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Colt 1200

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Colt 1200 - information: Colt 1200 is a very good car, that was released by "Colt" company. We collected the best 5 photos of Colt 1200 on this page.

Brand Name Colt
Model Colt 1200
Number of views 37969 views
Model's Rate 9.2 out of 10
Number of images 5 images
Interesting News
  • Holden’s secret project.

    MEET the top-secret show-stopper that started life in Holden’s Port Melbourne design studios in the middle of 2015. The eye-catching Opel GT Concept, which is shaping up to be one of the stars of the Geneva motor show (March 3-13), was designed in Europe but is a product of Holden’s secret fabrication group, one of only two in the General Motors world that can create one-off show stars. The radical two-door coupe sits on a unique rear-drive platform that gives it the driver-focused nous to take on the COTY-winning Mazda MX-5 and 2012 winners the Toyota 86/Subaru BRZ twins. Described as a “template for future sports cars”, the GT Concept from GM’s European brands is targeted to weigh less than 1000kg. It’s built on a bespoke reardrive platform and uses GM’s new all-aluminium 1.0-litre three-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine, producing 107kW and 205Nm. It drives through a sixspeed sequential gearbox and accelerates to 100km/h in “under eight seconds” on the way to a maximum of 215km/h. The unusual styling is described by GM Europe design chief Mark Adams as “purebred, pared down, yet unashamedly avant-garde”. “It is dramatic, sculptural and full of innovations, which is our great tradition that we intend to continue,” Adams said. “In the mid-60s Vauxhall and Opel created their own interpretations of a lightweight sports car - the XVR and the Experimental GT - both of which were thoroughly modern with dynamic sculptural form.” While a rear-drive platform under the concept would be crucial to the production GT’s ability to battle rivals like the Toyota 86 and Mazda MX-5, GM Europe sources say it’s unlikely, and that the Barina/Corsa FWD architecture makes more business sense. The company hopes to gather more market intelligence after the GT is unveiled at the Geneva show. One insider said the GT Concept shows the company’s direction: “Like the new (European) Astra, this car continues with the theme of making a car that is no bigger than it needs to be. One that is pared-down, light and no more complex than necessary.” As for a Holden version of the production car? It’s possible, especially if the GT gets the green light for sale in the UK. But the little concept car that Australia built still has a number of gates to clear before those negotiations can take place.
  • Nissan NP300 Navara.

    Pickups are at the brawny end of the car scene, utility vehicles that used to have a rough and ready image, and the structure and driving characteristics to match. In recent times they have become a lot more civilised, with big advances in creature comfort and road-going behaviour. The latest of the breed, Nissan’s new NP300 Navara - the NP stands for Nissan Pickup - is a very good example of how far down that road pickups have progressed. It is a big vehicle at five and a half metres long, and its elevated chassis means that you still need to be a tall, strong bloke to enter the cab with ease: it’s rather a physical upward haul for those of us more vertically challenged. But once installed it’s something of a revelation. All the controls are pleasantly weighted and you don’t need beefy muscles to drive this latest generation of Navara. It has undergone a mechanical transformation, with the rather rustic leafspring suspension of the previous model now replaced by more sophisticated coil springs, while the previous 2.5-litre dCi engine has been superseded by a more efficient 2.3-litre dCi unit with either 161 or 188bhp power outputs. Both changes bring big benefits. The new Navara has taut and tidy handling, but without undue body lean, and it also rides impressively well with some of the most cushioned comfort of any of the current crop of modern pickups. Strong performance doesn’t come with a noise penalty, and refinement is very good indeed for a vehicle of this type. Gearbox choice is six-speed manual or a seven-speed automatic transmission, and both have well-spaced ratios and a slick action. There are two body styles, the King Cab that is popular in some other markets, with shorter, rear-opening back doors and a basic bench back seat, and the Double Cab that is generally preferred here in the UK and has four full-size conventional doors and fully comfortable back seats. There is nothing rustic about interior comfort, it is on a par with a well-appointed five-seater family hatchback. It’s amply spacious and not cramped. Cabin quality has taken a quantum leap forward over the old model, with tactile materials, an elegantly styled dashboard layout and a level of fit and finish that would not disgrace a prestige-nudging saloon. Large door pockets, some well-placed central cubbyholes and a handy dashboard-top tray means there are enough places to put all your on-the-move oddments. There are five grades of trim, starting with Visia and rising through Acenta, Acenta+, N-Connecta and topping out with Tekna. All versions come with a fair level of standard kit, including Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity, electric windows, cruise control, automatic headlights, electric door mirrors, LED rear lights, and air conditioning on all four-wheel-drive models. Move up the range to Acenta trim and 16-inch alloy wheels are fitted, as well as keyless entry and start and chrome embellishments. Acenta+ versions feature 18-inch alloy wheels, climate control, rear privacy glass, reversing camera, front fog lights, leather steering wheel and gearknob, as well as heated door mirrors with power folding. In N-Connecta trim, as tested, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system is included, and there’s DAB digital radio and Bluetooth audio streaming, while choosing Tekna versions includes leather upholstery, roof rails, LED headlights and daytime running lights, rear parking sensors, a 360 degree camera system and heated and electric driver’s seat. A rear differential lock is optional on all models except the entrylevel Visia trim, while an electric sunroof is available on Tekna versions at extra cost. The new NP300 Navara shows how far pickups have come in recent years. From the outside this is still a large, beefy workhorse, albeit one with sleeker curves than before. From the inside, and in its driving manners, you could think yourself at the wheel of an upper-crust SUV. Nissan has done a good job of significantly upping its game with this one.
  • Suzuki SX4 S-Cross 1.6 DDiS Automatic.

