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De Tomaso Guar

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De Tomaso Guar - information: De Tomaso Guar is a very good car, that was released by "De Tomaso" company. We collected the best 5 photos of De Tomaso Guar on this page.

Brand Name De Tomaso
Model De Tomaso Guar
Number of views 105475 views
Model's Rate 6.1 out of 10
Number of images 5 images
Interesting News
  • SsangYong Turismo.

    Most of the column inches about SsangYong have been concerning its brand new baby crossover, the Tivoli, a newcomer that has contributed to a doubling of sales during 2015. But in the background, away from the headlines, the Korean firm has been busy updating some of the older members of the line-up, too, with the introduction of a brand-new Euro-6 emissions compliant 2.2-litre diesel engine in the Korando, Rexton and Turismo. Here we test it in SsangYong’s gargantuan MPV, which last year received a general spruce up. Our test car is the flagship of the line-up, the fourwheel- drive ELX paired to a new sevenspeed Mercedes-Benz-sourced sevenspeed automatic transmission, which at Ј24,995, including the fantastic five-year limitless warranty, is an absolute bargain. The Turismo dwarfs any other car that it parks alongside. Its sheer bulk translates into a massive amount of space, with the cabin configured in a two-two-three seating arrangement, with generous space for seven occupants to spread out in all directions. The rear bench seat slides fore and aft, and there’s also sufficient room for luggage for all passengers, too, which is a rarity in this segment. The design of the cabin has fallen behind the latest trends, and the large centrally mounted dials can be difficult to read in poor light. There’s a mixture of both soft and hard surfaces, and an overriding feeling of solidity, though it all looks just a little bit dated. The instruments ahead of the driver look like a 1980s computer game, for instance. You’re sat up high in a command-like position, and allround visibility is excellent thanks to large, deep windows. The seats are comfortable enough, though they do lack lateral support when cornering. Storage space is well thought out, with drinks holders in the door pockets, a deep armrest and a decent area in front of the gear lever. And you can tell from the double coin holders that SsangYong’s got the Turismo’s market clearly defined, and that’s as a taxi. Despite its weight, the 2.2-litre Turismo is surprisingly sprightly off the line. The engine is quiet and never sounds strained, no matter how many revs you pile on. Developing 176bhp and 295lb ft of torque, there’s 15 per cent more power, and torque is up 11 per cent compared to the outgoing engine. The foot operated park brake is outdated, and despite the seven-speed automatic transmission being new, there are occasions when it is slow to change gear. While it’s certainly not the most agile car to drive, in view of its numb steering, it’s pleasing that there’s an almost total absence of body roll when cornering. Grip levels on account of the standard four-wheel-drive system are high, and the suspension delivers a floaty experience that seems adept at soaking up the worst of the lumps and bumps that are present on the UK’s roads. Finally, with a two-tonne towing capacity, this all-wheel-drive MPV should shrug off hauling a large caravan or motorboat with ease.
  • DUCATI 1299 PANIGALES.

    I missed the opportunity to test the regular Ducati 1299 Panigale earlier in the year but first impressions of the 1299 Panigale S are very positive. Jumping on, the bike is tall with an easy reach to the ground even for my 180cm height, reach to the bars is aggressive and the pegs are relatively tall. Taking the Panigale S through my usual testing route the first thing that impressed me was just how planted the bike is, even over relatively poor road surfaces the bike just feels like it’s glued to the road, with great feel front and rear. It’s still very firm, but the semiactive mode takes the bite out of the bumps and as a result the real kick experienced in the old 1199 that was so punishing, to your bum, spine and kidneys, is gone. The S is quite agile, with neutral steering that doesn’t exactly require muscling but does require concentration and thought about where you want to go. Changing your line mid-corner is easy and it really does feel like you’re on rails, regardless of your speed. I’d say it’s similar to the 899 Panigale, on which you don’t notice the effort that goes into handling until you jump on something that feels noticeably quicker steering. That’s not a criticism though, just an observation. The Brembo EVO M50 brake calipers on the front are also extremely strong, not in an off-putting fashion but I did find it easier to use the awesome Ducati Quick Shifter with auto-blipper to drop down a gear to wash off some speed. Talking of power the engine is a belter, down low the 1285cc L-twin is lumpy and you can just about roll along at 19km/h in first without clutch but it’s not pleasant, but that does smooth out rapidly as you reach higher into the revs. The fueling and throttle response are both super smooth and responsive, with Sport providing a smoother power delivery and throttle response than Race and power is just explosive. It’s also seriously loud with the two-into-two system with the stock stainless mufflers in the belly and I thought I might pop an eardrum when I rode into our underground garage a bit too vigorously! What did stand out is just how heavy the clutch lever is, it felt like fighting a bear trap when I got caught in really heavy traffic and was having to use it frequently. The DQS on the other hand means that in anything except stop-start traffic you aren’t using the clutch constantly. The Panigale 1299 S certainly has the goods to justify a model suffix, with its full LED lighting, carbon-fibre front guard and auxiliary adjustment buttons adding to the awesome Panigale package. But what really conveys the value of the premium price of $34,990 plus on roads is the full Ohlins suspension, using the Ohlins Smart EC semi-active suspension system for both the NIX30 forks and TTX36 rear shock, as well as an Ohlins steering damper, while further communicating with the Bosch Inertia Platform - which provides cornering ABS and greater traction control refinement. Not only this but the system can actually be run in Fixed mode, which turns off the semiactive suspension and allows full adjustability, just like in a traditional system.
  • 2016 YAMAHAS.

