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Fordson 7V

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Fordson 7V - information: Fordson 7V is a very good car, that was released by "Fordson" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Fordson 7V on this page.

Brand Name Fordson
Model Fordson 7V
Number of views 86936 views
Model's Rate 6.1 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • MAKE MINE A “SUPERMID”.

    Just as it did in 2015 with the 1299 Panigale, Ducati has upped the ante in 2016 with the smaller Panigale, giving the previous 899 the same stroke measurement as the 1299 to create the new 959 Panigale. Ducati wanted to ensure that the “supermid” Panigale kept pace with its bigger brother, so it invited the world’s motorcycling media to the Circuit de la Comunitat Valenciana Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, to let us find out. Looking at the updates, they are minimal but important, with the engine’s slight increase in stroke from 57.2mm to 60.8mm (resulting in a total displacement of 955cc) necessitating a new crankshaft and connecting rods. The piston crowns are slightly different, while strict Euro 4 noise emissions standards required the fitment of a different exhaust system with dual muffl ers on the right side (thankfully absent from US models), along with ribbing on the cylinder heads and valve covers, and a different cam chain. Exhaust diameter was increased from 55mm to 60mm, while on the intake side, the 62mm oval throttle bodies now feature dual injectors. The clutch now has the slipper/assist function from the 1299 that provides lighter lever action and smoother downshifting when riding aggressively. Meanwhile, thanks to the bike employing the same cast-aluminum monocoque two-piece frame that uses the engine as a structural member, changes on the chassis side are limited to dropping the swingarm pivot 4mm for better rear-tire grip. I had spent a couple of days on an 899 Panigale last year at Circuit of The Americas in Texas, so I had a good idea of what to compare the 959 to. It didn’t take me long to realize that the 959 has power all over the 899 regardless-and not only more of it through the rpm range but smoother power, too, with fewer dips and bumps in the powerband. Ducati claims 157 hp, an increase of 9 hp from the 899’s 148 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a torque peak of 79 foot-pounds (a massive 6 foot-pound increase over the 899) at 9,000 rpm. The same Ducati electronics suite of RbW (Ride-by-Wire), DTC (Ducati Traction Control), EBC (Engine Brake Control), DQS (Ducati Quickshift), and Bosch ABS does an excellent job of keeping everything under control. With the DTC set to Level 2 in the Race riding mode, the new 959 Panigale comes off the corners well and continues pulling hard as the rpm rises. I did find, however, that you need to exercise some care in Race mode when opening the throttle midcorner, as the 959’s increased and more responsive torque can come on a little abruptly. If anything, it’s more of an annoyance, really, and it’s very manageable; you just have to be aware of it. The Sport mode throttle response is softer (with the rain-intended Wet mode softer still) and perhaps a little too soft for the track, which is why I left it in Race mode for the majority of my laps. Setting the EBC at Level 1 (the least enginebraking) with the slipper clutch was a big help under braking, allowing the rear end to step out just enough while hammering downshifts to aid but not interfere with corner entry. And speaking of braking, the feel and control provided by the Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers and 320mm discs were outstanding, allowing trail braking deep into the corner without issues. The fully adjustable Showa 43mm Big Piston Fork offered a very solid feel in all conditions, and while the fully adjustable Sachs rear shock performed admirably, I was wishing for a slightly stiffer spring in the back to counter some squatting under acceleration. Midcorner stability was rock-solid, and although initial turn-in at speed took some effort (a likely by-product of the rear-end squat), overall steering habits were light and agile- the 959’s 430-pound wet weight surely helping matters here. The taller and wider windscreen definitely helps keep the windblast off you down long front straights better than its comparatively skimpy predecessor. And you can move around easily on the bike, aided by the same knurled footpegs found on the 1299 that grip your boots far better than the previously useless pegs found on generations of Ducatis that were only good to rest your feet on when cruising in a straight line. All told, boosting the displacement and adding subtle tweaks to its “Supermid” superquadro engine has yielded great results with the new 959 Panigale. This is the type of bike you can really feel like you’re squeezing all the potential out of, instead of the 1299 Panigale where at times you feel like you’re only along for the ride. Yeah, calling a bike with a 955cc engine a midsize machine is a bit of a stretch, but after a ride on the 959 Panigale, you probably won’t care one bit.
  • DS 4.

