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Gilera 50 Touring

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Gilera 50 Touring - information: Gilera 50 Touring is a very good car, that was released by "Gilera" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Gilera 50 Touring on this page.

Brand Name Gilera
Model Gilera 50 Touring
Number of views 74513 views
Model's Rate 8.3 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • RENAULT news.

    Just as Renault is celebrating 25 years of the Clio in the UK, the firm has wheeled out a special edition to commemorate the anniversary. Named the Clio Iconic 25 Nav, it’s based on the flagship of the diesel range, the Dynamique S Nav, and offered with a choice of manual or automatic transmissions, both paired to the 89bhp 1.5-litre dCi engine. Extra equipment includes 17-inch alloy wheels with black inserts, rear privacy glass, GT part-leather upholstery and heated front seats. Other unique features include special black and white cross-hatch decals on the door mirrors and the option to replicate the motif on the roof, while on the inside, the same treatment features on the air vent surrounds and door armrests. Four colours are on offer - Ivory, Diamond Black, Oyster Grey and Mercury, with prices kicking off at Ј18,075 for the Clio Iconic 25 Nav dCi 90, rising to Ј19,375 for the automatic edition. Available to order now, the first examples arrive in showrooms around Christmas time.
  • TOYOTA LAND CRUISER INVINCIBLE 2.8 D-4D AUTOMATIC.

    When you’ve got a vehicle in your lineup as legendary as the Land Cruiser, the key to success is continuous evolution. Small improvements dotted throughout the model’s life will ensure that you have something new for customers that change their car regularly. This approach, Toyota has got down to a fine art, with the latest car benefiting from a brand new 174bhp 2.8-litre D-4D engine and six-speed automatic transmission that meets the latest Euro-6 emissions regulations. Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are both improved - up by 3.3mpg and down by 19g/km, respectively - but power and torque figures are disappointingly less than before. But despite the power cut, the on-road driving experience is enhanced compared to before. Performance is adequate, and while the engine is chattery from cold, it settles down a fair bit when warmed through. You’ll still hear it, especially when you floor the throttle, but at motorway speeds it settles down to a low roar, while road and wind noise are kept reasonably well in check. There’s a vagueness to the steering, however, cornering prowess is pretty good, with low levels of lean through bends, and generous amounts of grip. A choice of ‘comfort’ or ‘sport’ modes for the suspension means that things get too bouncy and wallowy in the former setting, but nicely firmed up in the latter, with all but the deepest of potholes and severest of undulations soaked up well, making the Sport mode the setting of choice for us. Off road, show the Land Cruiser a muddy field or a heavily rutted track and it’ll eat it up and spit it out - its mug plugging prowess far exceeds its ability on the road. The interior of the Land Cruiser has been steadily improved over time, with better and better materials used along the way. The majority of the plastics are of the soft-touch variety and all of the fixtures and fittings feel like they’ve been screwed together nicely and will stand up to a lifetime’s worth of abuse. The wood trim seems outdated to us, while the steering wheel would be better if it was covered entirely in leather, rather than having the slippery feel of the wood. Controls for the four-wheel-drive system dominate the centre console, with all of the buttons logically arranged up high on the dashboard. The navigation screen is ideally placed and easy to use, with clear and colourful graphics. Visibility is generally good all around the car thanks to its square shape and good sized windows, though the rear wiper is next to useless due to the small area that it wipes. Park it in tight spaces and you’ll curse the side opening tailgate, and wish that it had a more conventional up and over arrangement. The space available is also smaller than most rivals, despite the vehicle’s obvious bulk. Oddment space is well catered for thanks to a large cubby hole underneath the armrest, decently sized door pockets and glovebox, and a pair of cupholders. Even with a sunroof fitted, headroom is pretty good both front and rear, and back seat passengers will be impressed by the amount of knee room. The usual caveats apply when it comes to using the sixth and seventh seat in the back, with passengers likely to want the journey to be as short as possible, unless they’re a youngster.
  • DUCATI 1299 PANIGALES.

    I missed the opportunity to test the regular Ducati 1299 Panigale earlier in the year but first impressions of the 1299 Panigale S are very positive. Jumping on, the bike is tall with an easy reach to the ground even for my 180cm height, reach to the bars is aggressive and the pegs are relatively tall. Taking the Panigale S through my usual testing route the first thing that impressed me was just how planted the bike is, even over relatively poor road surfaces the bike just feels like it’s glued to the road, with great feel front and rear. It’s still very firm, but the semiactive mode takes the bite out of the bumps and as a result the real kick experienced in the old 1199 that was so punishing, to your bum, spine and kidneys, is gone. The S is quite agile, with neutral steering that doesn’t exactly require muscling but does require concentration and thought about where you want to go. Changing your line mid-corner is easy and it really does feel like you’re on rails, regardless of your speed. I’d say it’s similar to the 899 Panigale, on which you don’t notice the effort that goes into handling until you jump on something that feels noticeably quicker steering. That’s not a criticism though, just an observation. The Brembo EVO M50 brake calipers on the front are also extremely strong, not in an off-putting fashion but I did find it easier to use the awesome Ducati Quick Shifter with auto-blipper to drop down a gear to wash off some speed. Talking of power the engine is a belter, down low the 1285cc L-twin is lumpy and you can just about roll along at 19km/h in first without clutch but it’s not pleasant, but that does smooth out rapidly as you reach higher into the revs. The fueling and throttle response are both super smooth and responsive, with Sport providing a smoother power delivery and throttle response than Race and power is just explosive. It’s also seriously loud with the two-into-two system with the stock stainless mufflers in the belly and I thought I might pop an eardrum when I rode into our underground garage a bit too vigorously! What did stand out is just how heavy the clutch lever is, it felt like fighting a bear trap when I got caught in really heavy traffic and was having to use it frequently. The DQS on the other hand means that in anything except stop-start traffic you aren’t using the clutch constantly. The Panigale 1299 S certainly has the goods to justify a model suffix, with its full LED lighting, carbon-fibre front guard and auxiliary adjustment buttons adding to the awesome Panigale package. But what really conveys the value of the premium price of $34,990 plus on roads is the full Ohlins suspension, using the Ohlins Smart EC semi-active suspension system for both the NIX30 forks and TTX36 rear shock, as well as an Ohlins steering damper, while further communicating with the Bosch Inertia Platform - which provides cornering ABS and greater traction control refinement. Not only this but the system can actually be run in Fixed mode, which turns off the semiactive suspension and allows full adjustability, just like in a traditional system.
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