    New, More Affordable R1S If there is any one downside to the continued evolution of sportbikes it’s cost: The more advanced production motorcycles become, the more expensive they become as well. And while for some that trade-off is justifiable, there are still those consumers who simply aren’t willing to gut their bank account for the exotic materials and technologies that make modern motorcycles the track weapons they are today. For those consumers, Yamaha has introduced its YZF-R1S, which uses cost-effective materials to cut the suggested retail price of the otherwise stellar R1 by $1,500, to “just” $14,990. If your immediate thought is that Yamaha must have taken everything that made the R1 great and thrown it out the door (electronics included), then rest assured that’s not necessarily the case. Instead, with the R1S, Yamaha has gone in and replaced the titanium connecting rods with steel ones and magnesium outer parts and fasteners like the oil pan and right-side engine covers to aluminum ones. Engine cover bolts are now steel instead of aluminum, while wheels are now manufactured from aluminum instead of magnesium and wrapped in Bridgestone Battlax S20 sport tires instead of the R1/R1M’s trackday-intentioned RS10s. The exhaust header piping is also now made from stainless steel rather than titanium. The overall result of all this material swapping is a 9-pound jump in claimed curb weight. The R1/R1M’s MotoGP-inspired electronics package with power modes, traction control, slide control, launch control, and wheelie control goes untouched, though on the R1S, the quickshifter will come as an option rather than as standard equipment. There are a few other changes, including updates to the ECU that are intended to suit the new engine specification. The switch to steel connecting rods from titanium in the R1S means the redline needed to be reduced, the result being slightly less top-end power than the standard R1. Yamaha has yet to quote any numbers, but in published dyno charts (which are devoid of any numbers), it appears that the R1S’s redline is at 12,500 rpm instead of the R1’s 14,000 rpm, with the power loss at the very top around 5 or so horsepower. The R1S is available in either a red/white/ black color scheme or matte gray motif, and the bike is expected to be available beginning in February. New XSR 900 and Updated FJR 1300 The growing “hipster/caf? racer” culture is catching the attention of the OEMs, with Yamaha and its new XSR900 for 2016 being the latest example. The XSR retains the FZ-09’s excellent 847cc crossplane three-cylinder engine and Controlled Filling Die-Cast aluminum frame and swingarm with adjustable KYB suspension but adds styling components and details that harken back to the “heritage, authenticity, and simplicity” of the sporting motorcycles from the ’70s and ’80s. The XSR gets the FZ’s three YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) riding modes, but it also gets a two-level (plus off) traction control system as well as ABS as standard equipment. An assist/ slipper clutch eases lever effort by a claimed 20 percent while also helping to smooth out downshifts. Everything else mechanically (save for suspension settings) is basically identical to the FZ. Ergonomically, the XSR’s 32.7-inch seat height is 15mm higher than the FZ’s, and the rider’s seating position is moved 50mm rearward to make for a slightly more aggressive riding posture. Styling is the XSR’s main focus. There’s plenty of nice metal bracketry and components where plastic or other materials would normally be used. For example, the nice-looking fuel tank cover on the matte gray/ aluminum version (there’s also one in the 60th Anniversary yellow/black traditional Yamaha motif) is a brushed-aluminum piece that Yamaha says has an actual hand-buffed finish. A single round halogen headlight is held by aluminum brackets, and a round LED taillight mounted atop a metal (aluminum) fender replicate the look of the ’70s caf? racer. The seat features burgundy-colored faux suede leather panels and red stitching. The single round instrument gauge recalls the older style in shape, but in function it jumps to present-day technology with a full LCD info panel. All told, the XSR900 comes in 16 pounds heavier than the FZ-09 according to Yamaha, at a claimed 430 pounds full of fuel. The matte gray/aluminum XSR900 will be available in April, while the 60th Anniversary version will be available slightly later this year in May. Also new for 2016 from Yamaha is the latest FJR1300, in both A (standard) and ES (Electronic Suspension) models. The biggest change for both editions is a six-speed transmission replacing the old five-speed, with a slipper/assist clutch. A new LED headlight and taillight along with slightly revised bodywork complete the revisions for the A model, while the ES gets all that plus a new “lean-angle sensitive” cornering LED light setup that uses three LEDs on each side above the quad-element headlights that light up progressively as the bike leans to more effectively illuminate the road ahead in corners. The 2016 FJR will be available in March; no prices for either the new FJR1300 or XSR900 were available at press time.
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