    Little more than a year after Citroen announced that it would be spinning off its DS cars into a separate luxury subbrand, the French firm has facelifted half of its line-up, with both the DS 4 and flagship DS 5 sporting the company’s new corporate nose treatment. The rest of the range, namely the DS 3 supermini and Cabrio, will get an update within weeks, adopting a similarly bold front end that will also see the end of the double chevrons adorning the car, as has been done with the DS 4 and DS 5. While the UK is the biggest single market for the DS 3, there’s still some work to be done on the rest of the range, but the newly formed firm is hoping that revisions to the DS 4, including a realignment of its market positioning will transform sales. DS Automobiles is looking to attract two different sets of buyers for the newly revised DS 4, with the regular DS 4 riding lower compared to before, while the new Crossback model is aimed at the crossover market thanks to its raised ride height of 30 millimetres, and more rugged, off-road inspired styling cues. At the car’s international launch a couple of months ago, we focused upon the DS 4 Crossback edition, but now with the first examples arriving in UK showrooms, we were able to spend time behind the wheel of the DS 4 Prestige, paired to the flagship 178bhp BlueHDi engine. One of the biggest criticisms of the outgoing DS 4 was its unyielding ride and we’re pleased to say that ride comfort has been transformed on the new car. Deep ruts and potholes are tackled with ease, and there’s no need to brace yourself like you needed to do with the old car. Steering feel is particularly agile with lots of feel, with the DS 4 asserting itself as being different from the humdrum hatchback segment. Through the bends there’s minimal body lean and a decent amount of grip, inspiring confidence in more challenging corners. While it doesn’t offer the same kind of driver satisfaction as Ford’s Focus, there’s reasonable agility and the experience is reassuringly safe and predictable. The engine is quiet and refined, only becoming heard when you really gun the right hand pedal, and while there’s a fair amount of road noise on noisier surfaces, wind noise isn’t intrusive. Away from the lights there’s decent pace, with smooth gearshifts from the six-speed automatic transmission. The brakes deliver good bite, though beware if you have anything larger than average sized feet, as the space in the foot well is at a premium. There’s very little room between the centre console and the clutch pedal on manual gearbox variants, and it’s all too easy to get your size tens stuck uncomfortably, and then there’s a mad scramble to get the clutch down in time for you to stop. It’s a good reason why you’re better off opting for the automatic variants in preference to the manual versions. Apart from revisions to the dashboard to incorporate a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, and the first time that Apple CarPlay has been seen in a PSA Peugeot-Citroen-DS product, it’s business as usual. So that means a nicely appointed cabin with surfaces that are a cut above the norm in the medium car segment. The trademark DS watchstrap-inspired leather upholstery is on offer and looks sensational. There’s squidgy materials used for the dashboard, but disappointingly the door tops are hard plastic unless you opt for the uprated leather trim. The instruments where you can change the backlighting are a nice touch, and all of the controls are neatly positioned up high for ease of use. You’ll need to be a contortionist to use the USB socket, or have small hands, though, because it’s awkwardly positioned on the centre console. And that’s particularly disappointing as the use of Apple’s CarPlay depends on you being able to plug in your iPhone via the USB socket. The newly introduced touchscreen is easy to use and nicely positioned just within your field of vision. While it isn’t the most responsive system around, it’s certainly no better or worse than some rival systems. Our test car came equipped with the distinctive watchstrap upholstery and comfort and lateral support is simply excellent. It’s also easy to adjust the seats to gain a good position, though the steering wheel always feels like it is positioned too close. Space up front is pretty good, apart from the aforementioned pedal problems, while at the rear there’s surprisingly more space than you expect. Once installed in the back, knee and headroom is actually alright, though it can be a bit of challenge to get in and out. Those shapely styled rear doors come to a point, and if you’re not careful you could do someone a mischief. Space around the cabin for oddments is generally good, with a decent-sized tray in front of the gear lever and well-proportioned door pockets. While vision out of the front of the car is good, thick rear pillars and a shallow rear window make manoeuvring more of a challenge. It’s therefore pleasing that all DS 4s come with rear parking sensors for added reassurance. Boot space is well proportioned at 385 litres, though you’ll have to get over the high sill first. The optional Denon audio system restricts space a little, but the seats are easy to fold down with the pull of a lever. With the launch of the new DS 4, prices have increased a notch due to realignment of the model range. Where the previous DSign model offered an attractive entry price to DS 4 ownership, it wasn’t particularly well equipped, something you can’t level at all models of this latest DS 4 range. For instance, all versions come with DAB digital radio, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, dual-zone climate control, rear privacy glass, cruise control and automatic headlights and wipers.
  • SKODA news.

    All versions of the Skoda Rapid 1.6-litre TDI hatchback now emit CO2 emissions of 99g/km and are capable of 74.3mpg in optimum conditions on the combined fuel economy cycle. Previously these models emitted 109g/km and 67.3mpg, respectively. All S, SE and SE L editions are affected, with prices remaining the same at Ј17,160 for the Rapid S and rising to Ј18,885 for the SEL.
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  • 2016 Volvo XC90
    The Volvo informs that the XC90 is "true seven-seater while designed with a focus on convenience of use." The back row is spacious along with plenty of legroom even for boot below the front seats. Like before, the middle seats adjust fore-and-after to distinguish legroom distribution between the second and third rows. The way to rear seat is the tightest place to be, but we managed to sit there without too much of discomfort. Still in the last row, there are plenty of room feet under the middle seats, although in and out is a bit cramped. ...see full review

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