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Kaiser M-818

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Kaiser M-818 - information: Kaiser M-818 is a very good car, that was released by "Kaiser" company. We collected the best 7 photos of Kaiser M-818 on this page.

Brand Name Kaiser
Model Kaiser M-818
Number of views 22068 views
Model's Rate 9.9 out of 10
Number of images 7 images
Interesting News
  • 2016 YAMAHAS.

    New, More Affordable R1S If there is any one downside to the continued evolution of sportbikes it’s cost: The more advanced production motorcycles become, the more expensive they become as well. And while for some that trade-off is justifiable, there are still those consumers who simply aren’t willing to gut their bank account for the exotic materials and technologies that make modern motorcycles the track weapons they are today. For those consumers, Yamaha has introduced its YZF-R1S, which uses cost-effective materials to cut the suggested retail price of the otherwise stellar R1 by $1,500, to “just” $14,990. If your immediate thought is that Yamaha must have taken everything that made the R1 great and thrown it out the door (electronics included), then rest assured that’s not necessarily the case. Instead, with the R1S, Yamaha has gone in and replaced the titanium connecting rods with steel ones and magnesium outer parts and fasteners like the oil pan and right-side engine covers to aluminum ones. Engine cover bolts are now steel instead of aluminum, while wheels are now manufactured from aluminum instead of magnesium and wrapped in Bridgestone Battlax S20 sport tires instead of the R1/R1M’s trackday-intentioned RS10s. The exhaust header piping is also now made from stainless steel rather than titanium. The overall result of all this material swapping is a 9-pound jump in claimed curb weight. The R1/R1M’s MotoGP-inspired electronics package with power modes, traction control, slide control, launch control, and wheelie control goes untouched, though on the R1S, the quickshifter will come as an option rather than as standard equipment. There are a few other changes, including updates to the ECU that are intended to suit the new engine specification. The switch to steel connecting rods from titanium in the R1S means the redline needed to be reduced, the result being slightly less top-end power than the standard R1. Yamaha has yet to quote any numbers, but in published dyno charts (which are devoid of any numbers), it appears that the R1S’s redline is at 12,500 rpm instead of the R1’s 14,000 rpm, with the power loss at the very top around 5 or so horsepower. The R1S is available in either a red/white/ black color scheme or matte gray motif, and the bike is expected to be available beginning in February. New XSR 900 and Updated FJR 1300 The growing “hipster/caf? racer” culture is catching the attention of the OEMs, with Yamaha and its new XSR900 for 2016 being the latest example. The XSR retains the FZ-09’s excellent 847cc crossplane three-cylinder engine and Controlled Filling Die-Cast aluminum frame and swingarm with adjustable KYB suspension but adds styling components and details that harken back to the “heritage, authenticity, and simplicity” of the sporting motorcycles from the ’70s and ’80s. The XSR gets the FZ’s three YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) riding modes, but it also gets a two-level (plus off) traction control system as well as ABS as standard equipment. An assist/ slipper clutch eases lever effort by a claimed 20 percent while also helping to smooth out downshifts. Everything else mechanically (save for suspension settings) is basically identical to the FZ. Ergonomically, the XSR’s 32.7-inch seat height is 15mm higher than the FZ’s, and the rider’s seating position is moved 50mm rearward to make for a slightly more aggressive riding posture. Styling is the XSR’s main focus. There’s plenty of nice metal bracketry and components where plastic or other materials would normally be used. For example, the nice-looking fuel tank cover on the matte gray/ aluminum version (there’s also one in the 60th Anniversary yellow/black traditional Yamaha motif) is a brushed-aluminum piece that Yamaha says has an actual hand-buffed finish. A single round halogen headlight is held by aluminum brackets, and a round LED taillight mounted atop a metal (aluminum) fender replicate the look of the ’70s caf? racer. The seat features burgundy-colored faux suede leather panels and red stitching. The single round instrument gauge recalls the older style in shape, but in function it jumps to present-day technology with a full LCD info panel. All told, the XSR900 comes in 16 pounds heavier than the FZ-09 according to Yamaha, at a claimed 430 pounds full of fuel. The matte gray/aluminum XSR900 will be available in April, while the 60th Anniversary version will be available slightly later this year in May. Also new for 2016 from Yamaha is the latest FJR1300, in both A (standard) and ES (Electronic Suspension) models. The biggest change for both editions is a six-speed transmission replacing the old five-speed, with a slipper/assist clutch. A new LED headlight and taillight along with slightly revised bodywork complete the revisions for the A model, while the ES gets all that plus a new “lean-angle sensitive” cornering LED light setup that uses three LEDs on each side above the quad-element headlights that light up progressively as the bike leans to more effectively illuminate the road ahead in corners. The 2016 FJR will be available in March; no prices for either the new FJR1300 or XSR900 were available at press time.
  • 2017 SUZUKI GSX-R1000 CONCEPT.

