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Ford 15M

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Ford 15M - information: Ford 15M is a very good car, that was released by "Ford" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Ford 15M on this page.

Brand Name Ford
Model Ford 15M
Number of views 44306 views
Model's Rate 5.4 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • G 310 R.

    The much-talked-about collaboration between BMW Motorrad and our very own TVS Motors has resulted in this: the BMW G 310 R. Although there was no mention of TVS at the BMW Motorrad stall at EICMA, this is the bike that will lead the Indo-German onslaught in the suddenly burgeoning 300-cc segment. Styling of this brand-new naked motorcycle, BMW’s first sub-500-cc bike in recent years, is attractive but far from revolutionary. Ergonomics seem to be fairly relaxed but not as upright as a typical commuter. So far so conservative. What is truly revolutionary, however, is the engine placement - unlike all other manufacturers BMW have gone with a design that places the exhaust outlet facing backwards. Although the advantages of this move are unclear, it would aid ram air intake if there was one. Speaking of the engine, it’s an all-new 313-cc water-cooled single-cylinder with four valves and DOHC. Peak power is rated at 34 PS, which is available at 9,500 revs, while max torque of 28 Nm comes in at 7,500 RPM. Can’t wait to ride it!
  • Improved Kyalami could host WEC.

    Porsche’s Kyalami Racing Circuit played host to the recent launch of the 991.2 Turbo and C4S (which you can read about beginning on page 20) and, after speaking with officials from the circuit, Total 911 can reveal there are plans in place to return the venue to the very top of the motorsporting calendar. Purchased at an auction in July 2014 by Porsche South Africa CEO and entrepreneur, Toby Venter, a total refurbishment of the facility and track commenced in May 2015, and is set to be finished by the end of May 2016, with a variety of new buildings and upgraded facilities already evident. The fully resurfaced track itself is wider in some areas, with a longer straight, and run-off areas have been greatly improved - all in line with FIA regulations. The track has an illustrious history of races and drivers to its name, including 18 Formula One Grands Prix hosted between 1967 and 1985, while legends such as Jacky Ickx, Alain Prost, Jim Clark, Nigel Mansell and Jackie Stewart have also raced there. Kyalami’s general manager refused to be drawn on speculation linking the circuit with an appearance on the WEC calendar when questioned by Total 911, but did confirm that several manufacturers have already booked the track for days on end towards the latter part of 2016. This is partly the reason why the track won’t be branded as ‘Porsche’, as it will be open for any manufacturer or brand to hire the facility. Once finished, there will also be a skid pan, a 1.1-kilometre handling circuit and an off-road training course. Needless to say, there is a lot more planned for this new world-class facility. Mr Venter is an avid Porsche racer, so we won’t be surprised if he plans to bring WEC and Formula One to South Africa, while journalists driving the circuit at the Turbo launch were impressed by the layout and on-track challenges. It is also quite possible that Porsche AG will conduct hot weather track testing there in the future. Although the company won’t be able to keep its cars away from prying eyes, perfect weather conditions will be present at the venue, which is also one of the highest altitude tracks in the world. Porsche AG has been conducting hot weather tests in South Africa for a number of years now, and having a track in the vicinity to add to its test schedule will be of considerable benefit.
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
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