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Ford 15M

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Ford 15M - information: Ford 15M is a very good car, that was released by "Ford" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Ford 15M on this page.

Brand Name Ford
Model Ford 15M
Number of views 44306 views
Model's Rate 5.4 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV 2.0 MIVEC GX4h.

    Bandwagons have rarely looked as tasty as this. Mitsubishi’s first PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) looked like a confused fish, but now it has design bite and a sparkle in its LED eyes. If it means business, it brings a market report that makes irresistible reading: in the last 12 months, around 39,000 hybrid cars have sold in the UK, a rise of around 7,000 on the previous year. And this is the star of that sales storm, Britain’s number one plug-in hybrid. Not that I initially felt turned on. My car was delivered by an expert called Dave. I gave him a lift to the railway station, but by the time we’d got to the drop-off bay, I began to wish he’d stay. After all, the boot’s quite roomy, even with all those batteries aboard. It wasn’t that Dave was great company (though if you’re reading this, Dave, it was nice to meet you), but just more that the initial prospect of a gear-free gizmo with steering paddles that effectively operate braking, with buttons that allow you to bank energy options, and with more than a Maplin’s worth of electrical socketry… well, let’s just say that as I drove off, I wondered if the handbrake might also cunningly adjust the fridge back at home. I certainly knew how Laika must have felt when those Russians packed her off in Sputnik 2: forget range anxiety, I needed to conquer technology terror first. But unlike a doomed dog I soon began to relax. Within two days, I was a first-class ecoheaded guru, mentally kerchinging full-on B5 regeneration mode on a 1:10 slope, tutting knowingly at the elastic nature of what is forecast to be a mile of battery juice (in the Outer Cotswolds, it can be mere furlongs) and laughing sarcastically at the difference between a functioning charge point and the sort supermarkets brag about (thanks, Sainsbury’s) which, when driven to, “don’t work and never have, mate, not since it was installed on day one’. Mitsubishi won’t tell you, but this car also comes with an anorak as standard. You think you'll not need it, but you’ll soon be zipped in snugly. The reason? E-driving is addictive. Think about it: rationally, it’s the last avenue of motoring pleasure open to any sane driver out there. Drive wisely, zap regularly (from home at about 50p a pop) and a brave new world of fiscal freedom beckons. Before you know it, you’re a moth to that elusive candle of perpetual motion. Be warned though: egg-shell throttling and B5-level regeneration spells inordinate use of the brake lights, which now kick in because, as Dave told me, regeneration has the same net effect as steady braking. Could this spell expensive dentistry for BMW drivers, I ask Dave. We agreed that, all told, we must make sure that the planet comes first. Shunt stress aside, the PHEV soon proves to be as much fun with batteries as anything roadgoing. For me, at least. Five hundred miles in, I show my wife we’re achieving the kind of mpg fossil fuellists can only dream about. Yes, she says, but driving at 29mph might not always be practical. And those other drivers… maybe that’s not friendly waving? She takes the car to work though, and while I haven’t monitored her journey GCHQstyle (it may well be a Bluetooth option), I snoop on her data and see she’s been wearing that anorak as well. Not that the PHEV’s incapable of driving like you forgot to turn the chip pan off. In a few hundred yards of thoughtless abandon, I floored it to see how it liked a bit of action. It was, as they say, up for it, though that two tonnes of bodyweight did make me think of a Labrador suffering from greyhound delusions. Still, I’m not sure Mitsubishi’s seeking product placement in the next Bond movie, so maybe it's a moot point. A snap verdict? I love it. It’s early days, but my PHEV’s got my expectations on maximum charge.
  • FORD news.

    Enhancements to the C-MAX and Grand C-MAX with 1.5-litre TDCi engine and PowerShift gearbox has seen CO2 emissions tumble from 115 to 109g/km in the five-seat edition and 124 to 119g/km in the seven-seat Grand C-MAX model. It means that each version drops one vehicle excise duty band and in the case of the C-MAX, there’s a decease of two company car tax benefit-in kind brackets to 19 per cent. The Grand C-MAX drops one band to 21 per cent. Despite the enhanced efficiency, prices remain the same as before with the C-MAX Zetec 1.5 TDCi PowerShift costing Ј21,295 and rising to Ј26,395 for the Grand C-MAX Titaniumm X 1.5 TDCi PowerShift.
  • Jaguar XJ.