    Racers and sportbike riders have been waiting impatiently for several years now for an updated Suzuki literbike, but the end is in sight: At the EICMA show last November, the company finally unveiled a new GSX-R1000. But while the new bike was labeled as a 2017 model, it was also called a “concept,” indicating there may still be work to be completed before it reaches production. Suzuki says that the goal for the new bike was to create the “most powerful, hardest-accelerating, cleanest-running GSX-R ever built,” and the “lightest, most aerodynamic, and best-handling GSX-R1000 ever.” To that end, the bike benefits from lessons learned from the GSX-RR MotoGP project. Specifically, the GSX-R uses what Suzuki refers to as a “Broad Power System,” intended to maximize top-end power without sacrificing low-end and midrange torque via four new features: variable valve timing, valves operated by finger followers, top-feed fuel injectors, and dual SET valves in the exhaust headers. Suzuki’s Variable Valve Timing System utilizes a ball-and-groove arrangement on the intake camshaft, activated by centrifugal force stacking the balls in different grooves. As rpm increases, the intake cam is retarded, optimizing cam timing over the rpm range. The new valve train also uses a finger follower setup to improve valve control and reduce moving mass in the top end, allowing increased valve lift and higher peak rpm. The top-feed fuel injectors are located in the airbox (they were previously mounted in the throttle bodies) to better atomize the fuel for more top-end power, again without sacrificing low-rpm output. And the final part of the Broad Power System is Suzuki Exhaust Tuning-Alpha, which utilizes a butterfl y valve between the number one and four exhaust headers and another between the number two and three headers. The valves remain closed at lower rpm to enhance torque and open at higher rpm for more power. Another goal for the engine was to “optimize dimensions to enhance cornering performance” as well as make the chassis as compact as possible. The frame is all new and has revised geometry, though again no numbers were given. Suspension consists of a Showa Balance Free Fork and Balance Free Rear Cushion shock very similar to those used on the 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R; the fork has external nitrogen-charged oil reservoirs and external damping circuits, and the shock is Showa’s latest iteration of the BFRC and is significantly lighter. Other chassis updates include high-volume intake ducts, a lower top and sleeker design for the fuel tank, and more aerodynamic bodywork. Even the fairing mounting bolts have been redesigned, with a new fl at-top shape to reduce air resistance, with other mounting hardware recessed to prevent turbulence. No mention was made of the new GSX-R’s brakes aside from the use of electronic ABS, but the calipers are very similar to the previous model’s Brembo four-pot monoblock units. The rotors, however, appear to be a variant of Brembo’s T-drive discs, with half the traditional buttons replaced by T-shaped pins. According to Brembo, the assembly system transfers braking force more effectively, is lighter, and has greater resistance to thermo-mechanical stress. A single-valve ride-by-wire throttle assembly replaces the old model’s dual-valve setup, and the electronics package now features a 10-level traction control system, three power modes, a quickshifter that works on upshifts as well as downshifts, and launch control. The press material contains no mention of an IMU as part of the electronics package; in this regard the GSX-R may be a step behind the YZF-R1 and new ZX-10R, but this is one aspect that could very well change before the bike reaches production. No word was given on price or availability for the new model, but with race teams the world over clamoring for the updated platform, it’s a safe bet the new bike will be a very-early-release 2017 model.
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
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