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General Motors of Canada Light Armoured Vehicle III LAV III

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General Motors of Canada Light Armoured Vehicle III LAV III - information: General Motors of Canada Light Armoured Vehicle III LAV III is a very good car, that was released by "General Motors of Canada" company. We collected the best 8 photos of General Motors of Canada Light Armoured Vehicle III LAV III on this page.

Brand Name General Motors of Canada
Model General Motors of Canada Light Armoured Vehicle III LAV III
Number of views 93823 views
Model's Rate 9.8 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • Hyundai preps prestige onslaught.

    HYUNDAI’S ambitions for its Genesis luxury spin-off brand stepped up two gears with the revelation it will launch six new models in the next four years, including two crossovers and a premium sports coupe. Genesis will also benefit from Hyundai’s ‘N’ department, similar to BMW’s M Division, which will be tasked with turning out highlyfocused sporting versions of many Hyundai and Genesis models, including a twin-turbocharged Coupe to rival the BMW M4. Hyundai is empire-building, and sparing no expense as it goes after the posh end of town. The Korean company that made its name in the 1990s producing cut-price cars is now focusing on the lucrative prestige market. Not only has Hyundai grabbed Luc Donckerwolke, a Belgian designer with experience at Audi, Lamborghini and Bentley, it has also poached the previous boss of BMW M, Albert Biermann, to lead its engineering team. If that wasn’t enough, in late 2015 it lured Lamborghini’s director of brand and design, Manfred Fitzgerald, to head up its Genesis luxury brand globally. The Genesis brand will stand above Hyundai in a similar way that Lexus does to Toyota. It will have six dedicated new models - not shared with Hyundai models - by 2020 to not only help differentiate it from its parent but carve a slice of the premium market from BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz. The first car to fly the flag for Genesis globally will be the Equus replacement revealed at the 2016 Detroit show as the Genesis G90, a large rear-drive luxury sedan to rival 7 Series and S-Class. The G90 will be powered by a choice of the company’s new 272kW 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6, the existing 3.8-litre V6 offered in the Australian Genesis sedan, and a 5.0-litre V8. It has huge potential in North America and China, but there are no plans for right-hand drive, so it won’t come to Australia. Mid-2016, the Hyundai Genesis sedan that introduced the brand name to Australia will be rechristened Genesis G80 and be treated to a light spec and mechanical update. It’s unlikely to get the 3.3-litre turbo until a later, more comprehensive upgrade, though the existing 3.8-litre V6 may come in for performance and efficiency improvements. In 2017, Genesis will launch its first all-new model on an all-new platform, a Mercedes C-Class rival badged G70. This mid-size car, likely to be revealed in concept form at the New York show in late March and powered by the 3.3 twin-turbo V6, will initially be offered as a sedan; a coupe will follow in late-2017 or 2018, while a convertible is also a possibility. Hyundai USA president Dave Zuchowski told Wheels the G70 will be the first car to show what Genesis is really capable of. “This BMW 3 Series-fighter is the first real lightning flash that comes down in terms of ‘Wow, these guys are really working’,” he said. Both the sedan and coupe will be prime candidates for the nascent N performance division, led by former BMW M boss Biermann. It’s not known whether it will turn the wick up on the 3.3-litre V6, or add two more cylinders to produce a 4.4-litre twin-turbo V8 to go up against AMG’s 375kW V8TT and BMW’s 317kW twin-turbo six. An alternative to Hyundai’s existing 5.0-litre V8 is needed because it’s on borrowed time. Biermann all but ruled it out for the G70, saying, “For the future … if you go to performance it might be you need to go to turbo”. Zuchowski also confirmed that Genesis will launch two crossovers by 2020. “Think of [them] as [BMW] X3 and X5, one based off of the [new] platform, one based off Genesis platform.” No names were given for these cars, but both are surely candidates for N performance packs to rival the X3M and X5M. “This isn’t just something we’re talking about; this is something we’re throwing considerable resources, people and dollars against,” Zuchowski said. “And some people may never accept that ... they can’t come to terms with it. And that’s fine. In reality, in a blind taste test if you will, these cars are going to be outstanding.” Hyundai Australia is excited by the opportunities presented by the Genesis brand’s coming product portfolio. While the G90 is ruled out, each new model in the line-up will be considered.
  • NORTON FLAT TRACK.

