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Faun F 60 Zugmaschine

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Faun F 60 Zugmaschine - information: Faun F 60 Zugmaschine is a very good car, that was released by "Faun" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Faun F 60 Zugmaschine on this page.

Brand Name Faun
Model Faun F 60 Zugmaschine
Number of views 24335 views
Model's Rate 6.9 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
  • V7 II.

    Moto Guzzi launched the new generation of the V7 at EICMA 2015, called V7 II, six years after the re-launch of the iconic motorcycle. Although a classic in its visual appeal, the V7 II is a modern motorcycle loaded with modern technologies. The bike is powered by Moto Guzzi’s new 744-cc air-cooled engine that puts out 48 PS at 6,200 RPM and 60 Nm of maximum torque at a rather low 2,800 RPM. Transmission is via a new six-speed gearbox as opposed to the previous V7’s five-speed unit. The clutch, too, has been improved with better linkages and modifications to the lever and cable in order to achieve a softer action and an even release. The bike should be headed to India soon and, once launched here, should make for an interesting choice in that segment.
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