 2016 DUCATIS.

    Ducati has unveiled its updated Hypermotard and Scrambler lines for 2016. The Hypermotard models receive larger engines that are more powerful and meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, while the Scrambler line expands with the addition of a Flat Track Pro version and the 399cc Sixty2. The company also introduced an updated “Supermid” 959 Panigale, which you can read about elsewhere in this issue. The three models in the Hypermotard lineup-the base Hypermotard, the SP, and the Hyperstrada-receive a larger engine that also meets stringent Euro 4 emissions standards. Bore has been increased from 88mm to 94mm, with a corresponding increase in displacement to 937cc, this despite the models now being referred to as the Hypermotard 939 and Hyperstrada 939. Other updates include an increased compression ratio (from 12.8:1 to 13.1:1) and a redesigned 2-into-1 exhaust system. Maximum power is now 113 hp (slightly up from the previous model’s 110 hp), and torque is up by 10 percent. The Hypermotard’s chassis is unchanged from the previous model, and other features such as the Ducati Safety Pack, three-level ABS, traction control, and riding modes all carry over. In the Scrambler line, the four versions produced last year carry on and are joined by the Flat Track Pro, which is based on the Full Throttle but has side-mounted number plates, a small-nose fairing, and other Ducati accessories such as machined footpegs. As with the Full Throttle, the Flat Track Pro has a Termignoni exhaust as standard. The Sixty2 is a more affordable Scrambler, with a smaller engine derived from the 803cc mill producing 41 hp, which Ducati says will make the bike more accessible for newer riders. The Sixty2 has slightly different brakes and suspension, helping to lower cost to $7,995. The Multistrada 1200 Pikes Peak returns for 2016 after a year off, and the Multistrada line expands further with a more dirt-oriented Enduro model. The Diavel line also grows, with cruiser versions dubbed the XDiavel and XDiavel S added.
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