    This modern Norton dirt track custom is the work of Jamie Ireson’s 72Motorcycles, in collaboration with Norton Motorcycles - a tribute to the 1970s RonWood racing machine that won three Ascot track championship titles and was taken to a National dirt track victory by Alex Jorgenson. Based on a newCommando 961, it was recently launched at Motorcycle Live on the official NortonMotorcycles stand as the first of a limited edition run of 12. Ireson said: “The project started whenmy partnerMerryMichau photographed the 2014 Norton brochure. She toldNorton CEO Stuart Garner that I build custombikes and it went from there. Stuart asked us to come up with some ideas and it turned out that we had the same thoughts on building a custombike based on RonWood’s dirt tracker. Ireson is a design engineer by trade and used his experience gained in the automotive industry to model the bike in CAD before committing to metal. “The one thing we needed to do was lower the bike, and working in CAD with models that Norton supplied allowedme to see what effect that had.” That was November 2014 but it took until June 2015 for the project to take off. “Norton sent me a rolling chassis and engine unit with the only stipulation being that the bike had to be ready forMotorcycle Live at the NEC,” says Jamie. The engine and transmission are standard 961, as is the main frame, but Jamie modified the rear end. He says: “The RonWood bike has a really small oil tank, because it’s designed to only do a small number of laps. I cut off the end off the original tank, made up some bends on a CNCmachine and got themwelded up to follow the lines of Ron Wood’s [oil-carrying] frame.” According to Jamie, the standard Norton chassis geometry is slap bang in the middle of what is considered an ideal flat track set-up, but this build had to retain the standard 17in wheels. The swingarm is also standard, but with added bracing. The standard Ohlins forks were too long so Jamie opted for shorter, larger-diameter 58mm Ducati Panigale forks which slot into new yokes made from Jamie’s CAD drawings by Fastec Racing in Suffolk, who also did machining work on footpeg mounts and the velocity stacks. Jamie produced a buck for the tank, from which Parker Fabrication in Bournemouth produced the alloy tank. “The inspiration of the Ron Wood bike was the gorgeous red paintwork and tank graphics. We talked with out painters, Image Design, about giving it a modern twist, but they said it was so good we should leave it. The only change is using the current Norton logo.” The engine is standard, but Jamie’s removed the original airbox, so: “we might pick up anything between five and 10bhp.” The exhaust follows the same lines as the Ron Wood bike. It’s all custom made and hand-rolled by Tom at Foundry Motorcycles. The pipes have been given a super hard-wearing ceramic-coated black by Wes at Hi-Spec Coatings in West Sussex. Lasertech Engineering did all the frame welding. The Norton 961 MM Flat Track is priced at ?30,000. “All 12 will be identical except for the number,” says Jamie. “We’ve got 44. We’re keeping this original bike. Customers can have any number, but we won’t use one number twice.”
  • 2017 SUZUKI GSX-R1000 CONCEPT.

    Racers and sportbike riders have been waiting impatiently for several years now for an updated Suzuki literbike, but the end is in sight: At the EICMA show last November, the company finally unveiled a new GSX-R1000. But while the new bike was labeled as a 2017 model, it was also called a “concept,” indicating there may still be work to be completed before it reaches production. Suzuki says that the goal for the new bike was to create the “most powerful, hardest-accelerating, cleanest-running GSX-R ever built,” and the “lightest, most aerodynamic, and best-handling GSX-R1000 ever.” To that end, the bike benefits from lessons learned from the GSX-RR MotoGP project. Specifically, the GSX-R uses what Suzuki refers to as a “Broad Power System,” intended to maximize top-end power without sacrificing low-end and midrange torque via four new features: variable valve timing, valves operated by finger followers, top-feed fuel injectors, and dual SET valves in the exhaust headers. Suzuki’s Variable Valve Timing System utilizes a ball-and-groove arrangement on the intake camshaft, activated by centrifugal force stacking the balls in different grooves. As rpm increases, the intake cam is retarded, optimizing cam timing over the rpm range. The new valve train also uses a finger follower setup to improve valve control and reduce moving mass in the top end, allowing increased valve lift and higher peak rpm. The top-feed fuel injectors are located in the airbox (they were previously mounted in the throttle bodies) to better atomize the fuel for more top-end power, again without sacrificing low-rpm output. And the final part of the Broad Power System is Suzuki Exhaust Tuning-Alpha, which utilizes a butterfl y valve between the number one and four exhaust headers and another between the number two and three headers. The valves remain closed at lower rpm to enhance torque and open at higher rpm for more power. Another goal for the engine was to “optimize dimensions to enhance cornering performance” as well as make the chassis as compact as possible. The frame is all new and has revised geometry, though again no numbers were given. Suspension consists of a Showa Balance Free Fork and Balance Free Rear Cushion shock very similar to those used on the 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R; the fork has external nitrogen-charged oil reservoirs and external damping circuits, and the shock is Showa’s latest iteration of the BFRC and is significantly lighter. Other chassis updates include high-volume intake ducts, a lower top and sleeker design for the fuel tank, and more aerodynamic bodywork. Even the fairing mounting bolts have been redesigned, with a new fl at-top shape to reduce air resistance, with other mounting hardware recessed to prevent turbulence. No mention was made of the new GSX-R’s brakes aside from the use of electronic ABS, but the calipers are very similar to the previous model’s Brembo four-pot monoblock units. The rotors, however, appear to be a variant of Brembo’s T-drive discs, with half the traditional buttons replaced by T-shaped pins. According to Brembo, the assembly system transfers braking force more effectively, is lighter, and has greater resistance to thermo-mechanical stress. A single-valve ride-by-wire throttle assembly replaces the old model’s dual-valve setup, and the electronics package now features a 10-level traction control system, three power modes, a quickshifter that works on upshifts as well as downshifts, and launch control. The press material contains no mention of an IMU as part of the electronics package; in this regard the GSX-R may be a step behind the YZF-R1 and new ZX-10R, but this is one aspect that could very well change before the bike reaches production. No word was given on price or availability for the new model, but with race teams the world over clamoring for the updated platform, it’s a safe bet the new bike will be a very-early-release 2017 model.
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