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GMC 2-Ton

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GMC 2-Ton - information: GMC 2-Ton is a very good car, that was released by "GMC" company. We collected the best 10 photos of GMC 2-Ton on this page.

Brand Name GMC
Model GMC 2-Ton
Number of views 14001 views
Model's Rate 6.6 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • Hyundai preps prestige onslaught.

    HYUNDAI’S ambitions for its Genesis luxury spin-off brand stepped up two gears with the revelation it will launch six new models in the next four years, including two crossovers and a premium sports coupe. Genesis will also benefit from Hyundai’s ‘N’ department, similar to BMW’s M Division, which will be tasked with turning out highlyfocused sporting versions of many Hyundai and Genesis models, including a twin-turbocharged Coupe to rival the BMW M4. Hyundai is empire-building, and sparing no expense as it goes after the posh end of town. The Korean company that made its name in the 1990s producing cut-price cars is now focusing on the lucrative prestige market. Not only has Hyundai grabbed Luc Donckerwolke, a Belgian designer with experience at Audi, Lamborghini and Bentley, it has also poached the previous boss of BMW M, Albert Biermann, to lead its engineering team. If that wasn’t enough, in late 2015 it lured Lamborghini’s director of brand and design, Manfred Fitzgerald, to head up its Genesis luxury brand globally. The Genesis brand will stand above Hyundai in a similar way that Lexus does to Toyota. It will have six dedicated new models - not shared with Hyundai models - by 2020 to not only help differentiate it from its parent but carve a slice of the premium market from BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz. The first car to fly the flag for Genesis globally will be the Equus replacement revealed at the 2016 Detroit show as the Genesis G90, a large rear-drive luxury sedan to rival 7 Series and S-Class. The G90 will be powered by a choice of the company’s new 272kW 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6, the existing 3.8-litre V6 offered in the Australian Genesis sedan, and a 5.0-litre V8. It has huge potential in North America and China, but there are no plans for right-hand drive, so it won’t come to Australia. Mid-2016, the Hyundai Genesis sedan that introduced the brand name to Australia will be rechristened Genesis G80 and be treated to a light spec and mechanical update. It’s unlikely to get the 3.3-litre turbo until a later, more comprehensive upgrade, though the existing 3.8-litre V6 may come in for performance and efficiency improvements. In 2017, Genesis will launch its first all-new model on an all-new platform, a Mercedes C-Class rival badged G70. This mid-size car, likely to be revealed in concept form at the New York show in late March and powered by the 3.3 twin-turbo V6, will initially be offered as a sedan; a coupe will follow in late-2017 or 2018, while a convertible is also a possibility. Hyundai USA president Dave Zuchowski told Wheels the G70 will be the first car to show what Genesis is really capable of. “This BMW 3 Series-fighter is the first real lightning flash that comes down in terms of ‘Wow, these guys are really working’,” he said. Both the sedan and coupe will be prime candidates for the nascent N performance division, led by former BMW M boss Biermann. It’s not known whether it will turn the wick up on the 3.3-litre V6, or add two more cylinders to produce a 4.4-litre twin-turbo V8 to go up against AMG’s 375kW V8TT and BMW’s 317kW twin-turbo six. An alternative to Hyundai’s existing 5.0-litre V8 is needed because it’s on borrowed time. Biermann all but ruled it out for the G70, saying, “For the future … if you go to performance it might be you need to go to turbo”. Zuchowski also confirmed that Genesis will launch two crossovers by 2020. “Think of [them] as [BMW] X3 and X5, one based off of the [new] platform, one based off Genesis platform.” No names were given for these cars, but both are surely candidates for N performance packs to rival the X3M and X5M. “This isn’t just something we’re talking about; this is something we’re throwing considerable resources, people and dollars against,” Zuchowski said. “And some people may never accept that ... they can’t come to terms with it. And that’s fine. In reality, in a blind taste test if you will, these cars are going to be outstanding.” Hyundai Australia is excited by the opportunities presented by the Genesis brand’s coming product portfolio. While the G90 is ruled out, each new model in the line-up will be considered.
  • 2017 SUZUKI GSX-R1000 CONCEPT.

