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Marcopolo Senior GV

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Marcopolo Senior GV - information: Marcopolo Senior GV is a very good car, that was released by "Marcopolo" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Marcopolo Senior GV on this page.

Brand Name Marcopolo
Model Marcopolo Senior GV
Number of views 103561 views
Model's Rate 7.1 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
  • NEW 2016 KAWASAKI ZX-10R.

    With World Superbike regulations becoming ever stricter with regard to modifications, manufacturers have to make sure their production models already have the proper pieces in place. And after winning two World Superbike championships in the past three years, Kawasaki shows that it’s serious about staying at the top of the superbike heap with its all-new 2016 ZX-10R. All of the extensive updates to Team Green’s new literbike were gleaned from lessons learned in WSBK competition and intended to make sure the factory team has a solid base to start from for the coming season. Engine Other than the previous engine’s bore and stroke, there’s little carried over between the old and new ZX-10R. The new crankshaft is lighter for quicker response and improved handling, with a correspondingly lighter balance shaft and rod journals that have a new coating for reduced friction at higher rpm. New 5-gram-lighter pistons, cams with more overlap, and a new airbox (25 percent more volume and air filter with 60 percent more surface area for better fl ow) work with an all-new cylinder head featuring reworked and polished intake and exhaust ports (previously only the intake ports were polished) plus revised combustion chambers. The titanium exhaust valves increase in size 1mm to 25.5mm, and cylinder-wall thickness was increased slightly for a more rigid engine block. The titanium alloy headers use a new heat-resistant alloy that allows thinner wall thickness for reduced weight, and the titanium exhaust canister has 50 percent more volume for better fl ow without increased sound levels. The intake portion of the frame’s steering head was modified to quell intake honk, allowing some freedom in the exhaust for more power without exceeding strict noise restrictions. The transmission remains a racing-style cassette design for quick and easy internal gearing changes. Gear ratios are closer for track use, with shorter ratios in all but first gear. The slipper clutch is 130 grams lighter, and some of the gears have dry-film lubricant coating to reduce friction. A contactless- sensor-equipped quickshifter similar to the H2R is standard, with the optional Kawasaki race ECU offering clutchless downshifts as well. Electronics The new ZX-10R utilizes a Bosch five-axis IMU with software developed in-house at Kawasaki that allows the unit to calculate yaw rate from other sensors, resulting in six-axis operation. This allows the IMU to sense changes in pavement elevation, camber, and the motorcycle’s position relative to them, as well as discern different tire profiles so that the bike is not restricted to just the OEM tires. The Sport-Kawasaki TRaction Control (S-KTRC) system now has five modes of operation instead of three as with the previous ZX-10R. Modes 1 and 2 are designed for racing, while mode 3 is for a “dry circuit with highgrip tires,” mode 4 is for “dry canyon roads or commuting,” and mode 5 is intended for wet pavement use. The Keihin 47mm throttle bodies utilize an electronic ride-by-wire throttle system to control power in addition to ignition retardation. With the Bosch IMU, Kawasaki was able to produce its own version of the cornering ABS that has seen usage on KTM and BMW motorcycles. Kawasaki’s system is called Cornering Management Function and changes braking pressure according to the bike’s lean and pitch angles to prevent it from standing up under braking in a corner. Another new addition is the Kawasaki Launch Control Mode (KLCM), with three modes available. And Kawasaki Engine Braking Control-first seen on the supercharged H2R-manages engine back-torque. Lastly, there are three selectable power modes for the new ZX-10R: Full, Middle (providing approximately 80 percent power), or Low (allowing 60 percent power). Chassis The new Ninja’s frame has also been redone, with the steering head moved rearward 7.5mm closer to the rider, while the swingarm has been lengthened 15.8mm (in addition to extra bracing for more torsional rigidity), resulting in more front weight bias. Wheelbase is now listed as 56.7 inches, almost a half inch longer than its predecessor. An all-new Showa Balance Free Fork featuring an external damping valve chamber utilizes a design similar to the ?hlins TTX/FGR concept, with the rebound and compression damping valves completely separated so that the oil only flows in one direction through the valves; in conjunction with nitrogen pressurization in the damping chamber, this keeps the pressure on both sides of the valves as consistent as possible, drastically reducing cavitation that results in inconsistent damping. The rear Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion (BFRC) shock uses the same concept in its damping valves, and the shock linkage has been revised to allow a broader range of adjustment. Brakes have also been fully upgraded, with Brembo M50 monoblock aluminum calipers with 30mm pistons biting on huge 330mm discs for awesome stopping power. A Brembo radial-action master cylinder equipped with steel-braided brake lines ensures positive and responsive feel at the lever as well as better consistency. Wheels are one of the few components that haven’t been changed, though they are now shod with Bridgestone RS10 street/track rubber in 120/70-17 front and 190/55-17 rear sizes. Bodywork has undergone some restyling, with the windscreen improved for better aerodynamics. Overall weight is claimed at 450 pounds wet with all fluids and a full tank of fuel for the non-ABS model, 454 pounds wet for the ABS model. List prices are $14,999 for the standard ZX-10R, $15,299 for the Special Edition paint, $15,999 for the ZX-10R ABS model, and $16,299 for the ZX-10R ABS with Special Edition paint scheme. How will all of these changes affect Kawasaki’s performance in World Superbike and on the showroom floor? We can’t wait to find out.
  • CUSHIONING THE RIDE.

