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Daewoo BS 105 DS

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Daewoo BS 105 DS - information: Daewoo BS 105 DS is a very good car, that was released by "Daewoo" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Daewoo BS 105 DS on this page.

Brand Name Daewoo
Model Daewoo BS 105 DS
Number of views 112470 views
Model's Rate 8.1 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • Kia Optima.

    Anyone asked to pen an obituary for the outgoing Kia Optima would probably write something like "nice-looking car; shame about the CO2 emissions, refinement and trim quality". Which is pretty much what customers said, and a good starting point for Kia when getting down to work on the new one. But that's not all. For a while, Kia has been dragging its feet in the areas of connectivity and advanced driver assistance features. Both of those have also been addressed. And there will be greater choice, with sportier-looking GT-Line versions for the first time. The Optima's good looks have been further polished, and there's more passenger and cargo room thanks to a longer wheelbase, higher roof line and wider cockpit. For now, the UK line-up will again be diesel only, though a plug-in hybrid will be added in 2016. The diesel engine is a Euro-6 emissions compliant version of the 1.7-litre CRDi unit from the previous Optima, developing more power (139bhp instead of 134) and extra torque (251lb ft versus 240). Maximum torque arrives earlier in the rev band, too - at 1,750rpm rather than 2,000. Vitally, it also produces lower emissions - down by 14 per cent to 110g/km for the six-speed manual gearbox, and by a massive 27 per cent to 116g/km with the seven-speed twin-clutch automatic transmission, which replaces the former six-speed torque converter unit. That lowers the tax burden on company car users by three and eight bands respectively. And if that's not enough, Kia is promising greater refinement, a smoother ride and a more engaging drive. Those promises have largely been kept. It takes only a few hundred yards to appreciate the improved driveability of the revised engine (just follow the guidance of the gearshift indicator to see how much more driverfriendly it is) and its greater smoothness and more dulcet tones. With the new automatic gearbox, it's even better, and given that it raises benefit-in-kind tax by only one band over than the manual car, Kia can envisage a fair take-up. There's less wind noise (no gaps in the door seals any more, and better windscreen mountings), although the claimed improvements in road noise are surfacedependent. The same can be said for the ride, though the heavily revised suspension mostly does its job well. A relocated power steering pump makes the car a bit more adroit, too. The real joy for business users who might have to spend hours behind the wheel, however, will come from the plusher interior, more shapely seats (though the cushions might be just a bit too hard for some after a while) and more premium equipment options. A TomTom equipped navigation system with connected services will be standard, through a seven-inch screen with impressively clear graphics set at exactly the same height as the instruments. The pared-down switchgear is set lower in a horizontally orientated dash, and looks very BMW reminiscent. All versions of the Optima feature a reversing camera, dual-zone climate control, cruise control, speed limiter, power folding and heated mirrors, DAB digital radio and Bluetooth connectivity, as well as 17-inch alloy wheels, LED daytime running lights, tyre pressure monitors, and electric hand brake and hill start assist. Move up to level 3 and you get a larger eight-inch navigation screen, electric driver’s seat, heated front chairs, xenon headlights and 18-inch alloy wheels, as well as extra chrome for the exterior, half leather seats, an uprated instrument cluster, a Harmon Kardon premium sound system and LED front fog lights and rear tail light clusters. Right at the top-of-the-range, the new level 4 equipment level includes wireless mobile phone charging, a 360- degree camera system, automated parking, blind spot detection, rear cross traffic alert, a lane keeping assistant, as well as high beam assist, speed limit detection, autonomous emergency braking and adaptive cruise control. Leather upholstery is also included within the price tag, as well as ventilated front seats and heated rear outer chairs, and a panoramic glass sunroof. GT-Line versions will fall somewhere in the middle, with final specifications to be confirmed when it is launched later in 2016.
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
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