    Racers and sportbike riders have been waiting impatiently for several years now for an updated Suzuki literbike, but the end is in sight: At the EICMA show last November, the company finally unveiled a new GSX-R1000. But while the new bike was labeled as a 2017 model, it was also called a “concept,” indicating there may still be work to be completed before it reaches production. Suzuki says that the goal for the new bike was to create the “most powerful, hardest-accelerating, cleanest-running GSX-R ever built,” and the “lightest, most aerodynamic, and best-handling GSX-R1000 ever.” To that end, the bike benefits from lessons learned from the GSX-RR MotoGP project. Specifically, the GSX-R uses what Suzuki refers to as a “Broad Power System,” intended to maximize top-end power without sacrificing low-end and midrange torque via four new features: variable valve timing, valves operated by finger followers, top-feed fuel injectors, and dual SET valves in the exhaust headers. Suzuki’s Variable Valve Timing System utilizes a ball-and-groove arrangement on the intake camshaft, activated by centrifugal force stacking the balls in different grooves. As rpm increases, the intake cam is retarded, optimizing cam timing over the rpm range. The new valve train also uses a finger follower setup to improve valve control and reduce moving mass in the top end, allowing increased valve lift and higher peak rpm. The top-feed fuel injectors are located in the airbox (they were previously mounted in the throttle bodies) to better atomize the fuel for more top-end power, again without sacrificing low-rpm output. And the final part of the Broad Power System is Suzuki Exhaust Tuning-Alpha, which utilizes a butterfl y valve between the number one and four exhaust headers and another between the number two and three headers. The valves remain closed at lower rpm to enhance torque and open at higher rpm for more power. Another goal for the engine was to “optimize dimensions to enhance cornering performance” as well as make the chassis as compact as possible. The frame is all new and has revised geometry, though again no numbers were given. Suspension consists of a Showa Balance Free Fork and Balance Free Rear Cushion shock very similar to those used on the 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R; the fork has external nitrogen-charged oil reservoirs and external damping circuits, and the shock is Showa’s latest iteration of the BFRC and is significantly lighter. Other chassis updates include high-volume intake ducts, a lower top and sleeker design for the fuel tank, and more aerodynamic bodywork. Even the fairing mounting bolts have been redesigned, with a new fl at-top shape to reduce air resistance, with other mounting hardware recessed to prevent turbulence. No mention was made of the new GSX-R’s brakes aside from the use of electronic ABS, but the calipers are very similar to the previous model’s Brembo four-pot monoblock units. The rotors, however, appear to be a variant of Brembo’s T-drive discs, with half the traditional buttons replaced by T-shaped pins. According to Brembo, the assembly system transfers braking force more effectively, is lighter, and has greater resistance to thermo-mechanical stress. A single-valve ride-by-wire throttle assembly replaces the old model’s dual-valve setup, and the electronics package now features a 10-level traction control system, three power modes, a quickshifter that works on upshifts as well as downshifts, and launch control. The press material contains no mention of an IMU as part of the electronics package; in this regard the GSX-R may be a step behind the YZF-R1 and new ZX-10R, but this is one aspect that could very well change before the bike reaches production. No word was given on price or availability for the new model, but with race teams the world over clamoring for the updated platform, it’s a safe bet the new bike will be a very-early-release 2017 model.
  • THE FORGOTTEN TWIN.

