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Great Wall Safe

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Great Wall Safe - information: Great Wall Safe is a very good car, that was released by "Great Wall" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Great Wall Safe on this page.

Brand Name Great Wall
Model Great Wall Safe
Number of views 82759 views
Model's Rate 5.6 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Dragster RR LH44.

    The Dragster RR LH44 is the second new model for 2016 from Schiranna. MV Agusta claim this is a truly exclusive machine inspired by F1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton’s passion for MV Agusta. The Mercedes AMG Petronas driver collaborated with the MV Agusta designers, contributing to the definition of over 50 design details to make the LH44 stand out from the standard Dragster RR. Most of these changes are manufactured in Ergal and carbon-fibre with a 3K opaque finish. In terms of graphics, the LH44 was inspired by the graphics on the threetime world champion’s helmet and features a white colour scheme and the panther logo, which is also sewn into the quiltfinish Alcantara saddle. Needless to say, Lewis’s number 44 features on the exhaust manifolds and autographed screen. Production will be limited to 244 bikes.
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
  • MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV 2.0 MIVEC GX4h.

    Bandwagons have rarely looked as tasty as this. Mitsubishi’s first PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) looked like a confused fish, but now it has design bite and a sparkle in its LED eyes. If it means business, it brings a market report that makes irresistible reading: in the last 12 months, around 39,000 hybrid cars have sold in the UK, a rise of around 7,000 on the previous year. And this is the star of that sales storm, Britain’s number one plug-in hybrid. Not that I initially felt turned on. My car was delivered by an expert called Dave. I gave him a lift to the railway station, but by the time we’d got to the drop-off bay, I began to wish he’d stay. After all, the boot’s quite roomy, even with all those batteries aboard. It wasn’t that Dave was great company (though if you’re reading this, Dave, it was nice to meet you), but just more that the initial prospect of a gear-free gizmo with steering paddles that effectively operate braking, with buttons that allow you to bank energy options, and with more than a Maplin’s worth of electrical socketry… well, let’s just say that as I drove off, I wondered if the handbrake might also cunningly adjust the fridge back at home. I certainly knew how Laika must have felt when those Russians packed her off in Sputnik 2: forget range anxiety, I needed to conquer technology terror first. But unlike a doomed dog I soon began to relax. Within two days, I was a first-class ecoheaded guru, mentally kerchinging full-on B5 regeneration mode on a 1:10 slope, tutting knowingly at the elastic nature of what is forecast to be a mile of battery juice (in the Outer Cotswolds, it can be mere furlongs) and laughing sarcastically at the difference between a functioning charge point and the sort supermarkets brag about (thanks, Sainsbury’s) which, when driven to, “don’t work and never have, mate, not since it was installed on day one’. Mitsubishi won’t tell you, but this car also comes with an anorak as standard. You think you'll not need it, but you’ll soon be zipped in snugly. The reason? E-driving is addictive. Think about it: rationally, it’s the last avenue of motoring pleasure open to any sane driver out there. Drive wisely, zap regularly (from home at about 50p a pop) and a brave new world of fiscal freedom beckons. Before you know it, you’re a moth to that elusive candle of perpetual motion. Be warned though: egg-shell throttling and B5-level regeneration spells inordinate use of the brake lights, which now kick in because, as Dave told me, regeneration has the same net effect as steady braking. Could this spell expensive dentistry for BMW drivers, I ask Dave. We agreed that, all told, we must make sure that the planet comes first. Shunt stress aside, the PHEV soon proves to be as much fun with batteries as anything roadgoing. For me, at least. Five hundred miles in, I show my wife we’re achieving the kind of mpg fossil fuellists can only dream about. Yes, she says, but driving at 29mph might not always be practical. And those other drivers… maybe that’s not friendly waving? She takes the car to work though, and while I haven’t monitored her journey GCHQstyle (it may well be a Bluetooth option), I snoop on her data and see she’s been wearing that anorak as well. Not that the PHEV’s incapable of driving like you forgot to turn the chip pan off. In a few hundred yards of thoughtless abandon, I floored it to see how it liked a bit of action. It was, as they say, up for it, though that two tonnes of bodyweight did make me think of a Labrador suffering from greyhound delusions. Still, I’m not sure Mitsubishi’s seeking product placement in the next Bond movie, so maybe it's a moot point. A snap verdict? I love it. It’s early days, but my PHEV’s got my expectations on maximum charge.
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