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Massey Ferguson 133

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Massey Ferguson 133 - information: Massey Ferguson 133 is a very good car, that was released by "Massey Ferguson" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Massey Ferguson 133 on this page.

Brand Name Massey Ferguson
Model Massey Ferguson 133
Number of views 23196 views
Model's Rate 8.8 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • DUCATI MULTISTRADAS.

    When I had a chance to try out the Ducati Multistrada Pikes Peak last year I was incredibly impressed, the concept of four bikes in one is bandied about quite commonly when referring to the Multistrada and is a good reflection of the bike’s abilties. The current Multistrada is a large bike with a wet weight of 235kg - relatively light all things considered. I found the seat height tall, although it is adjustable between 825 and 845mm and couldn’t get both feet flat to the ground, but balance and low speed maneuvering were both very good. Heated grips of a chilly morning are priceless and the centre-stand is a nice touch, although probably not for everyone. They are part of the Touring pack which includes heated grips, panniers and center-stand. The Multistrada S benefits from the Ducati Skyhook Suspension and also includes a few nifty additional features like full LED headlamps, including the Ducati Cornering Lights (DCL). The braking systems on the S is also an upgraded Superbike spec system, with M50 Brembo front calipers on 330mm rotors, with a dual piston Brembo rear caliper on 265mm rotor. Also standard is the Ducati Multimedia System, which uses Bluetooth to accept incoming calls, alert you to messages and control your music, when synced with your other devices, displayed via the S’s full colour TFT display. On the bike, performance from the DVT Testastretta starts low and tractor-like, with strong but controllable low end-torque, and between 4000 and 5000rpm transforms into sportsbike like drive - in fact if you want to move off in a hurry try opening that throttle wide open, it’s exhilarating. Just keep the revs up past 4000rpm where it transitions into much smoother running, with slight vibes felt through the ‘bars, but not in an annoying fashion - you’ll have all the torque you could wish for, for rapid overtaking or acceleration. You can also modify each of the riding modes for a variety of settings, where I was using the baseline settings, which means you can have each mode set up for specific conditions, whether that’s suspension, power delivery, ABS, DTC or DWC. The Skyhook Suspension was a standout and in Sport mode with one helmet (the one rider, no luggage setting) I could feel the forks providing more support during heavy braking, only to soften as I came to a stop. Through the local twisties the Skyhook suspension proved itself, with an ability to easily absorb road irregularities. Coming into corners needs more effort than your regular sportsbike, with the Multistrada obviously carrying its weight taller and taking more input to follow your chosen path. It wasn’t the sharpest on tip in, with the standard settings - but that’s something you can tweak thanks to the level of adjustability on offer. The taller bike also means you’re leaning over further, which was easy and confidence inspiring but lends itself to coming into your corners nice and wide.You can feel that you’re relying on a system of suspension that essentially has a mind of its own but as you get used to that fact and show more confidence in the bike it only gets better and better. Part of what sets the newest Skyhook Suspension (DSS) system apart is the Evo suffix, with the previous sensors now joined by the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which is used to provide cornering ABS to the Brembo braking system with Bosch 9ME ABS unit. This means the DSS Evo system is able to take into account your lean angle when calculating the ideal suspension response. It’s high tech and the results on the road speak for themselves. I was hoping to take my wife for a ride as a pillion to get an opinion on riding two-up, but with all my testing mid-week unfortunately couldn’t make it happen. Now it’s quite possibly you’re thinking to yourself, why spend the extra $4000 on the S model, which is a fair question. The S is the obvious choice though, as the Multistrada truly is many bikes in one, with the S offering the ultimate in suspension adjustability at the click of a few buttons. It’s the future of motorcycling and Ducati’s leading the charge.
  • Exemplary Explorers.

