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Irannational Paykan Pick-up

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Irannational Paykan Pick-up - information: Irannational Paykan Pick-up is a very good car, that was released by "Irannational" company. We collected the best 8 photos of Irannational Paykan Pick-up on this page.

Brand Name Irannational
Model Irannational Paykan Pick-up
Number of views 118095 views
Model's Rate 7.4 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV 2.0 MIVEC GX4h.

    Bandwagons have rarely looked as tasty as this. Mitsubishi’s first PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) looked like a confused fish, but now it has design bite and a sparkle in its LED eyes. If it means business, it brings a market report that makes irresistible reading: in the last 12 months, around 39,000 hybrid cars have sold in the UK, a rise of around 7,000 on the previous year. And this is the star of that sales storm, Britain’s number one plug-in hybrid. Not that I initially felt turned on. My car was delivered by an expert called Dave. I gave him a lift to the railway station, but by the time we’d got to the drop-off bay, I began to wish he’d stay. After all, the boot’s quite roomy, even with all those batteries aboard. It wasn’t that Dave was great company (though if you’re reading this, Dave, it was nice to meet you), but just more that the initial prospect of a gear-free gizmo with steering paddles that effectively operate braking, with buttons that allow you to bank energy options, and with more than a Maplin’s worth of electrical socketry… well, let’s just say that as I drove off, I wondered if the handbrake might also cunningly adjust the fridge back at home. I certainly knew how Laika must have felt when those Russians packed her off in Sputnik 2: forget range anxiety, I needed to conquer technology terror first. But unlike a doomed dog I soon began to relax. Within two days, I was a first-class ecoheaded guru, mentally kerchinging full-on B5 regeneration mode on a 1:10 slope, tutting knowingly at the elastic nature of what is forecast to be a mile of battery juice (in the Outer Cotswolds, it can be mere furlongs) and laughing sarcastically at the difference between a functioning charge point and the sort supermarkets brag about (thanks, Sainsbury’s) which, when driven to, “don’t work and never have, mate, not since it was installed on day one’. Mitsubishi won’t tell you, but this car also comes with an anorak as standard. You think you'll not need it, but you’ll soon be zipped in snugly. The reason? E-driving is addictive. Think about it: rationally, it’s the last avenue of motoring pleasure open to any sane driver out there. Drive wisely, zap regularly (from home at about 50p a pop) and a brave new world of fiscal freedom beckons. Before you know it, you’re a moth to that elusive candle of perpetual motion. Be warned though: egg-shell throttling and B5-level regeneration spells inordinate use of the brake lights, which now kick in because, as Dave told me, regeneration has the same net effect as steady braking. Could this spell expensive dentistry for BMW drivers, I ask Dave. We agreed that, all told, we must make sure that the planet comes first. Shunt stress aside, the PHEV soon proves to be as much fun with batteries as anything roadgoing. For me, at least. Five hundred miles in, I show my wife we’re achieving the kind of mpg fossil fuellists can only dream about. Yes, she says, but driving at 29mph might not always be practical. And those other drivers… maybe that’s not friendly waving? She takes the car to work though, and while I haven’t monitored her journey GCHQstyle (it may well be a Bluetooth option), I snoop on her data and see she’s been wearing that anorak as well. Not that the PHEV’s incapable of driving like you forgot to turn the chip pan off. In a few hundred yards of thoughtless abandon, I floored it to see how it liked a bit of action. It was, as they say, up for it, though that two tonnes of bodyweight did make me think of a Labrador suffering from greyhound delusions. Still, I’m not sure Mitsubishi’s seeking product placement in the next Bond movie, so maybe it's a moot point. A snap verdict? I love it. It’s early days, but my PHEV’s got my expectations on maximum charge.
  • XR11 TR750 and an XR05 TR500.v SPEEDBLOCKS.

    Yamaha tapped into the American-inspired, yellow-and-black speedblock livery that the company has re-adopted to celebrate their 60th Anniversary. That was represented by a Kenny Roberts’ 1977 OW31 TZ750 (raced in F750) and an OW60 YZR 500 he raced to victory in the 1982 Argentine GP. Still in the blue Gauloises livery, though, was Christian Sarron’s YZR500, and in white and red was one of the Yamaha France Paris-Dakar XT500s from 1979. Headlining the stand was Yamaha’s Yard Build competition-winning V-Max ‘V-Speed’ by Liberty Yamaha - also in yellow and black.
  • FORD news.

    Enhancements to the C-MAX and Grand C-MAX with 1.5-litre TDCi engine and PowerShift gearbox has seen CO2 emissions tumble from 115 to 109g/km in the five-seat edition and 124 to 119g/km in the seven-seat Grand C-MAX model. It means that each version drops one vehicle excise duty band and in the case of the C-MAX, there’s a decease of two company car tax benefit-in kind brackets to 19 per cent. The Grand C-MAX drops one band to 21 per cent. Despite the enhanced efficiency, prices remain the same as before with the C-MAX Zetec 1.5 TDCi PowerShift costing Ј21,295 and rising to Ј26,395 for the Grand C-MAX Titaniumm X 1.5 TDCi PowerShift.
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