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Fiatagri 980

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Fiatagri 980 - information: Fiatagri 980 is a very good car, that was released by "Fiatagri" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Fiatagri 980 on this page.

Brand Name Fiatagri
Model Fiatagri 980
Number of views 112167 views
Model's Rate 8.7 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • SIX HITTERS.

    These two Benelli sixes were part of a sensational stand by a coalition of three clubs for six-cylinder bikes from Honda, Kawasaki and Benelli. The yellow caf? racer was built by Jean Louis Gayot with help from friend Enrique Martinez. Jean Louis runs a small bike shop called Paris Moto Classique and said: “My desire was to have a caf? racer with silencers that were politically correct, but with a nice sound. I want to ride it on the road and see the reaction of people. I thought I was going to be stopped by a policeman on the roadside one time, but he waved at me and gave me the thumbs up. Another time I rode to Castellet [Paul Ricard circuit] and Agostini told me my bike was ‘ very efficient but also very musical’.” Gayot’s Sei has high-lift cams, six Dell’Orto carbs instead of the stock three, Fontana front brake and box-section swingarm. The special exhaust and tank/ seat bodywork were all sourced from Italy. The green road racer, called Garuda (a large predatory bird in Buddhist mythology) is owned by Bernard Moudurier, president of the Benelli Six Owners Club in France and founder of the Benelli Racing Team. Jean Louis said: “Bernard wanted to prove that the Sei could be a competitive road racing machine, unlike Benelli’s illfated Bol d’Or bike in 1976. He’s a guy who likes to prove nothing is impossible!” The bike finished 14th overall at Magny Cours in a classic endurance race, running second in the wet.
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
  • Nissan NP300 Navara.

    Pickups are at the brawny end of the car scene, utility vehicles that used to have a rough and ready image, and the structure and driving characteristics to match. In recent times they have become a lot more civilised, with big advances in creature comfort and road-going behaviour. The latest of the breed, Nissan’s new NP300 Navara - the NP stands for Nissan Pickup - is a very good example of how far down that road pickups have progressed. It is a big vehicle at five and a half metres long, and its elevated chassis means that you still need to be a tall, strong bloke to enter the cab with ease: it’s rather a physical upward haul for those of us more vertically challenged. But once installed it’s something of a revelation. All the controls are pleasantly weighted and you don’t need beefy muscles to drive this latest generation of Navara. It has undergone a mechanical transformation, with the rather rustic leafspring suspension of the previous model now replaced by more sophisticated coil springs, while the previous 2.5-litre dCi engine has been superseded by a more efficient 2.3-litre dCi unit with either 161 or 188bhp power outputs. Both changes bring big benefits. The new Navara has taut and tidy handling, but without undue body lean, and it also rides impressively well with some of the most cushioned comfort of any of the current crop of modern pickups. Strong performance doesn’t come with a noise penalty, and refinement is very good indeed for a vehicle of this type. Gearbox choice is six-speed manual or a seven-speed automatic transmission, and both have well-spaced ratios and a slick action. There are two body styles, the King Cab that is popular in some other markets, with shorter, rear-opening back doors and a basic bench back seat, and the Double Cab that is generally preferred here in the UK and has four full-size conventional doors and fully comfortable back seats. There is nothing rustic about interior comfort, it is on a par with a well-appointed five-seater family hatchback. It’s amply spacious and not cramped. Cabin quality has taken a quantum leap forward over the old model, with tactile materials, an elegantly styled dashboard layout and a level of fit and finish that would not disgrace a prestige-nudging saloon. Large door pockets, some well-placed central cubbyholes and a handy dashboard-top tray means there are enough places to put all your on-the-move oddments. There are five grades of trim, starting with Visia and rising through Acenta, Acenta+, N-Connecta and topping out with Tekna. All versions come with a fair level of standard kit, including Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity, electric windows, cruise control, automatic headlights, electric door mirrors, LED rear lights, and air conditioning on all four-wheel-drive models. Move up the range to Acenta trim and 16-inch alloy wheels are fitted, as well as keyless entry and start and chrome embellishments. Acenta+ versions feature 18-inch alloy wheels, climate control, rear privacy glass, reversing camera, front fog lights, leather steering wheel and gearknob, as well as heated door mirrors with power folding. In N-Connecta trim, as tested, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system is included, and there’s DAB digital radio and Bluetooth audio streaming, while choosing Tekna versions includes leather upholstery, roof rails, LED headlights and daytime running lights, rear parking sensors, a 360 degree camera system and heated and electric driver’s seat. A rear differential lock is optional on all models except the entrylevel Visia trim, while an electric sunroof is available on Tekna versions at extra cost. The new NP300 Navara shows how far pickups have come in recent years. From the outside this is still a large, beefy workhorse, albeit one with sleeker curves than before. From the inside, and in its driving manners, you could think yourself at the wheel of an upper-crust SUV. Nissan has done a good job of significantly upping its game with this one.
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  • 2015 McLaren 650S Coupe / Spider
    Simultaneously, the huge carbon-ceramic brakes, which a rear spoiler supplemented, which with a wonderfully visceral and natural pedal feel. Because of its intensity, the 650S is extremely easy on the road while the ride and feel is admirable in natural and also on Sport mode, but Track mode is a bit brittle. Moreover, McLaren maintains that the spider with its two-piece hardtop that is power-retractable and 100-or-so pounds of added weight that is fast around the roads and track as the coupe. McLaren's proficiency in carbon fiber pays dividends here, and the fact states that McLaren is building the Formula one vehicles for half a decade from the windshield cowl or anywhere when kissing Ascari's apex limiting or encountering hard bumps in the road. ...see full review

  • 2014 BMW 4-Series Convertible
    Still, the controls are a little awkward and weird to operate as you would have to place your finger on a truck lid-mounted sort of button, which moves along with the entire rooftop and with the trunk lid, but the system, is completely effective despite all its complications. ...see full review

  • 2016 Volvo XC90
    Storage behind the third row looks larger unlike prior experience as mostly the 2016 version of XC90 is going to be longer by about four inches as compared to old one, which is also a little wider and slightly lower. There's an adjustable bin below the load floor for the spare tire—an item that is an important than convenience in Volvo. ...see full review

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