    Triumph have updated their largest adventure bike, and like the Tiger 800 there are now two types: the cast-wheel tarmac-biased Explorer XR, and the spoke-wheel trail-ready Explorer XC. The basic version of each bike is pretty much as before. So that’s a luxurious and syrupy 1215cc ride-by-wire inline three, bolted into a substantial chassis with single-sided swimgarm and shaft drive. Suspension is now supplied by WP, however, and the front brakes are one-piece radial Brembos. There are two riding modes, road and rain, each with their own throttle maps and specific settings for the standard-fit traction control and ABS. The classy dash is also new, switchgear is refined, and the screen now moves at the touch of a button. Yes, it’s electric. That’s a class first, you know. As with the smaller Tigers there are flashier variants too. The Explorer XRx and XCx feature an additional off-road mode with its own settings. Better than that, they also have leanangle sensitive traction control and cornering ABS. That’s right - you can go full gas or grab the lever mid-corner, and a little black box squares the job up. The XRx and XCx also benefit from WP’s semi-active suspension, with preset ride options, continually-tweaked damping and rear preload that sets itself automatically. Heated grips, too. There’s more. Go for the touring-biased XRT or round-the-globe XCA, and the revised Explorer also gets a sportmode, a rider configurablemode, hill start control, heated seats and a taller screen. In terms of high-tech-spec, this puts the big Brit right up there with the KTM 1290 Super Adventure and a BMW R1200GSwithall the factory-fit options.
  • 2017 SUZUKI GSX-R1000 CONCEPT.

    Racers and sportbike riders have been waiting impatiently for several years now for an updated Suzuki literbike, but the end is in sight: At the EICMA show last November, the company finally unveiled a new GSX-R1000. But while the new bike was labeled as a 2017 model, it was also called a “concept,” indicating there may still be work to be completed before it reaches production. Suzuki says that the goal for the new bike was to create the “most powerful, hardest-accelerating, cleanest-running GSX-R ever built,” and the “lightest, most aerodynamic, and best-handling GSX-R1000 ever.” To that end, the bike benefits from lessons learned from the GSX-RR MotoGP project. Specifically, the GSX-R uses what Suzuki refers to as a “Broad Power System,” intended to maximize top-end power without sacrificing low-end and midrange torque via four new features: variable valve timing, valves operated by finger followers, top-feed fuel injectors, and dual SET valves in the exhaust headers. Suzuki’s Variable Valve Timing System utilizes a ball-and-groove arrangement on the intake camshaft, activated by centrifugal force stacking the balls in different grooves. As rpm increases, the intake cam is retarded, optimizing cam timing over the rpm range. The new valve train also uses a finger follower setup to improve valve control and reduce moving mass in the top end, allowing increased valve lift and higher peak rpm. The top-feed fuel injectors are located in the airbox (they were previously mounted in the throttle bodies) to better atomize the fuel for more top-end power, again without sacrificing low-rpm output. And the final part of the Broad Power System is Suzuki Exhaust Tuning-Alpha, which utilizes a butterfl y valve between the number one and four exhaust headers and another between the number two and three headers. The valves remain closed at lower rpm to enhance torque and open at higher rpm for more power. Another goal for the engine was to “optimize dimensions to enhance cornering performance” as well as make the chassis as compact as possible. The frame is all new and has revised geometry, though again no numbers were given. Suspension consists of a Showa Balance Free Fork and Balance Free Rear Cushion shock very similar to those used on the 2016 Kawasaki ZX-10R; the fork has external nitrogen-charged oil reservoirs and external damping circuits, and the shock is Showa’s latest iteration of the BFRC and is significantly lighter. Other chassis updates include high-volume intake ducts, a lower top and sleeker design for the fuel tank, and more aerodynamic bodywork. Even the fairing mounting bolts have been redesigned, with a new fl at-top shape to reduce air resistance, with other mounting hardware recessed to prevent turbulence. No mention was made of the new GSX-R’s brakes aside from the use of electronic ABS, but the calipers are very similar to the previous model’s Brembo four-pot monoblock units. The rotors, however, appear to be a variant of Brembo’s T-drive discs, with half the traditional buttons replaced by T-shaped pins. According to Brembo, the assembly system transfers braking force more effectively, is lighter, and has greater resistance to thermo-mechanical stress. A single-valve ride-by-wire throttle assembly replaces the old model’s dual-valve setup, and the electronics package now features a 10-level traction control system, three power modes, a quickshifter that works on upshifts as well as downshifts, and launch control. The press material contains no mention of an IMU as part of the electronics package; in this regard the GSX-R may be a step behind the YZF-R1 and new ZX-10R, but this is one aspect that could very well change before the bike reaches production. No word was given on price or availability for the new model, but with race teams the world over clamoring for the updated platform, it’s a safe bet the new bike will be a very-early-release 2017 model.
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