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Lada 1200 Combi

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Lada 1200 Combi - information: Lada 1200 Combi is a very good car, that was released by "Lada" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Lada 1200 Combi on this page.

Brand Name Lada
Model Lada 1200 Combi
Number of views 79995 views
Model's Rate 5.8 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • DUCATI MULTISTRADAS.

    When I had a chance to try out the Ducati Multistrada Pikes Peak last year I was incredibly impressed, the concept of four bikes in one is bandied about quite commonly when referring to the Multistrada and is a good reflection of the bike’s abilties. The current Multistrada is a large bike with a wet weight of 235kg - relatively light all things considered. I found the seat height tall, although it is adjustable between 825 and 845mm and couldn’t get both feet flat to the ground, but balance and low speed maneuvering were both very good. Heated grips of a chilly morning are priceless and the centre-stand is a nice touch, although probably not for everyone. They are part of the Touring pack which includes heated grips, panniers and center-stand. The Multistrada S benefits from the Ducati Skyhook Suspension and also includes a few nifty additional features like full LED headlamps, including the Ducati Cornering Lights (DCL). The braking systems on the S is also an upgraded Superbike spec system, with M50 Brembo front calipers on 330mm rotors, with a dual piston Brembo rear caliper on 265mm rotor. Also standard is the Ducati Multimedia System, which uses Bluetooth to accept incoming calls, alert you to messages and control your music, when synced with your other devices, displayed via the S’s full colour TFT display. On the bike, performance from the DVT Testastretta starts low and tractor-like, with strong but controllable low end-torque, and between 4000 and 5000rpm transforms into sportsbike like drive - in fact if you want to move off in a hurry try opening that throttle wide open, it’s exhilarating. Just keep the revs up past 4000rpm where it transitions into much smoother running, with slight vibes felt through the ‘bars, but not in an annoying fashion - you’ll have all the torque you could wish for, for rapid overtaking or acceleration. You can also modify each of the riding modes for a variety of settings, where I was using the baseline settings, which means you can have each mode set up for specific conditions, whether that’s suspension, power delivery, ABS, DTC or DWC. The Skyhook Suspension was a standout and in Sport mode with one helmet (the one rider, no luggage setting) I could feel the forks providing more support during heavy braking, only to soften as I came to a stop. Through the local twisties the Skyhook suspension proved itself, with an ability to easily absorb road irregularities. Coming into corners needs more effort than your regular sportsbike, with the Multistrada obviously carrying its weight taller and taking more input to follow your chosen path. It wasn’t the sharpest on tip in, with the standard settings - but that’s something you can tweak thanks to the level of adjustability on offer. The taller bike also means you’re leaning over further, which was easy and confidence inspiring but lends itself to coming into your corners nice and wide.You can feel that you’re relying on a system of suspension that essentially has a mind of its own but as you get used to that fact and show more confidence in the bike it only gets better and better. Part of what sets the newest Skyhook Suspension (DSS) system apart is the Evo suffix, with the previous sensors now joined by the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which is used to provide cornering ABS to the Brembo braking system with Bosch 9ME ABS unit. This means the DSS Evo system is able to take into account your lean angle when calculating the ideal suspension response. It’s high tech and the results on the road speak for themselves. I was hoping to take my wife for a ride as a pillion to get an opinion on riding two-up, but with all my testing mid-week unfortunately couldn’t make it happen. Now it’s quite possibly you’re thinking to yourself, why spend the extra $4000 on the S model, which is a fair question. The S is the obvious choice though, as the Multistrada truly is many bikes in one, with the S offering the ultimate in suspension adjustability at the click of a few buttons. It’s the future of motorcycling and Ducati’s leading the charge.
  • TOYOTA LAND CRUISER INVINCIBLE 2.8 D-4D AUTOMATIC.