    It’s fair to say that the new Jaguar XE and XF have been soaking up most of the coverage about Jaguar of late, not to mention the upcoming F-Pace, set to arrive in showrooms next year. And then there’s been the Bond connection, with 007 behind the wheel of the stunning C-X75 supercar, which though once mooted for production, won’t now be built. With so much going on, it’s little surprise that the announcement of a revised XJ fell below the radar, with the first examples arriving in showrooms just about now. It’s remarkable to think that the F-Type is now Jaguar’s oldest car in its line-up, having only been launched in 2012, and arriving in showrooms during 2013. It’s a far cry from Jaguar’s line-up just a few years ago when most of the models seemed quite elderly. It’s been the hefty cash injection from Jaguar’s owners, Tata Motors, that has made the difference, ever since it bought the firm alongside Land Rover back in 2008. In excess of Ј11 billion has been invested over the past seven years, which has resulted in the transformation that we see today. And while Jaguar’s sales performance hasn’t quite lived up to the spectacular results that the Land Rover range has seen, last month’s increase in sales of 93 per cent compared to a year ago is predicted to be just the start. Much of Jaguar’s hopes are being pinned on the upcoming F-Pace crossover vehicle, though this updated XJ is set to make a small, but significant contribution thanks to important gains in the chauffeur market. Jaguar executives have been wooing big names in the professional end of the market, and it’ll mean that you’ll see more long- wheelbase XJs on the outside of the motorway instead of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The headline change in the latest XJ, apart from some modest styling changes, is the introduction of a new Euro-6 compliant 3.0- litre V6 diesel engine that develops 296bhp and a mighty 516lb ft of torque. That’s a rather useful 25bhp up on the outgoing model, not to mention the 73lb ft of torque. And yet, both CO2 emissions and fuel economy figures are improved over the previous edition, with this standard wheelbase R-Sport edition emitting 155g/km of CO2 and capable of 47.9mpg on the combined cycle. Less sporty editions manage 149g/km and 49.6mpg, an enhancement compared to the 159g/km and 46.3mpg possible on the earlier model. And this time around there’s no penalty for choosing the long-wheelbase edition, with fuel economy and CO2 emissions remaining the same. But with the vital statistics out of the way, it’s time to talk about some of the changes made to the car. New full-LED lights give the latest XJ a more distinctive quad-lighting signature at night, while a prominent, upright front grille gives a much more muscular, imposing stance. At the rear, LED technology is used to great effect to deliver a J-shape signature for the tail lights, flanked by revised bumpers, a gloss black valence and a chrome insert. A totally new, superfast infotainment system totally transforms the connectivity of the latest XJ, finally putting to rest the limitations and clunkiness of the old audio and navigation system. And finally, the model range has been revised to add a dynamic R-Sport edition, as tested here, as well as a flagship Autobiography model paired to the long-wheelbase body that elevates the XJ range past the Ј80k barrier. The cabin of the latest XJ is as special as ever. The materials are sumptuous, swathed in leather, and the wrap-around effect of the dashboard delivers a cosy, encapsulating feel. Piano black surfaces deliver a modern, sporty look, while the heavily bolstered chairs hold you in place nicely along demanding stretches of road. The air vents wouldn’t be out of place in a Rolls-Royce, giving the impression that nothing has been spared in the search for ultimate luxury. Generous adjustment to the front chairs means that you can get a really comfortable driving position, though the front seats don’t go low enough to stop the heads of taller drivers from brushing the headlining when the optional sunroof is fitted. Move to the back, and there’s a generous amount of knee and leg space and rear passengers don’t seem to suffer from headroom limitations like those in the front do. The sizeable transmission tunnel running through the centre of the car means that the XJ is best suited to two passengers sat in the back. In common with the XF, there’s theatrics in store when the car is started up, with the rotary gear selector rising up from the centre console. It’s a feature that you never tire of and adds to the special feel that every XJ delivers. Accelerate off the line and the latest 296bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine catapults you along the road faster than its predecessor. It may only be 0.2 of a second faster to 62mph, but responsiveness is improved nonetheless, no doubt helped by the extra torque on tap. It’s impressively refined at all speeds, yet delivers a pleasing growl when you bury the accelerator pedal into the bulkhead. Despite being more than five metres long, agility through tricky corners is impressive, with excellent grip and reassuringly flat handling. The steering has a pleasing weight to it, and is highly satisfying when being piloted through a challenging set of bends. It’s really good fun for such a big car, yet is utterly manoeuvrable in a city setting. The suspension of this R-Sport model errs on the firm side, no doubt, and will appeal to owners that prefer a more dynamic driving experience. A short drive of the Autobiography model rounded off the sharper edges nicely, delivering a smoother ride at all road speeds.
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