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General Dynamics M1A1 'Abrams'

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General Dynamics M1A1 'Abrams' - information: General Dynamics M1A1 'Abrams' is a very good car, that was released by "General Dynamics" company. We collected the best 11 photos of General Dynamics M1A1 'Abrams' on this page.

Brand Name General Dynamics
Model General Dynamics M1A1 'Abrams'
Number of views 80301 views
Model's Rate 5.6 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
  • This is Yamaha S10000R.

    YAMAHA ALWAYS SAID there would be larger MTmodels, and that the crossplane-crank inline-four engine fromthe YZF-R1 could be used. Given theMT-07’s twin andMT-09’s triple are ‘crossplane concept’ and called the CP2 andCP3, it would kindamake sense to have an actual crossplanemotor in the range. So here’s the newMT-10. This isn’t just the engine froman R1. Unlike its purposebuilt siblings, and despite promising to be ‘enjoyed on any road, any time and at any speed’, theMT-10 is heavily based on themachine that donates its gravelly, snarling engine. Frame, forks, shock and brakes are nicked fromthe sportsbike (or, to be precise, the slightly lower-spec R1-S that they get in the USA). This is Yamaha’s S1000R. Obviously there are changes. The 998cc engine has different pistons, crank, intake, exhaust and injection for bottom-end balls and midrange might, and revised gearing. Like other MTs there are three ridingmodes, but the MT-10 also has cruise control and threelevel traction. A quickshifter will be optional. The frame has ‘optimised strength/rigidity balance’, with a steel subframe andmodified settings for the suspension, and a stubby 1400mmwheelbase - just 20mm longer than the trim newMT-03. Radial calipers have ABS, and the Bridgestone tyres are specially developed for the bike. You’ll get 17 litres in the tank and there’s a 12v power socket. Colours? Blue, black, or the ‘Night Fluro’ grey with high-vis wheels that’s available across theMT range. Yamaha have trodden this path before. The now-defunct FZ1was based on an R1, but its attitude and revvy delivery made it hard work against rival nakeds of the day. Times change however, and now we’re in the age of the supernaked theMT could be just the job. Yamaha haven’t decided howmuch power or weight to claim, or howmuch it’ll cost. But they do assure us that the new MT-10 will be here in May.
  • Improved Kyalami could host WEC.

    Porsche’s Kyalami Racing Circuit played host to the recent launch of the 991.2 Turbo and C4S (which you can read about beginning on page 20) and, after speaking with officials from the circuit, Total 911 can reveal there are plans in place to return the venue to the very top of the motorsporting calendar. Purchased at an auction in July 2014 by Porsche South Africa CEO and entrepreneur, Toby Venter, a total refurbishment of the facility and track commenced in May 2015, and is set to be finished by the end of May 2016, with a variety of new buildings and upgraded facilities already evident. The fully resurfaced track itself is wider in some areas, with a longer straight, and run-off areas have been greatly improved - all in line with FIA regulations. The track has an illustrious history of races and drivers to its name, including 18 Formula One Grands Prix hosted between 1967 and 1985, while legends such as Jacky Ickx, Alain Prost, Jim Clark, Nigel Mansell and Jackie Stewart have also raced there. Kyalami’s general manager refused to be drawn on speculation linking the circuit with an appearance on the WEC calendar when questioned by Total 911, but did confirm that several manufacturers have already booked the track for days on end towards the latter part of 2016. This is partly the reason why the track won’t be branded as ‘Porsche’, as it will be open for any manufacturer or brand to hire the facility. Once finished, there will also be a skid pan, a 1.1-kilometre handling circuit and an off-road training course. Needless to say, there is a lot more planned for this new world-class facility. Mr Venter is an avid Porsche racer, so we won’t be surprised if he plans to bring WEC and Formula One to South Africa, while journalists driving the circuit at the Turbo launch were impressed by the layout and on-track challenges. It is also quite possible that Porsche AG will conduct hot weather track testing there in the future. Although the company won’t be able to keep its cars away from prying eyes, perfect weather conditions will be present at the venue, which is also one of the highest altitude tracks in the world. Porsche AG has been conducting hot weather tests in South Africa for a number of years now, and having a track in the vicinity to add to its test schedule will be of considerable benefit.
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