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Lazareth YZF 1000 R1 Street Bike

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Lazareth YZF 1000 R1 Street Bike - information: Lazareth YZF 1000 R1 Street Bike is a very good car, that was released by "Lazareth" company. We collected the best 6 photos of Lazareth YZF 1000 R1 Street Bike on this page.

Brand Name Lazareth
Model Lazareth YZF 1000 R1 Street Bike
Number of views 11113 views
Model's Rate 8.7 out of 10
Number of images 6 images
Interesting News
  • Audi’s electrified future.

    The introduction of mild hybrids to Audi’s model range is set to edge efficiency ever closer to the kind of economy figures enjoyed by TDI owners. But it doesn’t mean the death of the diesel engine, as the introduction of cutting edge technology can be paired to both TDI diesel and TFSI petrol engines. Audi says that within ten years, its entire model range will feature the technology. The key elements of the new system are an 11 Ah capacity lithium-ion battery pack and belt starter generator, with the latter replacing the current starter motor. Coasting becomes possible from around 9mph upwards, so that if the driver takes their foot off the accelerator, the car will coast along for a short time with the engine off, saving fuel. It’s possible to recuperate up to 5kW (7bhp), with the generator returning that power, reducing fuel usage and boosting economy as a result. And while this system can be integrated into current 12-volt systems, Audi is on the verge of announcing that it will put a new 48-volt system into production, with a capacity of harnessing 12kW (16bhp), that will allow coasting for up to 30 seconds, delivering even better efficiency compared to the 12-volt system. The company first gave a glimpse at the technology in the Prologue Concept car last year at the Los Angeles motor show. Other benefits of the introduction of a 48-volt electrical system includes the ability to have much smaller cable cross sections, reducing the weight of the wiring harness, and because it has four times the power, there’s opportunities to add additional innovative technology for the suspension and drivetrain. Further into the future, Audi’s engineers plan to convert the auxiliary systems, like pumps, superchargers for the engine, transmission and air conditioning system to 48 volts. Today these are driven hydraulically or by the engine, but in the future they will be powered by electricity and lighter and more compact. Audi will soon announce an electromechanical active roll stabilisation system, which features an electric motor and a three-stage planetary gearbox that separates the two halves of the stabiliser from each other. For relaxed and comfortable driving, the two halves are decoupled, resulting in cossetting ride comfort. For the sportier driver, the tubes are interconnected and twist against each other, delivering a tauter, more dynamic ride, and less roll when cornering. The front and rear stabilisers can also be adjusted independently allowing even greater degrees of fine tuning. The system is also capable of harnessing energy, and the motor can act as a generator, converting it to electrical energy. But Audi’s engineers are already looking at a second, more advanced project using the 48-volt setup, though it is still in the very early prototype stage. Being developed under the working title of eROT, an electromechanical rotary damper replaces today’s hydraulic item. The system isn’t too far apart from the active roll stabilisation arrangement in terms of basic principles, but a strong lever arm absorbs all of the forces that occur on a bumpy road, and via a series of gears, the force is transmitted into an electric motor, which then converts it to electricity. Recuperation is, on average, around 150 watts on an average road, with a freshly resurfaced road generating as little as 3 watts, while a badly maintained country lane may generate as much as 613 watts. Over a cross section of different roads, CO2 emissions savings could be as much as 3g/ km or four to five mpg.
  • DUCATI DIAVEL RED.

    Got issues? Anger management, racing crouch Tourette’s, grumpier as the days pass? Perhaps Ducati have the panacea for those ills and others in the form of the Diavel. The hulking, fat and stretched alleged cruiser from Bologna is much more than a parts bin Frankenstein. Hang on to what’s left of your soul because this devil is captivating enough to be almost anyone’s Faustian bargain. Why? Be comforted by the beckoning seat that embraces your buttocks delightfully and holds you low and squarely in genuine comfort. Find your new foot position. Fire up the Testastretta 11° engine, which was surely made in heaven and roll along on the sled-like long wheelbase chassis, monster brakes and ultra-fat rear hoop. Look mean. Sound mean. Be mean. Or be a show pony, as it matters not - the Diavel will not be fazed. I was sceptical at first, but I’m now a wild-eyed disciple. How? Let the magnificent engine do the work. From the bottom rung of the ladder to the top, it does not cease providing chunky, wieldy torque and still thirsts to be spun up - a gem of an engine that is aided with sublime fuelling and excellent throttle reaction. Diavel weight distribution, which is lardy for a duck, and a lengthy wheelbase ensures stability is a priority, however, the ergonomics and ‘bars assist in defying physics with surprisingly relaxed direction changes. Top shelf suspension is well suited, enhancing the solid geometry and includes on-the-fly rear adjustment. Stopping is a non-issue, the superbike specification brakes are truly splendid, offering a deftness of touch that is inspiring. Styling is debatable I reckon, but your call, and who cares when you can bank over enough to scrape your boots in hateful salute to the authorities and all the while the beast begs for more? Just change your style from hard braking late into bends and body slamming the bike down, to increasing the radii and rolling around that big back tyre. The demeanour of the bike, like Beelzebub himself, is misleading as it appeases the senses, relaxes and makes you chill, but will get you maniacal from the pleasures. It is definitely a faster point to point machine than it might appear. The technology, love or hate it, is there in spades and includes ride-by-wire throttle, several electronic safety systems, multi-modes to corral the Testastretta wallop and dual displays for God knows why. A mortal sin is the keyless ignition - a nonsense. Another is machine width, which kind of made it impossible to efficiently lane split. The Diavel is a new, perhaps controversial, branch on Ducati’s evolutionary tree, but a significant one. The non-compromising approach by the designers and engineers has made a sophisticated and capable machine that needs to be ridden to be properly appreciated. It will not be to everyone’s liking, but the lure of the dark side, which is now available in traditional red for the Australian market, may be the elixir for many evils. God bless the Diavel?
  • Honda CB Shine SP.

    This month seems to be a special one for Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India (HMSI) Limited as the company has rolled out a brand-new variant of their best-selling motorcycle, the CB Shine, called the CB Shine SP. The prices for this new variant start at Rs 59,990 (ex-Delhi) and go all the way up to Rs 64,400 (ex-Delhi) for the topend variant. There are changes galore on this new variant which now gets better-looking body panels, stickers and a new paint job. The biggest change, however, lies within the engine. Honda have equipped the bike with a five-speed gearbox which once served the CB Stunner. Read more about the addition of one more cog in our road test review of the SP.
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