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Essex Coupe

All Essex Photos

Essex Coupe - information: Essex Coupe is a very good car, that was released by "Essex" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Essex Coupe on this page.

Brand Name Essex
Model Essex Coupe
Number of views 63363 views
Model's Rate 9.6 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • 959 Panigale.

    The 959 Panigale is the latest superbike to join the Ducati arsenal. Featuring a new 157-PS 955-cc liquid-cooled twincylinder engine, the 959 Panigale fills the gap between the 899 Panigale and the Panigale R in terms of engine displacement. The bike shares the same innovative and state-of-the-art technologies as the 1299 Panigale but is designed for a more enjoyable everyday experience along with the thrills of a good thrashing session around a racetrack.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
  • SCRAMBLER CLASSIC.

    Ducati’s new Scrambler range is a trip down memory lane. A modern tribute to the care-free, halcyon days of the original Scrambler, which was born in 1962. Born free, in fact, as is engraved on the fuel cap. Sweet touches like that bring a smile to my face and encourage me to mentally unshackle from the putrid and mayhem filled realities of the so-called modern world. The Scrambler Classic is the machine to do it on. So easy to ride. Easy on the eye. Comfortable. Inspiring in a fashion that is not bent towards velocity. You don’t have to try and be fast on one. Just take it easy, dude, enjoy the ride and pass it on. The new Scrambler has an extra cylinder and a fair bit more capacity over its distant predecessor, using the reliable and effervescent 803cc air-cooled Desmo two-valve engine. The motor yields an excellent mix of easily accessible power and consistent torque that is further bolstered by well matched gearbox ratios. The bike is ultra-narrow and low in the seat, and all controls are easy to use and light to the touch, making it an attractive prospect to whatever your gender. With a slight weight of 170kg to lug, the Scrambler is certainly a zesty little number, but not intimidating. That’s what its all about, man. The diamond stitched and suitably well-used couch brown seat, spoked wheels, brushed aluminium tank covers and cow-horn ‘bars scream vintage and do a good job of hiding the machine’s actual modernity. If you look more closely there are other nice touches, like the aluminium guards, machined engine covers and tidy exhaust plumbing. It is touted as a fashion and lifestyle statement, again like its daddy, and is effective in this regard. Ducati know this, of course, and have an entire wardrobe available pour femme et homme. Handling is pretty darn good. The 18in front and relatively high profile tyres tend to slow direction changes, but this is well compensated by the handlebars, light weight and general rider ergonomics. It’s a willing performer in the curves too, with good clearance and confident corner tracking. The relatively soft suspension is not complex and provides decent stroke for absorbing corrugations. The overall comfort helps alleviate some of the effects of “hanging out in the wind” a bit, too. Brakes, which feature the miracle of ABS and “radial” caliper mounting, are effective but feel wooden, like old Brembos do. The dash is suitably sparse, but a disappointment - there is nothing analogue in it and it is not easily read, which is a shame. But in keeping with the peace, love and good happiness stuff theme, I can forgive and even forget. Overall, the Scrambler is a great little machine that is rewarding as much as it is pleasing to ride. Just hop on and go - it’s that easy. It is destined to be a hit with many people seeking a bike that is functional and places the rider in a more restful universe.
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