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Isuzu Bonnet Bus BX

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Isuzu Bonnet Bus BX - information: Isuzu Bonnet Bus BX is a very good car, that was released by "Isuzu" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Isuzu Bonnet Bus BX on this page.

Brand Name Isuzu
Model Isuzu Bonnet Bus BX
Number of views 14741 views
Model's Rate 8.4 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Improved Kyalami could host WEC.

    Porsche’s Kyalami Racing Circuit played host to the recent launch of the 991.2 Turbo and C4S (which you can read about beginning on page 20) and, after speaking with officials from the circuit, Total 911 can reveal there are plans in place to return the venue to the very top of the motorsporting calendar. Purchased at an auction in July 2014 by Porsche South Africa CEO and entrepreneur, Toby Venter, a total refurbishment of the facility and track commenced in May 2015, and is set to be finished by the end of May 2016, with a variety of new buildings and upgraded facilities already evident. The fully resurfaced track itself is wider in some areas, with a longer straight, and run-off areas have been greatly improved - all in line with FIA regulations. The track has an illustrious history of races and drivers to its name, including 18 Formula One Grands Prix hosted between 1967 and 1985, while legends such as Jacky Ickx, Alain Prost, Jim Clark, Nigel Mansell and Jackie Stewart have also raced there. Kyalami’s general manager refused to be drawn on speculation linking the circuit with an appearance on the WEC calendar when questioned by Total 911, but did confirm that several manufacturers have already booked the track for days on end towards the latter part of 2016. This is partly the reason why the track won’t be branded as ‘Porsche’, as it will be open for any manufacturer or brand to hire the facility. Once finished, there will also be a skid pan, a 1.1-kilometre handling circuit and an off-road training course. Needless to say, there is a lot more planned for this new world-class facility. Mr Venter is an avid Porsche racer, so we won’t be surprised if he plans to bring WEC and Formula One to South Africa, while journalists driving the circuit at the Turbo launch were impressed by the layout and on-track challenges. It is also quite possible that Porsche AG will conduct hot weather track testing there in the future. Although the company won’t be able to keep its cars away from prying eyes, perfect weather conditions will be present at the venue, which is also one of the highest altitude tracks in the world. Porsche AG has been conducting hot weather tests in South Africa for a number of years now, and having a track in the vicinity to add to its test schedule will be of considerable benefit.
  • Audi’s electrified future.

    The introduction of mild hybrids to Audi’s model range is set to edge efficiency ever closer to the kind of economy figures enjoyed by TDI owners. But it doesn’t mean the death of the diesel engine, as the introduction of cutting edge technology can be paired to both TDI diesel and TFSI petrol engines. Audi says that within ten years, its entire model range will feature the technology. The key elements of the new system are an 11 Ah capacity lithium-ion battery pack and belt starter generator, with the latter replacing the current starter motor. Coasting becomes possible from around 9mph upwards, so that if the driver takes their foot off the accelerator, the car will coast along for a short time with the engine off, saving fuel. It’s possible to recuperate up to 5kW (7bhp), with the generator returning that power, reducing fuel usage and boosting economy as a result. And while this system can be integrated into current 12-volt systems, Audi is on the verge of announcing that it will put a new 48-volt system into production, with a capacity of harnessing 12kW (16bhp), that will allow coasting for up to 30 seconds, delivering even better efficiency compared to the 12-volt system. The company first gave a glimpse at the technology in the Prologue Concept car last year at the Los Angeles motor show. Other benefits of the introduction of a 48-volt electrical system includes the ability to have much smaller cable cross sections, reducing the weight of the wiring harness, and because it has four times the power, there’s opportunities to add additional innovative technology for the suspension and drivetrain. Further into the future, Audi’s engineers plan to convert the auxiliary systems, like pumps, superchargers for the engine, transmission and air conditioning system to 48 volts. Today these are driven hydraulically or by the engine, but in the future they will be powered by electricity and lighter and more compact. Audi will soon announce an electromechanical active roll stabilisation system, which features an electric motor and a three-stage planetary gearbox that separates the two halves of the stabiliser from each other. For relaxed and comfortable driving, the two halves are decoupled, resulting in cossetting ride comfort. For the sportier driver, the tubes are interconnected and twist against each other, delivering a tauter, more dynamic ride, and less roll when cornering. The front and rear stabilisers can also be adjusted independently allowing even greater degrees of fine tuning. The system is also capable of harnessing energy, and the motor can act as a generator, converting it to electrical energy. But Audi’s engineers are already looking at a second, more advanced project using the 48-volt setup, though it is still in the very early prototype stage. Being developed under the working title of eROT, an electromechanical rotary damper replaces today’s hydraulic item. The system isn’t too far apart from the active roll stabilisation arrangement in terms of basic principles, but a strong lever arm absorbs all of the forces that occur on a bumpy road, and via a series of gears, the force is transmitted into an electric motor, which then converts it to electricity. Recuperation is, on average, around 150 watts on an average road, with a freshly resurfaced road generating as little as 3 watts, while a badly maintained country lane may generate as much as 613 watts. Over a cross section of different roads, CO2 emissions savings could be as much as 3g/ km or four to five mpg.
  • NORTON FLAT TRACK.