    Citroen and Britain go back a long way. Early Citroens were first sold here just after the first World War, from 1919. They quickly endeared themselves to UK drivers, and by 1923 there were already over 23,000 of the cars on British roads. Then, for almost 40 years, from 1926 until 1965, British-made Citroens were produced in a factory in Slough. We Brits are still major consumers of Citroen products, as the third largest market in the world for the cars, behind only China, and Citroen’s native France. There is another very strong Anglo-French link. For the past 18 months, Citroen’s global boss has been a British chief executive, who also happens to be one of the most senior women in the motor industry worldwide. Linda Jackson, former managing director of Citroen UK, runs the company from its Paris base and is shaping its future with some radical plans. Briefly back in Britain on a day trip via Eurostar, she revealed her strategy for driving the company forward and restoring some of its past glory. This is, after all, the brand with some very notable models in its 96-year history, such as the pioneering Traction Avant, the unforgettable 2CV, and the remarkable Ami 6. Citroens used to be known for their quirkiness, a characteristic that had evaporated in a couple of generations of rather bland models, but has recently been revived in the much more characterful Citroen C4 Cactus, with its distinctive body-protecting airbumps. Initial plans to build 70,000 units a year has proved overly modest, and current C4 Cactus production is running at 110,000 per annum. So can we expect more of the same in future models? Yes, says Linda Jackson. Although it is hard to quantify within a largely French-speaking company, as there is no direct translation in French for the word quirky. “The success of the C4 Cactus shows you can have a vehicle that stands out and be successful with it,” comments Linda. “We have never been successful when we try to be like everyone else. It’s a gamble to be quirky, but it’s what we are doing.” Something else for which Citroen has traditionally been known is the magic carpet ride quality of its famed hydropneumatic suspension, although more recently a hydraulic system on the current C5 has sought to deliver a modern version of cushioning ride comfort. But now Citroen is on the brink of revealing a revolutionary new suspension system that Linda says will be exclusive to the French firm, and will eventually become standard right across the range. It will appear on the first new model in 2017. For the moment she is a bit cagey about the specifics, whether it will be a self-levelling design, or some kind of air suspension system, but she promises it will take Citroen back to its roots of admirable ‘floating’ ride comfort, while maintaining good body control for handling precision. “Comfort is a core value of the Citroen brand, and this is our way to recreate the benefits of the hydropneumatic set-up in a more modern, more appropriate way,” she told us. Meanwhile, she is busy with bold plans to slim the Citroen range from its current 14 different body styles to a more rational seven core designs based around three platforms. It’s intended to make the brand both leaner and fitter, and also better structured for customers to appreciate what Citroen is about. So how does a British boss go down in an iconic French company? Pretty well so far. A clear direction and plans to resurrect some of what made past Citroens special is winning her respect. They’re even quite kind about her A-level-based ability to speak French. “They say I have an accent like Jane Birkin,” says an amused Linda.
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