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Kalmar DRF-Series

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Kalmar DRF-Series - information: Kalmar DRF-Series is a very good car, that was released by "Kalmar" company. We collected the best 5 photos of Kalmar DRF-Series on this page.

Brand Name Kalmar
Model Kalmar DRF-Series
Number of views 106806 views
Model's Rate 8.3 out of 10
Number of images 5 images
Interesting News
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • Updates: Honda CBR 150R and 250R.

    Honda seem to be on the upswing with their updates too and this time it’s their two small-capacity sports bikes that have received cosmetic upgrades. To begin with, the Honda CBR 150R is now available with attractive and sporty graphics. HMSI have priced it at Rs 1.23 lakh (ex-Delhi). Along with the CBR 150R, Honda have also updated their premium offering in the 250-cc category, the CBR 250R. The new 250R now comes with fancy stickers and new colours such as red, black and white. This new CBR is priced at Rs 1.60 lakh (ex-Delhi) for the standard non-ABS variant and at Rs 1.89 lakh (ex-Delhi) for the combined ABS version. Apart from these changes the bikes remain the same as before.
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