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Maruti 800 DX MPFI

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Maruti 800 DX MPFI - information: Maruti 800 DX MPFI is a very good car, that was released by "Maruti" company. We collected the best 7 photos of Maruti 800 DX MPFI on this page.

Brand Name Maruti
Model Maruti 800 DX MPFI
Number of views 28121 views
Model's Rate 7.7 out of 10
Number of images 7 images
Interesting News
  • SCRAMBLER CLASSIC.

    Ducati’s new Scrambler range is a trip down memory lane. A modern tribute to the care-free, halcyon days of the original Scrambler, which was born in 1962. Born free, in fact, as is engraved on the fuel cap. Sweet touches like that bring a smile to my face and encourage me to mentally unshackle from the putrid and mayhem filled realities of the so-called modern world. The Scrambler Classic is the machine to do it on. So easy to ride. Easy on the eye. Comfortable. Inspiring in a fashion that is not bent towards velocity. You don’t have to try and be fast on one. Just take it easy, dude, enjoy the ride and pass it on. The new Scrambler has an extra cylinder and a fair bit more capacity over its distant predecessor, using the reliable and effervescent 803cc air-cooled Desmo two-valve engine. The motor yields an excellent mix of easily accessible power and consistent torque that is further bolstered by well matched gearbox ratios. The bike is ultra-narrow and low in the seat, and all controls are easy to use and light to the touch, making it an attractive prospect to whatever your gender. With a slight weight of 170kg to lug, the Scrambler is certainly a zesty little number, but not intimidating. That’s what its all about, man. The diamond stitched and suitably well-used couch brown seat, spoked wheels, brushed aluminium tank covers and cow-horn ‘bars scream vintage and do a good job of hiding the machine’s actual modernity. If you look more closely there are other nice touches, like the aluminium guards, machined engine covers and tidy exhaust plumbing. It is touted as a fashion and lifestyle statement, again like its daddy, and is effective in this regard. Ducati know this, of course, and have an entire wardrobe available pour femme et homme. Handling is pretty darn good. The 18in front and relatively high profile tyres tend to slow direction changes, but this is well compensated by the handlebars, light weight and general rider ergonomics. It’s a willing performer in the curves too, with good clearance and confident corner tracking. The relatively soft suspension is not complex and provides decent stroke for absorbing corrugations. The overall comfort helps alleviate some of the effects of “hanging out in the wind” a bit, too. Brakes, which feature the miracle of ABS and “radial” caliper mounting, are effective but feel wooden, like old Brembos do. The dash is suitably sparse, but a disappointment - there is nothing analogue in it and it is not easily read, which is a shame. But in keeping with the peace, love and good happiness stuff theme, I can forgive and even forget. Overall, the Scrambler is a great little machine that is rewarding as much as it is pleasing to ride. Just hop on and go - it’s that easy. It is destined to be a hit with many people seeking a bike that is functional and places the rider in a more restful universe.
  • Life in the old dog yet....

    It might not be as light on its feet as its newer rivals, but Yam’s smooth, secure, comfy FJR1300 is still a valid tourer. Updates a couple of years back - multi-function dash, flashy finish, better suspension, high-tech options - added class, and for ’16 there’s more refinement. It’s got a six-speed gearbox at last, for both better acceleration and more relaxed cruising, plus an ‘assist and slipper’ clutch based on the R1’s system. Got LED lights too and a matt silver paint option, plus AE/AS versions have cornering lights.
  • DS 4.