    This modern Norton dirt track custom is the work of Jamie Ireson’s 72Motorcycles, in collaboration with Norton Motorcycles - a tribute to the 1970s RonWood racing machine that won three Ascot track championship titles and was taken to a National dirt track victory by Alex Jorgenson. Based on a newCommando 961, it was recently launched at Motorcycle Live on the official NortonMotorcycles stand as the first of a limited edition run of 12. Ireson said: “The project started whenmy partnerMerryMichau photographed the 2014 Norton brochure. She toldNorton CEO Stuart Garner that I build custombikes and it went from there. Stuart asked us to come up with some ideas and it turned out that we had the same thoughts on building a custombike based on RonWood’s dirt tracker. Ireson is a design engineer by trade and used his experience gained in the automotive industry to model the bike in CAD before committing to metal. “The one thing we needed to do was lower the bike, and working in CAD with models that Norton supplied allowedme to see what effect that had.” That was November 2014 but it took until June 2015 for the project to take off. “Norton sent me a rolling chassis and engine unit with the only stipulation being that the bike had to be ready forMotorcycle Live at the NEC,” says Jamie. The engine and transmission are standard 961, as is the main frame, but Jamie modified the rear end. He says: “The RonWood bike has a really small oil tank, because it’s designed to only do a small number of laps. I cut off the end off the original tank, made up some bends on a CNCmachine and got themwelded up to follow the lines of Ron Wood’s [oil-carrying] frame.” According to Jamie, the standard Norton chassis geometry is slap bang in the middle of what is considered an ideal flat track set-up, but this build had to retain the standard 17in wheels. The swingarm is also standard, but with added bracing. The standard Ohlins forks were too long so Jamie opted for shorter, larger-diameter 58mm Ducati Panigale forks which slot into new yokes made from Jamie’s CAD drawings by Fastec Racing in Suffolk, who also did machining work on footpeg mounts and the velocity stacks. Jamie produced a buck for the tank, from which Parker Fabrication in Bournemouth produced the alloy tank. “The inspiration of the Ron Wood bike was the gorgeous red paintwork and tank graphics. We talked with out painters, Image Design, about giving it a modern twist, but they said it was so good we should leave it. The only change is using the current Norton logo.” The engine is standard, but Jamie’s removed the original airbox, so: “we might pick up anything between five and 10bhp.” The exhaust follows the same lines as the Ron Wood bike. It’s all custom made and hand-rolled by Tom at Foundry Motorcycles. The pipes have been given a super hard-wearing ceramic-coated black by Wes at Hi-Spec Coatings in West Sussex. Lasertech Engineering did all the frame welding. The Norton 961 MM Flat Track is priced at ?30,000. “All 12 will be identical except for the number,” says Jamie. “We’ve got 44. We’re keeping this original bike. Customers can have any number, but we won’t use one number twice.”
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