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Lister Jaguar

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Lister Jaguar - information: Lister Jaguar is a very good car, that was released by "Lister" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Lister Jaguar on this page.

Brand Name Lister
Model Lister Jaguar
Number of views 73268 views
Model's Rate 8.3 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • PEUGEOT news.

    With stop-start technology being removed from Peugeot’s 2008 BlueHDi 100 models, CO2 emissions rise from 95 to 98g/km, while fuel economy drops to 76.3mpg where previously it was 78.5mpg. Despite the removal of the stop-start system, prices are still the same with the 2008 Active 1.6 BlueHDi 100 costing Ј16,545 and the topspec Feline edition priced at Ј19,445.
  • Suzuki SX4 S-Cross 1.6 DDiS Automatic.

    Suzuki’s SX4 S-Cross has been around for a couple of years and has earned a quiet following for blending a practical interior with a certain amount of driving flair, all at a reasonable price. What it’s never had, and no Suzuki for the last 22 years has had, is an automatic gearbox allied with a diesel engine, or at least a proper one rather than a continuously variable transmission. This combination accounts for 16 per cent of sales in the compact SUV market, so Suzuki is keen to tap in to that extra revenue stream by launching an automatic gearbox option for the existing diesel engine. The gearbox uses a twin-clutch setup to engage odd or even gears in advance, depending on whether the driver is accelerating or braking, ensuring a smooth and instantaneous shift of the next required gear. In use it operates exactly as you would expect an automatic gearbox to work, although it’s technically an automated manual system - hydraulics control the clutch and gearshift in the background, leaving you with nothing to do but play with the steering wheel mounted paddles, should you wish to take over control yourself. Systems of this nature are often a tad rough, but Suzuki’s version is remarkably smooth. Each gear is selected without fuss, and there’s no clunking through the system as the clutch is engaged. It’s not notably quick, despite the claims of instant shifting, but the short pause between ratios would only be a problem if this SUV was a more sporting proposition. Not that the S-Cross can’t handle bends. It can, and probably better than you have any right to expect, but it’s never particularly involving or rewarding. Allgrip four-wheel-drive is standard on this edition, with the electronic gadgetry splitting the power between each wheel, and allowing you to get further in tricky conditions than a conventional two-wheel-drive SUV will allow you. Driving to the top of Ben Nevis might be beyond it, due to ground clearance issues, but you’ll certainly make it home when the snow starts falling. The extra weight of the gearbox hits economy slightly, with a meagre 1.4mpg drop compared to the manual version, but the end result is a still an impressive 62.8mpg on the combined cycle. And that doesn’t appear to be an entirely unrealistic figure either, with 50+mpg in normal use being easily achievable while on test. There’s no extra weight on the inside, with disappointingly lightweight plastics making up the bland, but inoffensive dashboard. And with a long list of standard equipment included within the price, there’s not a shortage of space for the driver to enjoy all of the functions. The S-Cross feels light and airy inside, at least up front, but it gets a bit tighter for headroom in the rear. The boot is class competitive, swallowing exactly the same 430 litres of luggage as Nissan’s Qashqai, and is similarly comparable to SsangYong’s new Tivoli. The SX4 S-Cross comes loaded with equipment, offers excellent real-world economy and has the extra traction and reassurance afforded by four-wheeldrive. It might not be the most exciting model in the segment, or even the class leader, but it offers excellent value for money in a generally pleasing package.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
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