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LeTourneau Model 4592

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LeTourneau Model 4592 - information: LeTourneau Model 4592 is a very good car, that was released by "LeTourneau" company. We collected the best 8 photos of LeTourneau Model 4592 on this page.

Brand Name LeTourneau
Model LeTourneau Model 4592
Number of views 58536 views
Model's Rate 8.7 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • Jaguar XJ.

    It’s fair to say that the new Jaguar XE and XF have been soaking up most of the coverage about Jaguar of late, not to mention the upcoming F-Pace, set to arrive in showrooms next year. And then there’s been the Bond connection, with 007 behind the wheel of the stunning C-X75 supercar, which though once mooted for production, won’t now be built. With so much going on, it’s little surprise that the announcement of a revised XJ fell below the radar, with the first examples arriving in showrooms just about now. It’s remarkable to think that the F-Type is now Jaguar’s oldest car in its line-up, having only been launched in 2012, and arriving in showrooms during 2013. It’s a far cry from Jaguar’s line-up just a few years ago when most of the models seemed quite elderly. It’s been the hefty cash injection from Jaguar’s owners, Tata Motors, that has made the difference, ever since it bought the firm alongside Land Rover back in 2008. In excess of Ј11 billion has been invested over the past seven years, which has resulted in the transformation that we see today. And while Jaguar’s sales performance hasn’t quite lived up to the spectacular results that the Land Rover range has seen, last month’s increase in sales of 93 per cent compared to a year ago is predicted to be just the start. Much of Jaguar’s hopes are being pinned on the upcoming F-Pace crossover vehicle, though this updated XJ is set to make a small, but significant contribution thanks to important gains in the chauffeur market. Jaguar executives have been wooing big names in the professional end of the market, and it’ll mean that you’ll see more long- wheelbase XJs on the outside of the motorway instead of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The headline change in the latest XJ, apart from some modest styling changes, is the introduction of a new Euro-6 compliant 3.0- litre V6 diesel engine that develops 296bhp and a mighty 516lb ft of torque. That’s a rather useful 25bhp up on the outgoing model, not to mention the 73lb ft of torque. And yet, both CO2 emissions and fuel economy figures are improved over the previous edition, with this standard wheelbase R-Sport edition emitting 155g/km of CO2 and capable of 47.9mpg on the combined cycle. Less sporty editions manage 149g/km and 49.6mpg, an enhancement compared to the 159g/km and 46.3mpg possible on the earlier model. And this time around there’s no penalty for choosing the long-wheelbase edition, with fuel economy and CO2 emissions remaining the same. But with the vital statistics out of the way, it’s time to talk about some of the changes made to the car. New full-LED lights give the latest XJ a more distinctive quad-lighting signature at night, while a prominent, upright front grille gives a much more muscular, imposing stance. At the rear, LED technology is used to great effect to deliver a J-shape signature for the tail lights, flanked by revised bumpers, a gloss black valence and a chrome insert. A totally new, superfast infotainment system totally transforms the connectivity of the latest XJ, finally putting to rest the limitations and clunkiness of the old audio and navigation system. And finally, the model range has been revised to add a dynamic R-Sport edition, as tested here, as well as a flagship Autobiography model paired to the long-wheelbase body that elevates the XJ range past the Ј80k barrier. The cabin of the latest XJ is as special as ever. The materials are sumptuous, swathed in leather, and the wrap-around effect of the dashboard delivers a cosy, encapsulating feel. Piano black surfaces deliver a modern, sporty look, while the heavily bolstered chairs hold you in place nicely along demanding stretches of road. The air vents wouldn’t be out of place in a Rolls-Royce, giving the impression that nothing has been spared in the search for ultimate luxury. Generous adjustment to the front chairs means that you can get a really comfortable driving position, though the front seats don’t go low enough to stop the heads of taller drivers from brushing the headlining when the optional sunroof is fitted. Move to the back, and there’s a generous amount of knee and leg space and rear passengers don’t seem to suffer from headroom limitations like those in the front do. The sizeable transmission tunnel running through the centre of the car means that the XJ is best suited to two passengers sat in the back. In common with the XF, there’s theatrics in store when the car is started up, with the rotary gear selector rising up from the centre console. It’s a feature that you never tire of and adds to the special feel that every XJ delivers. Accelerate off the line and the latest 296bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine catapults you along the road faster than its predecessor. It may only be 0.2 of a second faster to 62mph, but responsiveness is improved nonetheless, no doubt helped by the extra torque on tap. It’s impressively refined at all speeds, yet delivers a pleasing growl when you bury the accelerator pedal into the bulkhead. Despite being more than five metres long, agility through tricky corners is impressive, with excellent grip and reassuringly flat handling. The steering has a pleasing weight to it, and is highly satisfying when being piloted through a challenging set of bends. It’s really good fun for such a big car, yet is utterly manoeuvrable in a city setting. The suspension of this R-Sport model errs on the firm side, no doubt, and will appeal to owners that prefer a more dynamic driving experience. A short drive of the Autobiography model rounded off the sharper edges nicely, delivering a smoother ride at all road speeds.
  • China the key to Avista’s future.