    Suzuki’s SX4 S-Cross has been around for a couple of years and has earned a quiet following for blending a practical interior with a certain amount of driving flair, all at a reasonable price. What it’s never had, and no Suzuki for the last 22 years has had, is an automatic gearbox allied with a diesel engine, or at least a proper one rather than a continuously variable transmission. This combination accounts for 16 per cent of sales in the compact SUV market, so Suzuki is keen to tap in to that extra revenue stream by launching an automatic gearbox option for the existing diesel engine. The gearbox uses a twin-clutch setup to engage odd or even gears in advance, depending on whether the driver is accelerating or braking, ensuring a smooth and instantaneous shift of the next required gear. In use it operates exactly as you would expect an automatic gearbox to work, although it’s technically an automated manual system - hydraulics control the clutch and gearshift in the background, leaving you with nothing to do but play with the steering wheel mounted paddles, should you wish to take over control yourself. Systems of this nature are often a tad rough, but Suzuki’s version is remarkably smooth. Each gear is selected without fuss, and there’s no clunking through the system as the clutch is engaged. It’s not notably quick, despite the claims of instant shifting, but the short pause between ratios would only be a problem if this SUV was a more sporting proposition. Not that the S-Cross can’t handle bends. It can, and probably better than you have any right to expect, but it’s never particularly involving or rewarding. Allgrip four-wheel-drive is standard on this edition, with the electronic gadgetry splitting the power between each wheel, and allowing you to get further in tricky conditions than a conventional two-wheel-drive SUV will allow you. Driving to the top of Ben Nevis might be beyond it, due to ground clearance issues, but you’ll certainly make it home when the snow starts falling. The extra weight of the gearbox hits economy slightly, with a meagre 1.4mpg drop compared to the manual version, but the end result is a still an impressive 62.8mpg on the combined cycle. And that doesn’t appear to be an entirely unrealistic figure either, with 50+mpg in normal use being easily achievable while on test. There’s no extra weight on the inside, with disappointingly lightweight plastics making up the bland, but inoffensive dashboard. And with a long list of standard equipment included within the price, there’s not a shortage of space for the driver to enjoy all of the functions. The S-Cross feels light and airy inside, at least up front, but it gets a bit tighter for headroom in the rear. The boot is class competitive, swallowing exactly the same 430 litres of luggage as Nissan’s Qashqai, and is similarly comparable to SsangYong’s new Tivoli. The SX4 S-Cross comes loaded with equipment, offers excellent real-world economy and has the extra traction and reassurance afforded by four-wheeldrive. It might not be the most exciting model in the segment, or even the class leader, but it offers excellent value for money in a generally pleasing package.
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