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Hitachi Zaxis 650 LC

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Hitachi Zaxis 650 LC - information: Hitachi Zaxis 650 LC is a very good car, that was released by "Hitachi" company. We collected the best 8 photos of Hitachi Zaxis 650 LC on this page.

Brand Name Hitachi
Model Hitachi Zaxis 650 LC
Number of views 96629 views
Model's Rate 5.3 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • NEW 2016 KAWASAKI ZX-10R.

    With World Superbike regulations becoming ever stricter with regard to modifications, manufacturers have to make sure their production models already have the proper pieces in place. And after winning two World Superbike championships in the past three years, Kawasaki shows that it’s serious about staying at the top of the superbike heap with its all-new 2016 ZX-10R. All of the extensive updates to Team Green’s new literbike were gleaned from lessons learned in WSBK competition and intended to make sure the factory team has a solid base to start from for the coming season. Engine Other than the previous engine’s bore and stroke, there’s little carried over between the old and new ZX-10R. The new crankshaft is lighter for quicker response and improved handling, with a correspondingly lighter balance shaft and rod journals that have a new coating for reduced friction at higher rpm. New 5-gram-lighter pistons, cams with more overlap, and a new airbox (25 percent more volume and air filter with 60 percent more surface area for better fl ow) work with an all-new cylinder head featuring reworked and polished intake and exhaust ports (previously only the intake ports were polished) plus revised combustion chambers. The titanium exhaust valves increase in size 1mm to 25.5mm, and cylinder-wall thickness was increased slightly for a more rigid engine block. The titanium alloy headers use a new heat-resistant alloy that allows thinner wall thickness for reduced weight, and the titanium exhaust canister has 50 percent more volume for better fl ow without increased sound levels. The intake portion of the frame’s steering head was modified to quell intake honk, allowing some freedom in the exhaust for more power without exceeding strict noise restrictions. The transmission remains a racing-style cassette design for quick and easy internal gearing changes. Gear ratios are closer for track use, with shorter ratios in all but first gear. The slipper clutch is 130 grams lighter, and some of the gears have dry-film lubricant coating to reduce friction. A contactless- sensor-equipped quickshifter similar to the H2R is standard, with the optional Kawasaki race ECU offering clutchless downshifts as well. Electronics The new ZX-10R utilizes a Bosch five-axis IMU with software developed in-house at Kawasaki that allows the unit to calculate yaw rate from other sensors, resulting in six-axis operation. This allows the IMU to sense changes in pavement elevation, camber, and the motorcycle’s position relative to them, as well as discern different tire profiles so that the bike is not restricted to just the OEM tires. The Sport-Kawasaki TRaction Control (S-KTRC) system now has five modes of operation instead of three as with the previous ZX-10R. Modes 1 and 2 are designed for racing, while mode 3 is for a “dry circuit with highgrip tires,” mode 4 is for “dry canyon roads or commuting,” and mode 5 is intended for wet pavement use. The Keihin 47mm throttle bodies utilize an electronic ride-by-wire throttle system to control power in addition to ignition retardation. With the Bosch IMU, Kawasaki was able to produce its own version of the cornering ABS that has seen usage on KTM and BMW motorcycles. Kawasaki’s system is called Cornering Management Function and changes braking pressure according to the bike’s lean and pitch angles to prevent it from standing up under braking in a corner. Another new addition is the Kawasaki Launch Control Mode (KLCM), with three modes available. And Kawasaki Engine Braking Control-first seen on the supercharged H2R-manages engine back-torque. Lastly, there are three selectable power modes for the new ZX-10R: Full, Middle (providing approximately 80 percent power), or Low (allowing 60 percent power). Chassis The new Ninja’s frame has also been redone, with the steering head moved rearward 7.5mm closer to the rider, while the swingarm has been lengthened 15.8mm (in addition to extra bracing for more torsional rigidity), resulting in more front weight bias. Wheelbase is now listed as 56.7 inches, almost a half inch longer than its predecessor. An all-new Showa Balance Free Fork featuring an external damping valve chamber utilizes a design similar to the ?hlins TTX/FGR concept, with the rebound and compression damping valves completely separated so that the oil only flows in one direction through the valves; in conjunction with nitrogen pressurization in the damping chamber, this keeps the pressure on both sides of the valves as consistent as possible, drastically reducing cavitation that results in inconsistent damping. The rear Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion (BFRC) shock uses the same concept in its damping valves, and the shock linkage has been revised to allow a broader range of adjustment. Brakes have also been fully upgraded, with Brembo M50 monoblock aluminum calipers with 30mm pistons biting on huge 330mm discs for awesome stopping power. A Brembo radial-action master cylinder equipped with steel-braided brake lines ensures positive and responsive feel at the lever as well as better consistency. Wheels are one of the few components that haven’t been changed, though they are now shod with Bridgestone RS10 street/track rubber in 120/70-17 front and 190/55-17 rear sizes. Bodywork has undergone some restyling, with the windscreen improved for better aerodynamics. Overall weight is claimed at 450 pounds wet with all fluids and a full tank of fuel for the non-ABS model, 454 pounds wet for the ABS model. List prices are $14,999 for the standard ZX-10R, $15,299 for the Special Edition paint, $15,999 for the ZX-10R ABS model, and $16,299 for the ZX-10R ABS with Special Edition paint scheme. How will all of these changes affect Kawasaki’s performance in World Superbike and on the showroom floor? We can’t wait to find out.
  • VAUXHALL news.

    When the Astra range was unveiled, Vauxhall shouted from the rooftops that its most frugal 1.6-litre CDTi ecoFLEX model was capable of emitting just 82g/km of CO2. But a couple of months on and the figures have been revised, and the reality isn’t quite as favourable, with 88g/km the newly quoted figure for hatchback editions. This results in the fuel economy on the combined cycle amounts changing from 91.2mpg to 85.6mpg - a reduction of 5.6mpg. Customers that have ordered vehicles based on the more favourable figures will no doubt be disappointed and perhaps question whether this was a deliberate ploy to hit headlines. And the same issue affects the most powerful 1.6-litre CDTi Biturbo editions with 108g/km previously quoted, whereas in reality the actual figure is now 111g/km. This not only results in a fuel economy figure that is 1.6mpg lower, but it also means an extra Ј10 per year to purchase the vehicle excise duty. Despite the amendments, the prices of all Astra models remain the same as before.
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