    THE future of Buick’s gorgeous Avista concept - and a Holdenbadged version - lies in two extra doors, according to General Motors insiders Wheels spoke to following the car’s Detroit motor show debut. Sources confirmed that a model of a four-door version exists in the GM styling studio and is under serious consideration following its overwhelmingly positive reaction as the star of the show. GM has started work on making a business case for building the car, and a Holden-badged version - including a higher-output HSV model - could be in the mix. GM sources hint the production Avista would likely end up being a four-door coupe designed as a more affordable rival to the Mercedes-Benz CLS, BMW 6 Series Gran Coupe and Audi A7 Sportback. While Buick last year showed off a four-door concept - the Australian-designed Avenir - the four-door Avista coupe would be smaller and sleeker, with more emphasis on proportions and design than rear seat space. The challenge for securing an Avista business case is ensuring enough global demand, and once again right-hand drive production is the big question mark. In the global automotive game, Buick (which sells only in China and North America) tends to fly under the radar. But with sales of 1.25 million vehicles last year - the highest in Buick’s 112 years - it is GM’s second best-selling brand worldwide after Chevrolet. Put that down to China, where it’s the country’s number two brand. China accounts for about 80 percent of total Buick sales, and therefore holds the key to any decision to produce Avista. Although Chinese consumers do not currently buy coupes in significant numbers, Buick and GMC vice-president Duncan Aldred doesn’t necessarily see that as a roadblock to Avista getting the green light for production. “I think we’ve earned the right to have the halo car in the Buick range,” Aldred says. “We’re the premium mainstream brand in China, and there’s great value in us continuing to stretch the brand upwards, even though it may not be massive volume.” “China is important to any Buick,” admits GM design chief Ed Welburn, who says GM’s Chinese product planners have seen the car. While China is now a massive SUV market, Welburn makes the point that Chinese consumers suddenly switched from buying sedans three years ago. “A coupe might be the next big thing.” The Avista concept is based on a mash-up of GM Alpha and Omega components, sharing the Alpha-based Chevrolet Camaro coupe’s 2811mm wheelbase and with nearly identical front and rear tracks. Under the bonnet is a 3.0-litre V6 driving the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. It’s the same engine used in the Cadillac CT6. “It’s buildable,” says Cadillac chief engineer Dave Leone. “The business case is the issue.” What helps the business case is that the production version would be built using GM’s Alpha architecture, which underpins Cadillac’s ATS and CTS as well as Camaro. Alpha means the car would not only share components that are already produced in volume, but a number of different variants of the car could also easily be configured. The Avista’s engine bay, for example, will accept GM’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four, and while the 6.2-litre V8 can also be fitted into Alpha, sources say the Avista’s underbonnet layout has not been protected for the larger engine. The eight-speed auto can be swapped for a six-speed manual, and it can be built with all-wheel drive as well as rear-drive. Importantly, it can be built in right-hand drive. That means GM could easily build Opel, Vauxhall and Holden versions of the car, offering powertrains that suit each market, along with different equipment levels and different chassis set-ups. “Think of all the performance hardware in the parts bin,” teases Welburn. An HSV Avista with all-wheel drive and the 346kW, twin-turbo 3.6-litre V6 from the Cadillac ATS-V? It’s possible. “That’s just a good business model,” says Aldred of selling Avista as an Opel. “If you can build a vehicle that’s competing in Europe, North America and China, you’ve pretty much got it covered.” And what about Holden? “Holden’s in the mix,” confirms Aldred, a Brit who was managing director of Vauxhall before taking on the Buick/GMC job, so knows GM’s Australian subsidiary well. “We could do right-hand drive. That investment’s done, though there is an additional expense. I guess you’ve gotta see if there is enough volume in the UK with Vauxhall.” Avista has a lot of enthusiastic supporters inside GM. “It’s gorgeous,” gushed GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “I said to Mark [Reuss], ‘We have to find a way of doing this one’.” Lower sales expectations and premium margins mean a fourdoor coupe is perhaps a safer choice as a Buick halo car than a large sedan like the Avenir, which would have had to compete with everything from an S-Class Benz to Hyundai’s new Genesis G90. Even so, GM product planners are wary of committing investment dollars to this notoriously fickle segment. And that’s why there’s a strong faction inside GM that wants to stretch Avista’s wheelbase slightly and add a couple of doors.
  • Modern throwback.

    This is the XSR900. And yes, you’re right - it’s the charismatic three-cylinder MT-09 wearing it’s dad’s flares and floppy-collared shirt. Chassis and engine are MT-09, with the 2016 updates of a slipper-assist light-action clutch and three-level traction control. For the XSR the MT’s contemporary styling is swapped for round lights, aluminium bodywork and round instruments. ‘To reflect Yamaha’s sporty DNA, its history and its iconic motorcycles of the past,’ they say. Hmm. Don’t know about all that, but the 900 pulls it off. You could predict the XSR. After retrofying the MT-07 into the XSR700 (see last issue) this larger ‘Faster Sons’ variant was a given, especially after Yamaha’s video of the ‘Faster Wasp’ MT-09 flattracker by US custom bloke Roland Sands. Let’s hope the trim on the front of his tank makes the accessory list, to give the same flat-tank profile. In other MT-related news, there’s now an MT-03. Basically a naked YZF-R3 sportsbike for A2 licence holders, with funky digi dash, LED lights and crisp lines, it’s not quite a modern LC... but looks good.
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