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Hafei Minyi Van

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Hafei Minyi Van - information: Hafei Minyi Van is a very good car, that was released by "Hafei" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Hafei Minyi Van on this page.

Brand Name Hafei
Model Hafei Minyi Van
Number of views 49146 views
Model's Rate 6.1 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • RECREATING HISTORY.

    A stunningMoto Guzzi V8 works racer replica looks certain to steal the show at Coys sale at theMCNLondonMotorcycle Show at Excel on February 13. The bike was built in the early 2000s by ex-factory technicians with access to original drawings and spares to use as patterns to make new components. Coys haven’t provided an estimate but, with only two original V8 racers existing, the parade-ready replica should attract a three-figure sum. Other bikes from the same Italian collection to be offered at Excel include a gorgeous 1957 Ducati 125cc Bialbero racer (estimate ?65,000-70,000), a rare 1955 100cc Cecatto Bialbero racer (?29,000-35,000), a 1938 250cc Benelli Bialbero race bike (?48,000-52,000) and a 1931 1300cc Indian Type 402 four, fully restored in 2010 with minimal mileage since (?55,000-65,000). Entries for the capital’s only motorcycle-only sale scheduled for 2016 are still open and the catalogue - which will be available on January 25 - closes on January 19. Entry fees are ?350 per bike and buyers’ and sellers’ commission is set at 10% plus VAT. Over 100 lots are promised for the sale, which starts at 2.30pm on Saturday February 13 (viewing from February 12). Potential vendors contact Anthony Godin (07854 213928 or 0208 614 7888).
  • JAGUAR news.

    Prices have been announced for four-wheel-drive editions of Jaguar’s brand new XE saloon, with the drivetrain paired exclusively to the 178bhp 2.0-litre Ingenium diesel engine and ZF-sourced eight-speed automatic transmission. Offered with a choice of four trim levels - SE, Prestige, R-Sport and Portfolio - prices start at Ј33,825 and rise to Ј37,225. CO2 emissions are nudged up a notch to 123g/km, compared to 109g/km on rearwheel- drive editions, with fuel economy on the combined cycle rated at 60.1mpg compared to 67.3mpg. The extra reassurance of four-wheel-drive comes at a time when one of its biggest rivals, the BMW 3 Series, is selling well in xDrive guise. Couple that with Audi’s A4 quattro that has been around for years, and it’s clear that there is demand for all-wheel-drive in a compact executive car. Other changes for the 2017 model year XE include the availability of Jaguar’s new InControl Touch Pro infotainment system, incorporating a 10.2-inch touchscreen. In addition, for Apple Watch users, a new InControl Remote smartphone app allows owners to lock and unlock the car, check how much fuel is left in the tank, and get an update on the car’s location. It’s also possible to set the climate control to heat or cool the cabin, and start the car remotely to gain a perfect temperature before you even venture outside of the front door. The latest XE is on sale now at Jaguar retailers, with the first cars set to arrive early next year.
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
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