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Eagle 2000 GTX

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Eagle 2000 GTX - information: Eagle 2000 GTX is a very good car, that was released by "Eagle" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Eagle 2000 GTX on this page.

Brand Name Eagle
Model Eagle 2000 GTX
Number of views 104809 views
Model's Rate 6.1 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Cops chase new cars.

    MERCEDES-Benz, Audi, BMW, Volvo, Subaru and Volkswagen are on Australian police force wish lists as the search begins for a highway patrol car to replace the current fleet of locally produced Holdens and Fords. SUVs are shaping as the likely participants in future highspeed chases as local police look to follow the high-riding road travelled by American cops. The Subaru Forester tS, Mercedes-AMG GLA45, BMW X3 and Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT are all being considered following the release of a detailed set of draft “national vehicle specifications” for pursuit cars as replacements for the Commodore SS and Falcon XR6 Turbo/XR8. Each achieves the police target of accelerating to 100km/h in less than 7.5sec while providing space for gear and people. SUVs also provide better ground clearance for hopping median strips or driving on the verges of country roads. And the extra traction of all-wheel drive provides reassurance - and pace - in slippery conditions. Police insiders Wheels spoke to confirmed SUVs were one option being considered. Victoria Police has already purchased some Grand Cherokee SRTs for use in undercover work. BMW produces police versions of its 2 Series Gran Tourer, 3 Series, 5 Series, X1, X3 and X5 for emergency services around the world. “We’re definitely interested in it … we are speaking to the police at the moment,” BMW Australia director of corporate affairs Lenore Fletcher said. “We have many high-powered performance vehicles - including X models - that would be well suited to police work.” MB Australia senior manager of corporate communications David McCarthy said the chances of a GLA45 AMG pursuit car would depend on supply. “If they want the cars, we have to be able to provide the volume,” he said, adding that Mercedes would not produce a specific trim or tune for police. “We’re not going to reduce the spec … that can have implications on used-car prices and the brand image.” Wheels understands police have pressured some manufacturers to take out luxury components to make cars more affordable, but most brands appear reluctant. Police are also asking for modifications - including electronics, pre-drilled holes in the roof and the fitment of full-sized spare tyres - from the factory, something that may not be feasible for many models. Police are also considering high-performance sedans and wagons for highway patrol duties, including the Volvo S60 Polestar, Audi A4/S4, BMW 3 Series and Volkswagen Golf R. While, on the surface, the chances of a Mercedes, BMW, Audi or Volvo police car may seem slim due to their premium price tags, police are keen to consider the whole-of-life cost of all vehicles. Given that depreciation is typically the single biggest cost of any new vehicle, some police jurisdictions are pushing their accounting departments to consider resale values, servicing costs and low fuel use, potentially opening the door to more luxurious alternatives. As part of the draft requirements - which Wheels has seen - police are also probing carmakers as to “the extent that the manufacturer can modify or build vehicles to meet the draft specifications”. Overseas, Mercedes and BMWs are relatively common for police use, and BMW even has a range of ‘Authority’ models designed specifically for emergency services.
  • Jaguar XJ.

