World Encyclopedia of Cars
The best old cars, news and reviews about old cars. Stay in touch!

Heinkel Rollerkabine

All Heinkel Photos

Heinkel Rollerkabine - information: Heinkel Rollerkabine is a very good car, that was released by "Heinkel" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Heinkel Rollerkabine on this page.

Brand Name Heinkel
Model Heinkel Rollerkabine
Number of views 98264 views
Model's Rate 5.6 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro.

    You’ve probably already read about Audi’s grand plans for electrification of its model range, and soon it’ll have a second plug-in hybrid model to sell alongside the A3 e-tron launched earlier in the year. This time around the German firm has taken a different route, pairing the 3.0-litre TDI engine from the Q7 with a 126bhp electric motor, which together develop a mighty 369bhp and 516lb ft of torque. Owners will be able to travel up to around 34 miles, depending on the climate, which Audi reckons will be just enough for the daily commute to and from work for the average motorist. Three intelligent driving modes - EV, hybrid and battery hold - can work in tandem with the navigation system for best efficiency thanks to what Audi calls a predictive efficiency assistant. The price tag for all of this technology has yet to be revealed, but is expected to be Ј60k after Government grants, which is a hefty premium over the regular diesel editions. For anyone that’s expecting to see a whole load of electronic trickery, you’ll be disappointed, because the Q7 e-tron looks decidedly like any other diesel Q7, though the instruments have been altered to take into account of the electric motor, including the excellent Virtual Cockpit fitted to our test car. Beautifully finished, soft-touch materials are used throughout the cabin, delivering a high quality ambience. While the driving position is suitably command-like, the height of the dashboard is relatively low and so isn’t quite as imposing as other large SUVs. Supportive seats, a wide range of adjustments to both the chairs and the steering wheel mean that just about anyone can get a comfortable driving position. The cabin is simply huge, and whereas conventionally powered Q7s come with seven-seats as standard, due to the hybrid gubbins, there’s just five here. But that’s just fine as there’s generous space to spread out both front and rear. Boot space is inevitably smaller, but just 120 litre have been lost due to electrification. That still leaves a sizeable 650 litres with the seats up, and an expansive 1,835 litres with the chairs down. Performance is effortless, with smooth, linear acceleration no matter which source of power is being used. While in electric-mode, it’s eerily quiet, with only a distant sound from the tyres to be heard. The engine cuts in almost imperceptibly, with none of the vibrations that rival hybrids were afflicted with. Even with the diesel engine in action, sounds are nicely muted, with the cabin of the Q7 a calm place to travel. There’s a fluid feel to the steering with nice weighting that allows for accurate, precise cornering, and despite its bulk, this e-tron Q7 feels relatively light on its wheels. It handles flatly with little sign of body roll, backed up with huge amounts of grip. The only fly in the ointment is that of brake pedal feel that at times doesn’t inspire total confidence. Ride comfort is impressive, delivering a magic carpet-like ride from its adjustable adaptive suspension.
  • Porsche North America Racing achieve podiums at Daytona.

    Porsche North America Racing started the 2016 WeatherTech United SportsCar Championship with a third place finish in the GTLM class at the 54th Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona. The no.912 Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber, Frйdйric Makowiecki and Michael Christensen battled through an unusually attritional race to take the final step on the podium, although it was nearly so much more for the factory Porsche squad. A wet qualifying session on the Thursday, disrupted by torrential rain, saw the no.911 and no.912 Porsches lock out the front row of the grid in the hands of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki respectively. Such was the GTLM field’s dominance in the wet, the two 911 RSRs actually set the fastest times overall but, thanks to IMSA’s rules, would be forced to start behind the prototype machinery. During the race’s opening hour, Tandy (as is now becoming customary in the USCC) raced into an early lead as the no.912 dropped back into a dogfight with the works Corvettes and BMWs. By the six-hour mark, the two factory Porsches crossed the line onetwo, with the no.911 still narrowly leading. However, through the night - heavily disrupted by multiple full-course caution periods - the momentum swung toward the no. 912 RSR. By dawn, the 54th Rolex 24 had boiled down to a battle between the two Porsches and the no.3 and no.4 Corvette duo. But, with Kйvin Estre at the wheel, the no.911 slowed dramatically on the banking with around five hours to go, a broken driveshaft forcing a lengthy stop for repairs leaving the no.912 to battle on alone. Patrick Pilet would eventually re-emerge in the 2015 championship-winning entry to help it on its way to some useful points in eighth place. After the final round of stops inside the last hour, Bamber found himself once again in the class lead. However, after being hunted down by Oliver Gavin in the no.4 Corvette, the Kiwi racer was nudged out of the lead at the turn five hairpin. With around 20 minutes remaining, the second Chevrolet - in the hands of Antonio Garcia - also found a way through, this time at the Bus Stop chicane, leaving Bamber to watch on as the two Corvettes fought it out for victory. Despite coming close, the two GM cars never came to blows, as Bamber brought the no.912 machine home in third for the crew’s first podium since ViR last August.
  • 2016 YAMAHAS.

