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Lambretta LD

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Lambretta LD - information: Lambretta LD is a very good car, that was released by "Lambretta" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Lambretta LD on this page.

Brand Name Lambretta
Model Lambretta LD
Number of views 48966 views
Model's Rate 6.4 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • Speed Triple.

    We’ve all seen the videos of the new Speed Triple, we also got to see the bike in the flesh at EICMA 2015. Although the basic cycle parts remain mostly unchanged, the bike now features a brand-new 1,050-cc in-line triple with a new combustion chamber, new piston design, new cylinder-head and a new machined crankshaft. Triumph have also added ride-by-wire technology, a smaller and more efficient radiator, a slipper clutch and a free-flowing exhaust with 70 per cent better flow rate into the mix. The new Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R also feature a suite of rider-focused technology. Among the features that add to the Speed Triple’s performance and capability are a new ECU coupled to a new adjustable ride-by-wire throttle with selectable throttle maps that increase the feel, responsiveness and control. There are now five distinct riding modes to choose from: Road, Rain, Sport, Track and a new Rider Configurable mode, that allows the rider to set up the motorcycle to the optimum performance relative to road conditions or environment.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
  • Audi’s electrified future.

    The introduction of mild hybrids to Audi’s model range is set to edge efficiency ever closer to the kind of economy figures enjoyed by TDI owners. But it doesn’t mean the death of the diesel engine, as the introduction of cutting edge technology can be paired to both TDI diesel and TFSI petrol engines. Audi says that within ten years, its entire model range will feature the technology. The key elements of the new system are an 11 Ah capacity lithium-ion battery pack and belt starter generator, with the latter replacing the current starter motor. Coasting becomes possible from around 9mph upwards, so that if the driver takes their foot off the accelerator, the car will coast along for a short time with the engine off, saving fuel. It’s possible to recuperate up to 5kW (7bhp), with the generator returning that power, reducing fuel usage and boosting economy as a result. And while this system can be integrated into current 12-volt systems, Audi is on the verge of announcing that it will put a new 48-volt system into production, with a capacity of harnessing 12kW (16bhp), that will allow coasting for up to 30 seconds, delivering even better efficiency compared to the 12-volt system. The company first gave a glimpse at the technology in the Prologue Concept car last year at the Los Angeles motor show. Other benefits of the introduction of a 48-volt electrical system includes the ability to have much smaller cable cross sections, reducing the weight of the wiring harness, and because it has four times the power, there’s opportunities to add additional innovative technology for the suspension and drivetrain. Further into the future, Audi’s engineers plan to convert the auxiliary systems, like pumps, superchargers for the engine, transmission and air conditioning system to 48 volts. Today these are driven hydraulically or by the engine, but in the future they will be powered by electricity and lighter and more compact. Audi will soon announce an electromechanical active roll stabilisation system, which features an electric motor and a three-stage planetary gearbox that separates the two halves of the stabiliser from each other. For relaxed and comfortable driving, the two halves are decoupled, resulting in cossetting ride comfort. For the sportier driver, the tubes are interconnected and twist against each other, delivering a tauter, more dynamic ride, and less roll when cornering. The front and rear stabilisers can also be adjusted independently allowing even greater degrees of fine tuning. The system is also capable of harnessing energy, and the motor can act as a generator, converting it to electrical energy. But Audi’s engineers are already looking at a second, more advanced project using the 48-volt setup, though it is still in the very early prototype stage. Being developed under the working title of eROT, an electromechanical rotary damper replaces today’s hydraulic item. The system isn’t too far apart from the active roll stabilisation arrangement in terms of basic principles, but a strong lever arm absorbs all of the forces that occur on a bumpy road, and via a series of gears, the force is transmitted into an electric motor, which then converts it to electricity. Recuperation is, on average, around 150 watts on an average road, with a freshly resurfaced road generating as little as 3 watts, while a badly maintained country lane may generate as much as 613 watts. Over a cross section of different roads, CO2 emissions savings could be as much as 3g/ km or four to five mpg.
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