    With naked bikes suddenly gaining favor with US consumers after decades of resistance, the manufacturers are tripping over themselves rushing bodywork-less bikes to the market. BMW already took advantage of its S 1000 four-cylinder platform to get into the action with its S 1000 R in 2014 , but ironically it’s already had a naked bike for years in boxer twin form. And with the R 1200 R finally getting the new-generation wasserboxer engine for 2015 (along with other upgrades), BMW has brought that model in as well to cover all its bases in the naked-bike arena. Utilizing the same DOHC, 1,170cc fl at opposed-twin powerplant that propels the latest R 1200 GS/GS Adventure, RT, and new RS model, the R 1200 R makes full use of the claimed 125 hp at 7,750 rpm and 92 footpounds of torque at 6,500 rpm. In fact, the R 1200 R is actually claimed to have slightly better torque at low rpm than the GS/GS Adventure and RT because of its different airbox and muffl er setup to work with the R’s naked styling. Add to that reduced weight to push around (the claimed curb weight of the R is 508 pounds, while the GS and GS Adventure weigh 525 and 573 pounds, respectively, and the RT scales in at 604 pounds) and you have the makings of a much livelier boxer twin. The new R 1200 R retains the standard ASC (Automatic Stability Control) system combining traction control and ABS, but it now includes two riding modes, Road and Rain, with Rain mode obviously tailoring the throttle response, power, and ASC for slippery conditions. There’s an optional Ride Modes Pro that employs an internal inertial motion sensor to offer additional Dynamic and User ride modes. Dynamic ride mode uses the lean angle sensor to tailor the traction control much better than the standard ASC and allows the throttle response to be much more direct, while User mode allows custom setup of the ride mode using any of the various parameters. For 2015, the R 1200 R gets a new tubular steel frame that jettisons front of the engine), with the Paralever single-sided swingarm rear suspension returning. Optional ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) that allows tool-less spring preload and damping adjustments returns with the addition of the latest-generation Dynamic ESA that uses the aforementioned inertial motion sensor and a linear potentiometer on the shock to change damping at both ends automatically according to riding conditions. Dual 320mm discs and Brembo four-piston calipers handle braking duties up front, with a single 276mm disc and two-piston fl oating caliper out back. The R (in stock form, at least) is apparently aimed toward shorter riders, as not only was I able to easily put both feet fl at on the ground with my 30-inch inseam despite the listed 31-inch seat height, but legroom felt a bit cramped. Add the seemingly tall perch of the tapered aluminum conventional handlebar, and we thought perhaps our testbike might have been fitted with the accessory shorter seat (29.9 inches) by mistake, but it wasn’t. Anyone around 5-foot-7 or taller will likely want to fit the accessory “high rider’s” seat (32.3 inches) or “sport rider’s” seat (33 inches). There’s no doubt that the R model boxer has livelier acceleration than any of its other R 1200 series counterparts, a likely by-product of its lesser heft. The usual manageable grunt right off idle permits effortlessly rapid takeoffs from a stoplight, and there’s plenty of midrange punch to easily dart past traffic on the road or highway. Even in its latest-generation guise, the boxer doesn’t pretend to be a twin-cylinder superbike, so while the engine continues to make good power on up near its 8,000-rpm redline, it’s not as exciting as, say, Yamaha’s FZ-09 triple-but it does get the job done effi- ciently with little fuss. Throttle response was smooth and amiable in the Road setting (smooth enough that the muted response of the Rain mode isn’t necessary in our opinion); our test unit wasn’t equipped with the Riding Mode Pro option, so we weren’t able to experience the “direct” throttle response of the Dynamic mode. Our R model came equipped with the Dynamic ESA option, and we found it to work well at keeping the chassis composed during acceleration and braking while offering reasonable compliance on the highway. We’ve never been big fans of the Telelever front end because of the numb feedback it gives during corner entry, and there’s a definite improvement in front-end feel with the conventional inverted fork on the new R. Our only gripe would be some harshness over sharp-edged bumps in the Dynamic setting, which isn’t present in the Road damping setting. Steering is delightfully nimble yet stable and neutral, allowing quick line changes or traffic avoidance maneuvers with little effort. There’s also a decent amount of ground clearance, even with the standard centerstand. Braking from the ABS-equipped (which can be switched off) system is strong and responsive, hauling down the R easily with no drama. Aiding in that lack of drama was our R model’s Gear Shift Assistant Pro feature that allows clutchless downshifts as well as upshifts, permitting you to rapid-fire down through the gears without worrying about throttle blipping. And thankfully the version on the boxer isn’t plagued with the vague feel and action of the S 1000 unit. At $13,950 for the base version (with optional packages boosting the price to more than $17,000 ), the BMW R 1200 R certainly isn’t for the average naked-bike rider. It’s obviously not the most powerful, the most stylish, or the most economical machine in the class. But if you love that boxer twin power and handling along with a good dose of modern technology in a roadster design, the R 1200 R is certainly worth a look.
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