    Little more than a year after Citroen announced that it would be spinning off its DS cars into a separate luxury subbrand, the French firm has facelifted half of its line-up, with both the DS 4 and flagship DS 5 sporting the company’s new corporate nose treatment. The rest of the range, namely the DS 3 supermini and Cabrio, will get an update within weeks, adopting a similarly bold front end that will also see the end of the double chevrons adorning the car, as has been done with the DS 4 and DS 5. While the UK is the biggest single market for the DS 3, there’s still some work to be done on the rest of the range, but the newly formed firm is hoping that revisions to the DS 4, including a realignment of its market positioning will transform sales. DS Automobiles is looking to attract two different sets of buyers for the newly revised DS 4, with the regular DS 4 riding lower compared to before, while the new Crossback model is aimed at the crossover market thanks to its raised ride height of 30 millimetres, and more rugged, off-road inspired styling cues. At the car’s international launch a couple of months ago, we focused upon the DS 4 Crossback edition, but now with the first examples arriving in UK showrooms, we were able to spend time behind the wheel of the DS 4 Prestige, paired to the flagship 178bhp BlueHDi engine. One of the biggest criticisms of the outgoing DS 4 was its unyielding ride and we’re pleased to say that ride comfort has been transformed on the new car. Deep ruts and potholes are tackled with ease, and there’s no need to brace yourself like you needed to do with the old car. Steering feel is particularly agile with lots of feel, with the DS 4 asserting itself as being different from the humdrum hatchback segment. Through the bends there’s minimal body lean and a decent amount of grip, inspiring confidence in more challenging corners. While it doesn’t offer the same kind of driver satisfaction as Ford’s Focus, there’s reasonable agility and the experience is reassuringly safe and predictable. The engine is quiet and refined, only becoming heard when you really gun the right hand pedal, and while there’s a fair amount of road noise on noisier surfaces, wind noise isn’t intrusive. Away from the lights there’s decent pace, with smooth gearshifts from the six-speed automatic transmission. The brakes deliver good bite, though beware if you have anything larger than average sized feet, as the space in the foot well is at a premium. There’s very little room between the centre console and the clutch pedal on manual gearbox variants, and it’s all too easy to get your size tens stuck uncomfortably, and then there’s a mad scramble to get the clutch down in time for you to stop. It’s a good reason why you’re better off opting for the automatic variants in preference to the manual versions. Apart from revisions to the dashboard to incorporate a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, and the first time that Apple CarPlay has been seen in a PSA Peugeot-Citroen-DS product, it’s business as usual. So that means a nicely appointed cabin with surfaces that are a cut above the norm in the medium car segment. The trademark DS watchstrap-inspired leather upholstery is on offer and looks sensational. There’s squidgy materials used for the dashboard, but disappointingly the door tops are hard plastic unless you opt for the uprated leather trim. The instruments where you can change the backlighting are a nice touch, and all of the controls are neatly positioned up high for ease of use. You’ll need to be a contortionist to use the USB socket, or have small hands, though, because it’s awkwardly positioned on the centre console. And that’s particularly disappointing as the use of Apple’s CarPlay depends on you being able to plug in your iPhone via the USB socket. The newly introduced touchscreen is easy to use and nicely positioned just within your field of vision. While it isn’t the most responsive system around, it’s certainly no better or worse than some rival systems. Our test car came equipped with the distinctive watchstrap upholstery and comfort and lateral support is simply excellent. It’s also easy to adjust the seats to gain a good position, though the steering wheel always feels like it is positioned too close. Space up front is pretty good, apart from the aforementioned pedal problems, while at the rear there’s surprisingly more space than you expect. Once installed in the back, knee and headroom is actually alright, though it can be a bit of challenge to get in and out. Those shapely styled rear doors come to a point, and if you’re not careful you could do someone a mischief. Space around the cabin for oddments is generally good, with a decent-sized tray in front of the gear lever and well-proportioned door pockets. While vision out of the front of the car is good, thick rear pillars and a shallow rear window make manoeuvring more of a challenge. It’s therefore pleasing that all DS 4s come with rear parking sensors for added reassurance. Boot space is well proportioned at 385 litres, though you’ll have to get over the high sill first. The optional Denon audio system restricts space a little, but the seats are easy to fold down with the pull of a lever. With the launch of the new DS 4, prices have increased a notch due to realignment of the model range. Where the previous DSign model offered an attractive entry price to DS 4 ownership, it wasn’t particularly well equipped, something you can’t level at all models of this latest DS 4 range. For instance, all versions come with DAB digital radio, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, dual-zone climate control, rear privacy glass, cruise control and automatic headlights and wipers.
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