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Eicher 10.60 Skyline

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Eicher 10.60 Skyline - information: Eicher 10.60 Skyline is a very good car, that was released by "Eicher" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Eicher 10.60 Skyline on this page.

Brand Name Eicher
Model Eicher 10.60 Skyline
Number of views 101683 views
Model's Rate 8.3 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • Bimota invent the techtro….

    Hands up-wedidn’t expect this. But givenBimotahavebased their newretro on theirmost contemporary, exclusive model we don’t think anyone did. TheirwildTesi 3D (Bike, Aug 2015 issue) is an engineeringmasterclass.Hub centre steering and a front swingarm separate suspension, steering and braking forces - so suspension functionswhile braking, bumps don’t affect steering, and so on. It’s amodernvisionof hewnaluminiumand hand-finishedparts. And soBimota think thismakes it perfect for some retroaction. For theRaceCafe the 3D’s angular body is swapped for a traditional profile and tiny seat unitwith the essential brown perch, and there’s the same headlight as onAriel’sAce. The 1078ccDucati V twin is swapped for the803cc Scrambler unit, with a curvy new pipe. Swingarms are un retro carbon. Stare long enough and, fromsome angles, the RaceCafe almost works… but not quite. For us, a Tesi should be all about sharp, cutting edge design. Other Bimotanews ismorepleasing. The newImpeto uses the Diavel’s bulging 1198ccTestastretta engine, anoptional blower taking peak power past 200bhp. Youcan specify a carbon frame, too. Best of all, Bimota are going back to their roots andoffering frame kits. Their BB3 canbe supplied as a rolling chassis to take the motor from a salvaged BMW S1000RR. Just like the good old days. Let’s hope the kit option extends to more models - we’d love to build our own Tesi (no brown seat).
  • Mitsubishi Shogun 3.2 DI-D SG4 LWB Automatic.

    With the launch of the 2016 model year Shoguns, the model range has been slimmed down, with the manual gearbox variants axed. A new Euro-6 compliant engine arrives, but it’s disappointing to note that it is thirstier, emits more CO2 and produces less power. Fuel economy on the combined cycle is now 30.4mpg (previously 33.2mpg), CO2 emissions rise by 21 to a hefty 245g/km, while maximum power drops by 9bhp to 188bhp. Thankfully acceleration to 62mph is preserved, even if the top speed is reduced by one mph. The loss in performance is blamed on the changes necessary to get the Shogun to pass the more stringent Euro-6 emissions regulations. What hasn’t changed is its no-nonsense go-anywhere ability and class-leading 3,500kg towing weight. The cabin of the Shogun feels solid, and even employs a smattering of soft-touch plastics, but doesn’t feel plush, mainly down to outdated switchgear and buttons. The two-tone grey and beige trim looks good, but the wood trim gives a dated ambience. The driving position is upright, with seats that are comfortable, even if they lack sufficient rearward travel for taller and bulkier drivers, while the steering wheel only adjusts for rake and not reach. Thanks to enormous mirrors and deep windows, all round vision from the driver’s seat is excellent, handy when manoeuvring in tight spots or negotiating tough terrain when off-road. Headroom is generous front and back, even with the sunroof fitted, and legroom in the middle row is sufficient for even the tallest of passengers. Those wanting to use the rearmost chairs will need to be nimble, as in common with most seven-seat SUVs, you’ll need to do a fair bit of climbing. For carrying capacity, the Shogun is best in five-seat mode, where there’s a large, wide and deep area, with a relatively low loading sill. The side opening rear door is a pain in confined spaces, however. Oddment space is generally good, with a deep storage area under the armrest and a generously sized glovebox. Start the Shogun from cold and first impressions aren’t good. It takes an age for the engine to fire into life, and when it does there’s plenty of clatter. Moving away from rest there’s decent pace, albeit in a noisy fashion, and the sound never really disappears, even at motorway speeds. Most newer rivals employ smoother six-cylinder units to combat noise and deliver a smoother demeanour. But even if the engine was quieter, you’re still left with plenty of road and wind noise. Heavy, slow to react steering is a chore in car parks, but is alright at higher speeds. The tall sides of the Shogun inevitably mean some body lean when cornering, however, with excellent grip there’s rarely any drama. The suspension has clearly been setup for comfort rather than outright agility, soaking up all but the deepest of potholes and ruts nicely. So the Shogun is lagging behind the class best for on-road ability, but thanks to its selectable four-wheel-drive system, there isn’t another vehicle at this price point, with the same long list of equipment, that can touch it off-road in the rough stuff, and also in its.
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