    When you’ve got a vehicle in your lineup as legendary as the Land Cruiser, the key to success is continuous evolution. Small improvements dotted throughout the model’s life will ensure that you have something new for customers that change their car regularly. This approach, Toyota has got down to a fine art, with the latest car benefiting from a brand new 174bhp 2.8-litre D-4D engine and six-speed automatic transmission that meets the latest Euro-6 emissions regulations. Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are both improved - up by 3.3mpg and down by 19g/km, respectively - but power and torque figures are disappointingly less than before. But despite the power cut, the on-road driving experience is enhanced compared to before. Performance is adequate, and while the engine is chattery from cold, it settles down a fair bit when warmed through. You’ll still hear it, especially when you floor the throttle, but at motorway speeds it settles down to a low roar, while road and wind noise are kept reasonably well in check. There’s a vagueness to the steering, however, cornering prowess is pretty good, with low levels of lean through bends, and generous amounts of grip. A choice of ‘comfort’ or ‘sport’ modes for the suspension means that things get too bouncy and wallowy in the former setting, but nicely firmed up in the latter, with all but the deepest of potholes and severest of undulations soaked up well, making the Sport mode the setting of choice for us. Off road, show the Land Cruiser a muddy field or a heavily rutted track and it’ll eat it up and spit it out - its mug plugging prowess far exceeds its ability on the road. The interior of the Land Cruiser has been steadily improved over time, with better and better materials used along the way. The majority of the plastics are of the soft-touch variety and all of the fixtures and fittings feel like they’ve been screwed together nicely and will stand up to a lifetime’s worth of abuse. The wood trim seems outdated to us, while the steering wheel would be better if it was covered entirely in leather, rather than having the slippery feel of the wood. Controls for the four-wheel-drive system dominate the centre console, with all of the buttons logically arranged up high on the dashboard. The navigation screen is ideally placed and easy to use, with clear and colourful graphics. Visibility is generally good all around the car thanks to its square shape and good sized windows, though the rear wiper is next to useless due to the small area that it wipes. Park it in tight spaces and you’ll curse the side opening tailgate, and wish that it had a more conventional up and over arrangement. The space available is also smaller than most rivals, despite the vehicle’s obvious bulk. Oddment space is well catered for thanks to a large cubby hole underneath the armrest, decently sized door pockets and glovebox, and a pair of cupholders. Even with a sunroof fitted, headroom is pretty good both front and rear, and back seat passengers will be impressed by the amount of knee room. The usual caveats apply when it comes to using the sixth and seventh seat in the back, with passengers likely to want the journey to be as short as possible, unless they’re a youngster.
  • Audi’s electrified future.

    The introduction of mild hybrids to Audi’s model range is set to edge efficiency ever closer to the kind of economy figures enjoyed by TDI owners. But it doesn’t mean the death of the diesel engine, as the introduction of cutting edge technology can be paired to both TDI diesel and TFSI petrol engines. Audi says that within ten years, its entire model range will feature the technology. The key elements of the new system are an 11 Ah capacity lithium-ion battery pack and belt starter generator, with the latter replacing the current starter motor. Coasting becomes possible from around 9mph upwards, so that if the driver takes their foot off the accelerator, the car will coast along for a short time with the engine off, saving fuel. It’s possible to recuperate up to 5kW (7bhp), with the generator returning that power, reducing fuel usage and boosting economy as a result. And while this system can be integrated into current 12-volt systems, Audi is on the verge of announcing that it will put a new 48-volt system into production, with a capacity of harnessing 12kW (16bhp), that will allow coasting for up to 30 seconds, delivering even better efficiency compared to the 12-volt system. The company first gave a glimpse at the technology in the Prologue Concept car last year at the Los Angeles motor show. Other benefits of the introduction of a 48-volt electrical system includes the ability to have much smaller cable cross sections, reducing the weight of the wiring harness, and because it has four times the power, there’s opportunities to add additional innovative technology for the suspension and drivetrain. Further into the future, Audi’s engineers plan to convert the auxiliary systems, like pumps, superchargers for the engine, transmission and air conditioning system to 48 volts. Today these are driven hydraulically or by the engine, but in the future they will be powered by electricity and lighter and more compact. Audi will soon announce an electromechanical active roll stabilisation system, which features an electric motor and a three-stage planetary gearbox that separates the two halves of the stabiliser from each other. For relaxed and comfortable driving, the two halves are decoupled, resulting in cossetting ride comfort. For the sportier driver, the tubes are interconnected and twist against each other, delivering a tauter, more dynamic ride, and less roll when cornering. The front and rear stabilisers can also be adjusted independently allowing even greater degrees of fine tuning. The system is also capable of harnessing energy, and the motor can act as a generator, converting it to electrical energy. But Audi’s engineers are already looking at a second, more advanced project using the 48-volt setup, though it is still in the very early prototype stage. Being developed under the working title of eROT, an electromechanical rotary damper replaces today’s hydraulic item. The system isn’t too far apart from the active roll stabilisation arrangement in terms of basic principles, but a strong lever arm absorbs all of the forces that occur on a bumpy road, and via a series of gears, the force is transmitted into an electric motor, which then converts it to electricity. Recuperation is, on average, around 150 watts on an average road, with a freshly resurfaced road generating as little as 3 watts, while a badly maintained country lane may generate as much as 613 watts. Over a cross section of different roads, CO2 emissions savings could be as much as 3g/ km or four to five mpg.
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