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Leyland DAF 400

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Leyland DAF 400 - information: Leyland DAF 400 is a very good car, that was released by "Leyland DAF" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Leyland DAF 400 on this page.

Brand Name Leyland DAF
Model Leyland DAF 400
Number of views 72629 views
Model's Rate 5.3 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Citroen e-mehari ReVealed.

    Following the unveiling of the Cactus-M concept at the Frankfurt motor show last September, harking back to the original Mйhari from 1968, Citroen has revealed plans to launch a plastic bodied all-electric four-seat cabriolet called the E-Mйhari. Born out of a partnership with France’s Bollorй Group, the new car will be made at the Rennes factory in Northern France and go on sale next Spring. However, there are no plans to sell it here in the UK, with France the main target audience where there are tax breaks and incentives for these kinds of vehicles. The E-Mйhari has a top speed of 68mph, with a maximum range of approximately 125 miles. Charging takes up to 13 hours using a domestic plug socket, and because the battery pack utilises Lithium Metal Polymer (LMP) technology and are classed as ‘dry’ batteries, they aren’t weather sensitive and don’t have the range fluctuation that many modern electric cars suffer with during harsher weather conditions.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
  • Aprilia RSV4 R-FW.

    For those who think good just isn’t good enough, Aprilia has released more information on a “Factory Works” program that will enable riders or teams to buy an RSV4 built by the manufacturer’s racing department. While the program is primarily intended to keep Aprilia’s RSV4 on race grids around the world, it is also a chance for (very) serious trackday enthusiasts or collectors to stake their claim on Aprilia Racing Division’s years of hard work and development…for a price, of course. No word just yet on what that price will be, though Aprilia did confirm that the RSV4 R-FW will be made available in five packages (each varying in terms of specification for engine and electronics), with the top packages featuring special electronics systems and an engine with upward of 230 hp. More information at serviceaprilia.com/public/racing.
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