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Laffly ABL6 Metz

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Laffly ABL6 Metz - information: Laffly ABL6 Metz is a very good car, that was released by "Laffly" company. We collected the best 4 photos of Laffly ABL6 Metz on this page.

Brand Name Laffly
Model Laffly ABL6 Metz
Number of views 71216 views
Model's Rate 8.6 out of 10
Number of images 4 images
Interesting News
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
  • TOYOTA LAND CRUISER INVINCIBLE 2.8 D-4D AUTOMATIC.

    When you’ve got a vehicle in your lineup as legendary as the Land Cruiser, the key to success is continuous evolution. Small improvements dotted throughout the model’s life will ensure that you have something new for customers that change their car regularly. This approach, Toyota has got down to a fine art, with the latest car benefiting from a brand new 174bhp 2.8-litre D-4D engine and six-speed automatic transmission that meets the latest Euro-6 emissions regulations. Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are both improved - up by 3.3mpg and down by 19g/km, respectively - but power and torque figures are disappointingly less than before. But despite the power cut, the on-road driving experience is enhanced compared to before. Performance is adequate, and while the engine is chattery from cold, it settles down a fair bit when warmed through. You’ll still hear it, especially when you floor the throttle, but at motorway speeds it settles down to a low roar, while road and wind noise are kept reasonably well in check. There’s a vagueness to the steering, however, cornering prowess is pretty good, with low levels of lean through bends, and generous amounts of grip. A choice of ‘comfort’ or ‘sport’ modes for the suspension means that things get too bouncy and wallowy in the former setting, but nicely firmed up in the latter, with all but the deepest of potholes and severest of undulations soaked up well, making the Sport mode the setting of choice for us. Off road, show the Land Cruiser a muddy field or a heavily rutted track and it’ll eat it up and spit it out - its mug plugging prowess far exceeds its ability on the road. The interior of the Land Cruiser has been steadily improved over time, with better and better materials used along the way. The majority of the plastics are of the soft-touch variety and all of the fixtures and fittings feel like they’ve been screwed together nicely and will stand up to a lifetime’s worth of abuse. The wood trim seems outdated to us, while the steering wheel would be better if it was covered entirely in leather, rather than having the slippery feel of the wood. Controls for the four-wheel-drive system dominate the centre console, with all of the buttons logically arranged up high on the dashboard. The navigation screen is ideally placed and easy to use, with clear and colourful graphics. Visibility is generally good all around the car thanks to its square shape and good sized windows, though the rear wiper is next to useless due to the small area that it wipes. Park it in tight spaces and you’ll curse the side opening tailgate, and wish that it had a more conventional up and over arrangement. The space available is also smaller than most rivals, despite the vehicle’s obvious bulk. Oddment space is well catered for thanks to a large cubby hole underneath the armrest, decently sized door pockets and glovebox, and a pair of cupholders. Even with a sunroof fitted, headroom is pretty good both front and rear, and back seat passengers will be impressed by the amount of knee room. The usual caveats apply when it comes to using the sixth and seventh seat in the back, with passengers likely to want the journey to be as short as possible, unless they’re a youngster.
  • NORTON FLAT TRACK.

    This modern Norton dirt track custom is the work of Jamie Ireson’s 72Motorcycles, in collaboration with Norton Motorcycles - a tribute to the 1970s RonWood racing machine that won three Ascot track championship titles and was taken to a National dirt track victory by Alex Jorgenson. Based on a newCommando 961, it was recently launched at Motorcycle Live on the official NortonMotorcycles stand as the first of a limited edition run of 12. Ireson said: “The project started whenmy partnerMerryMichau photographed the 2014 Norton brochure. She toldNorton CEO Stuart Garner that I build custombikes and it went from there. Stuart asked us to come up with some ideas and it turned out that we had the same thoughts on building a custombike based on RonWood’s dirt tracker. Ireson is a design engineer by trade and used his experience gained in the automotive industry to model the bike in CAD before committing to metal. “The one thing we needed to do was lower the bike, and working in CAD with models that Norton supplied allowedme to see what effect that had.” That was November 2014 but it took until June 2015 for the project to take off. “Norton sent me a rolling chassis and engine unit with the only stipulation being that the bike had to be ready forMotorcycle Live at the NEC,” says Jamie. The engine and transmission are standard 961, as is the main frame, but Jamie modified the rear end. He says: “The RonWood bike has a really small oil tank, because it’s designed to only do a small number of laps. I cut off the end off the original tank, made up some bends on a CNCmachine and got themwelded up to follow the lines of Ron Wood’s [oil-carrying] frame.” According to Jamie, the standard Norton chassis geometry is slap bang in the middle of what is considered an ideal flat track set-up, but this build had to retain the standard 17in wheels. The swingarm is also standard, but with added bracing. The standard Ohlins forks were too long so Jamie opted for shorter, larger-diameter 58mm Ducati Panigale forks which slot into new yokes made from Jamie’s CAD drawings by Fastec Racing in Suffolk, who also did machining work on footpeg mounts and the velocity stacks. Jamie produced a buck for the tank, from which Parker Fabrication in Bournemouth produced the alloy tank. “The inspiration of the Ron Wood bike was the gorgeous red paintwork and tank graphics. We talked with out painters, Image Design, about giving it a modern twist, but they said it was so good we should leave it. The only change is using the current Norton logo.” The engine is standard, but Jamie’s removed the original airbox, so: “we might pick up anything between five and 10bhp.” The exhaust follows the same lines as the Ron Wood bike. It’s all custom made and hand-rolled by Tom at Foundry Motorcycles. The pipes have been given a super hard-wearing ceramic-coated black by Wes at Hi-Spec Coatings in West Sussex. Lasertech Engineering did all the frame welding. The Norton 961 MM Flat Track is priced at ?30,000. “All 12 will be identical except for the number,” says Jamie. “We’ve got 44. We’re keeping this original bike. Customers can have any number, but we won’t use one number twice.”
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