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Kurganmashzavod AT-S

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Kurganmashzavod AT-S - information: Kurganmashzavod AT-S is a very good car, that was released by "Kurganmashzavod" company. We collected the best 8 photos of Kurganmashzavod AT-S on this page.

Brand Name Kurganmashzavod
Model Kurganmashzavod AT-S
Number of views 14112 views
Model's Rate 5.5 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • 1290 Super Duke GT.

    The mean-looking 1290 Super Duke GT is actually the 1290 Super Duke in Tour mode. To enable the much too capable 1290 Super Duke to develop long legs, KTM have given it a large-capacity 23-litre tank and a lengthened rear subframe with integral mounts for optional panniers. One can even opt for heated grips, cruise control, adjustable windscreen, LED cornering lights and LED daytime running lights. You’ll get KTM’s Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC), which includes traction control and C-ABS, KTM Ride Mode tech and a quickshifter as standard fare anyway. Not to forget that monster 173-PS LC8 engine and semi-active suspension.
  • Suzuki SX4 S-Cross 1.6 DDiS Automatic.

    Suzuki’s SX4 S-Cross has been around for a couple of years and has earned a quiet following for blending a practical interior with a certain amount of driving flair, all at a reasonable price. What it’s never had, and no Suzuki for the last 22 years has had, is an automatic gearbox allied with a diesel engine, or at least a proper one rather than a continuously variable transmission. This combination accounts for 16 per cent of sales in the compact SUV market, so Suzuki is keen to tap in to that extra revenue stream by launching an automatic gearbox option for the existing diesel engine. The gearbox uses a twin-clutch setup to engage odd or even gears in advance, depending on whether the driver is accelerating or braking, ensuring a smooth and instantaneous shift of the next required gear. In use it operates exactly as you would expect an automatic gearbox to work, although it’s technically an automated manual system - hydraulics control the clutch and gearshift in the background, leaving you with nothing to do but play with the steering wheel mounted paddles, should you wish to take over control yourself. Systems of this nature are often a tad rough, but Suzuki’s version is remarkably smooth. Each gear is selected without fuss, and there’s no clunking through the system as the clutch is engaged. It’s not notably quick, despite the claims of instant shifting, but the short pause between ratios would only be a problem if this SUV was a more sporting proposition. Not that the S-Cross can’t handle bends. It can, and probably better than you have any right to expect, but it’s never particularly involving or rewarding. Allgrip four-wheel-drive is standard on this edition, with the electronic gadgetry splitting the power between each wheel, and allowing you to get further in tricky conditions than a conventional two-wheel-drive SUV will allow you. Driving to the top of Ben Nevis might be beyond it, due to ground clearance issues, but you’ll certainly make it home when the snow starts falling. The extra weight of the gearbox hits economy slightly, with a meagre 1.4mpg drop compared to the manual version, but the end result is a still an impressive 62.8mpg on the combined cycle. And that doesn’t appear to be an entirely unrealistic figure either, with 50+mpg in normal use being easily achievable while on test. There’s no extra weight on the inside, with disappointingly lightweight plastics making up the bland, but inoffensive dashboard. And with a long list of standard equipment included within the price, there’s not a shortage of space for the driver to enjoy all of the functions. The S-Cross feels light and airy inside, at least up front, but it gets a bit tighter for headroom in the rear. The boot is class competitive, swallowing exactly the same 430 litres of luggage as Nissan’s Qashqai, and is similarly comparable to SsangYong’s new Tivoli. The SX4 S-Cross comes loaded with equipment, offers excellent real-world economy and has the extra traction and reassurance afforded by four-wheeldrive. It might not be the most exciting model in the segment, or even the class leader, but it offers excellent value for money in a generally pleasing package.
  • MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV 2.0 MIVEC GX4h.

    Bandwagons have rarely looked as tasty as this. Mitsubishi’s first PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) looked like a confused fish, but now it has design bite and a sparkle in its LED eyes. If it means business, it brings a market report that makes irresistible reading: in the last 12 months, around 39,000 hybrid cars have sold in the UK, a rise of around 7,000 on the previous year. And this is the star of that sales storm, Britain’s number one plug-in hybrid. Not that I initially felt turned on. My car was delivered by an expert called Dave. I gave him a lift to the railway station, but by the time we’d got to the drop-off bay, I began to wish he’d stay. After all, the boot’s quite roomy, even with all those batteries aboard. It wasn’t that Dave was great company (though if you’re reading this, Dave, it was nice to meet you), but just more that the initial prospect of a gear-free gizmo with steering paddles that effectively operate braking, with buttons that allow you to bank energy options, and with more than a Maplin’s worth of electrical socketry… well, let’s just say that as I drove off, I wondered if the handbrake might also cunningly adjust the fridge back at home. I certainly knew how Laika must have felt when those Russians packed her off in Sputnik 2: forget range anxiety, I needed to conquer technology terror first. But unlike a doomed dog I soon began to relax. Within two days, I was a first-class ecoheaded guru, mentally kerchinging full-on B5 regeneration mode on a 1:10 slope, tutting knowingly at the elastic nature of what is forecast to be a mile of battery juice (in the Outer Cotswolds, it can be mere furlongs) and laughing sarcastically at the difference between a functioning charge point and the sort supermarkets brag about (thanks, Sainsbury’s) which, when driven to, “don’t work and never have, mate, not since it was installed on day one’. Mitsubishi won’t tell you, but this car also comes with an anorak as standard. You think you'll not need it, but you’ll soon be zipped in snugly. The reason? E-driving is addictive. Think about it: rationally, it’s the last avenue of motoring pleasure open to any sane driver out there. Drive wisely, zap regularly (from home at about 50p a pop) and a brave new world of fiscal freedom beckons. Before you know it, you’re a moth to that elusive candle of perpetual motion. Be warned though: egg-shell throttling and B5-level regeneration spells inordinate use of the brake lights, which now kick in because, as Dave told me, regeneration has the same net effect as steady braking. Could this spell expensive dentistry for BMW drivers, I ask Dave. We agreed that, all told, we must make sure that the planet comes first. Shunt stress aside, the PHEV soon proves to be as much fun with batteries as anything roadgoing. For me, at least. Five hundred miles in, I show my wife we’re achieving the kind of mpg fossil fuellists can only dream about. Yes, she says, but driving at 29mph might not always be practical. And those other drivers… maybe that’s not friendly waving? She takes the car to work though, and while I haven’t monitored her journey GCHQstyle (it may well be a Bluetooth option), I snoop on her data and see she’s been wearing that anorak as well. Not that the PHEV’s incapable of driving like you forgot to turn the chip pan off. In a few hundred yards of thoughtless abandon, I floored it to see how it liked a bit of action. It was, as they say, up for it, though that two tonnes of bodyweight did make me think of a Labrador suffering from greyhound delusions. Still, I’m not sure Mitsubishi’s seeking product placement in the next Bond movie, so maybe it's a moot point. A snap verdict? I love it. It’s early days, but my PHEV’s got my expectations on maximum charge.
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