    It’s fair to say that the new Jaguar XE and XF have been soaking up most of the coverage about Jaguar of late, not to mention the upcoming F-Pace, set to arrive in showrooms next year. And then there’s been the Bond connection, with 007 behind the wheel of the stunning C-X75 supercar, which though once mooted for production, won’t now be built. With so much going on, it’s little surprise that the announcement of a revised XJ fell below the radar, with the first examples arriving in showrooms just about now. It’s remarkable to think that the F-Type is now Jaguar’s oldest car in its line-up, having only been launched in 2012, and arriving in showrooms during 2013. It’s a far cry from Jaguar’s line-up just a few years ago when most of the models seemed quite elderly. It’s been the hefty cash injection from Jaguar’s owners, Tata Motors, that has made the difference, ever since it bought the firm alongside Land Rover back in 2008. In excess of Ј11 billion has been invested over the past seven years, which has resulted in the transformation that we see today. And while Jaguar’s sales performance hasn’t quite lived up to the spectacular results that the Land Rover range has seen, last month’s increase in sales of 93 per cent compared to a year ago is predicted to be just the start. Much of Jaguar’s hopes are being pinned on the upcoming F-Pace crossover vehicle, though this updated XJ is set to make a small, but significant contribution thanks to important gains in the chauffeur market. Jaguar executives have been wooing big names in the professional end of the market, and it’ll mean that you’ll see more long- wheelbase XJs on the outside of the motorway instead of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The headline change in the latest XJ, apart from some modest styling changes, is the introduction of a new Euro-6 compliant 3.0- litre V6 diesel engine that develops 296bhp and a mighty 516lb ft of torque. That’s a rather useful 25bhp up on the outgoing model, not to mention the 73lb ft of torque. And yet, both CO2 emissions and fuel economy figures are improved over the previous edition, with this standard wheelbase R-Sport edition emitting 155g/km of CO2 and capable of 47.9mpg on the combined cycle. Less sporty editions manage 149g/km and 49.6mpg, an enhancement compared to the 159g/km and 46.3mpg possible on the earlier model. And this time around there’s no penalty for choosing the long-wheelbase edition, with fuel economy and CO2 emissions remaining the same. But with the vital statistics out of the way, it’s time to talk about some of the changes made to the car. New full-LED lights give the latest XJ a more distinctive quad-lighting signature at night, while a prominent, upright front grille gives a much more muscular, imposing stance. At the rear, LED technology is used to great effect to deliver a J-shape signature for the tail lights, flanked by revised bumpers, a gloss black valence and a chrome insert. A totally new, superfast infotainment system totally transforms the connectivity of the latest XJ, finally putting to rest the limitations and clunkiness of the old audio and navigation system. And finally, the model range has been revised to add a dynamic R-Sport edition, as tested here, as well as a flagship Autobiography model paired to the long-wheelbase body that elevates the XJ range past the Ј80k barrier. The cabin of the latest XJ is as special as ever. The materials are sumptuous, swathed in leather, and the wrap-around effect of the dashboard delivers a cosy, encapsulating feel. Piano black surfaces deliver a modern, sporty look, while the heavily bolstered chairs hold you in place nicely along demanding stretches of road. The air vents wouldn’t be out of place in a Rolls-Royce, giving the impression that nothing has been spared in the search for ultimate luxury. Generous adjustment to the front chairs means that you can get a really comfortable driving position, though the front seats don’t go low enough to stop the heads of taller drivers from brushing the headlining when the optional sunroof is fitted. Move to the back, and there’s a generous amount of knee and leg space and rear passengers don’t seem to suffer from headroom limitations like those in the front do. The sizeable transmission tunnel running through the centre of the car means that the XJ is best suited to two passengers sat in the back. In common with the XF, there’s theatrics in store when the car is started up, with the rotary gear selector rising up from the centre console. It’s a feature that you never tire of and adds to the special feel that every XJ delivers. Accelerate off the line and the latest 296bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine catapults you along the road faster than its predecessor. It may only be 0.2 of a second faster to 62mph, but responsiveness is improved nonetheless, no doubt helped by the extra torque on tap. It’s impressively refined at all speeds, yet delivers a pleasing growl when you bury the accelerator pedal into the bulkhead. Despite being more than five metres long, agility through tricky corners is impressive, with excellent grip and reassuringly flat handling. The steering has a pleasing weight to it, and is highly satisfying when being piloted through a challenging set of bends. It’s really good fun for such a big car, yet is utterly manoeuvrable in a city setting. The suspension of this R-Sport model errs on the firm side, no doubt, and will appeal to owners that prefer a more dynamic driving experience. A short drive of the Autobiography model rounded off the sharper edges nicely, delivering a smoother ride at all road speeds.
  • Successful Daytona debut for new 991 GT3 R.

    The new Porsche 991 GT3 R took second place in the GTD class at the 24 Hours of Daytona as Black Swan Racing gave Weissach’s new GT3-class competitor a successful customer debut in the WeatherTech USCC season opener. Nicky Catsburg, Tim Pappas, Andy Pilgrim and factory driver Patrick Long brought the no.540 entry - resplendent in a green chrome livery - home in second place, just three seconds behind the class-winning Magnus Racing Audi R8. In the wet qualifying, the no.73 Park Place Motorsport 911 GT3 R took pole position but was waylaid during the night with mechanical gremlins. The no.22 Alex Job Racing entry was the star for much of the race thanks to outstanding performances from Leh Keen, Shane van Gisbergen, Cooper MacNeil and Gunnar Jeannette, who helped to bring the WeatherTech-sponsored 911 back from a lap down to challenge for victory in the final hour. The quartet looked one of the favourites to take the win only for a rear wing problem to send van Gisbergen spinning down the order twice and require multiple stops to fix the problem. This left the no.540 machine, in the hands of Catsburg, to take the chequered flag in second after the leading Lamborghini ran out of fuel. The no.540 Black Swan Racing GT3 R nearly overcame the no.44 Audi that crossed the finish line in first place on fumes, as the GTD-class battle was ultimately decided by fuel saving and strategy.
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