    New, More Affordable R1S If there is any one downside to the continued evolution of sportbikes it’s cost: The more advanced production motorcycles become, the more expensive they become as well. And while for some that trade-off is justifiable, there are still those consumers who simply aren’t willing to gut their bank account for the exotic materials and technologies that make modern motorcycles the track weapons they are today. For those consumers, Yamaha has introduced its YZF-R1S, which uses cost-effective materials to cut the suggested retail price of the otherwise stellar R1 by $1,500, to “just” $14,990. If your immediate thought is that Yamaha must have taken everything that made the R1 great and thrown it out the door (electronics included), then rest assured that’s not necessarily the case. Instead, with the R1S, Yamaha has gone in and replaced the titanium connecting rods with steel ones and magnesium outer parts and fasteners like the oil pan and right-side engine covers to aluminum ones. Engine cover bolts are now steel instead of aluminum, while wheels are now manufactured from aluminum instead of magnesium and wrapped in Bridgestone Battlax S20 sport tires instead of the R1/R1M’s trackday-intentioned RS10s. The exhaust header piping is also now made from stainless steel rather than titanium. The overall result of all this material swapping is a 9-pound jump in claimed curb weight. The R1/R1M’s MotoGP-inspired electronics package with power modes, traction control, slide control, launch control, and wheelie control goes untouched, though on the R1S, the quickshifter will come as an option rather than as standard equipment. There are a few other changes, including updates to the ECU that are intended to suit the new engine specification. The switch to steel connecting rods from titanium in the R1S means the redline needed to be reduced, the result being slightly less top-end power than the standard R1. Yamaha has yet to quote any numbers, but in published dyno charts (which are devoid of any numbers), it appears that the R1S’s redline is at 12,500 rpm instead of the R1’s 14,000 rpm, with the power loss at the very top around 5 or so horsepower. The R1S is available in either a red/white/ black color scheme or matte gray motif, and the bike is expected to be available beginning in February. New XSR 900 and Updated FJR 1300 The growing “hipster/caf? racer” culture is catching the attention of the OEMs, with Yamaha and its new XSR900 for 2016 being the latest example. The XSR retains the FZ-09’s excellent 847cc crossplane three-cylinder engine and Controlled Filling Die-Cast aluminum frame and swingarm with adjustable KYB suspension but adds styling components and details that harken back to the “heritage, authenticity, and simplicity” of the sporting motorcycles from the ’70s and ’80s. The XSR gets the FZ’s three YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) riding modes, but it also gets a two-level (plus off) traction control system as well as ABS as standard equipment. An assist/ slipper clutch eases lever effort by a claimed 20 percent while also helping to smooth out downshifts. Everything else mechanically (save for suspension settings) is basically identical to the FZ. Ergonomically, the XSR’s 32.7-inch seat height is 15mm higher than the FZ’s, and the rider’s seating position is moved 50mm rearward to make for a slightly more aggressive riding posture. Styling is the XSR’s main focus. There’s plenty of nice metal bracketry and components where plastic or other materials would normally be used. For example, the nice-looking fuel tank cover on the matte gray/ aluminum version (there’s also one in the 60th Anniversary yellow/black traditional Yamaha motif) is a brushed-aluminum piece that Yamaha says has an actual hand-buffed finish. A single round halogen headlight is held by aluminum brackets, and a round LED taillight mounted atop a metal (aluminum) fender replicate the look of the ’70s caf? racer. The seat features burgundy-colored faux suede leather panels and red stitching. The single round instrument gauge recalls the older style in shape, but in function it jumps to present-day technology with a full LCD info panel. All told, the XSR900 comes in 16 pounds heavier than the FZ-09 according to Yamaha, at a claimed 430 pounds full of fuel. The matte gray/aluminum XSR900 will be available in April, while the 60th Anniversary version will be available slightly later this year in May. Also new for 2016 from Yamaha is the latest FJR1300, in both A (standard) and ES (Electronic Suspension) models. The biggest change for both editions is a six-speed transmission replacing the old five-speed, with a slipper/assist clutch. A new LED headlight and taillight along with slightly revised bodywork complete the revisions for the A model, while the ES gets all that plus a new “lean-angle sensitive” cornering LED light setup that uses three LEDs on each side above the quad-element headlights that light up progressively as the bike leans to more effectively illuminate the road ahead in corners. The 2016 FJR will be available in March; no prices for either the new FJR1300 or XSR900 were available at press time.
Top Heinkel models
Popular Searches
World Encyclopedia of Cars
Copyright 2015. All rights under protection.