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Locomobile Steamer

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Locomobile Steamer - information: Locomobile Steamer is a very good car, that was released by "Locomobile" company. We collected the best 6 photos of Locomobile Steamer on this page.

Brand Name Locomobile
Model Locomobile Steamer
Number of views 42158 views
Model's Rate 8.1 out of 10
Number of images 6 images
Interesting News
  • RECREATING HISTORY.

    A stunningMoto Guzzi V8 works racer replica looks certain to steal the show at Coys sale at theMCNLondonMotorcycle Show at Excel on February 13. The bike was built in the early 2000s by ex-factory technicians with access to original drawings and spares to use as patterns to make new components. Coys haven’t provided an estimate but, with only two original V8 racers existing, the parade-ready replica should attract a three-figure sum. Other bikes from the same Italian collection to be offered at Excel include a gorgeous 1957 Ducati 125cc Bialbero racer (estimate ?65,000-70,000), a rare 1955 100cc Cecatto Bialbero racer (?29,000-35,000), a 1938 250cc Benelli Bialbero race bike (?48,000-52,000) and a 1931 1300cc Indian Type 402 four, fully restored in 2010 with minimal mileage since (?55,000-65,000). Entries for the capital’s only motorcycle-only sale scheduled for 2016 are still open and the catalogue - which will be available on January 25 - closes on January 19. Entry fees are ?350 per bike and buyers’ and sellers’ commission is set at 10% plus VAT. Over 100 lots are promised for the sale, which starts at 2.30pm on Saturday February 13 (viewing from February 12). Potential vendors contact Anthony Godin (07854 213928 or 0208 614 7888).
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
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