World Encyclopedia of Cars
The best old cars, news and reviews about old cars. Stay in touch!

Maudslay Maharanee

All Maudslay Photos

Maudslay Maharanee - information: Maudslay Maharanee is a very good car, that was released by "Maudslay" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Maudslay Maharanee on this page.

Brand Name Maudslay
Model Maudslay Maharanee
Number of views 114931 views
Model's Rate 6.8 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • Porsche North America Racing achieve podiums at Daytona.

    Porsche North America Racing started the 2016 WeatherTech United SportsCar Championship with a third place finish in the GTLM class at the 54th Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona. The no.912 Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber, Frйdйric Makowiecki and Michael Christensen battled through an unusually attritional race to take the final step on the podium, although it was nearly so much more for the factory Porsche squad. A wet qualifying session on the Thursday, disrupted by torrential rain, saw the no.911 and no.912 Porsches lock out the front row of the grid in the hands of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki respectively. Such was the GTLM field’s dominance in the wet, the two 911 RSRs actually set the fastest times overall but, thanks to IMSA’s rules, would be forced to start behind the prototype machinery. During the race’s opening hour, Tandy (as is now becoming customary in the USCC) raced into an early lead as the no.912 dropped back into a dogfight with the works Corvettes and BMWs. By the six-hour mark, the two factory Porsches crossed the line onetwo, with the no.911 still narrowly leading. However, through the night - heavily disrupted by multiple full-course caution periods - the momentum swung toward the no. 912 RSR. By dawn, the 54th Rolex 24 had boiled down to a battle between the two Porsches and the no.3 and no.4 Corvette duo. But, with Kйvin Estre at the wheel, the no.911 slowed dramatically on the banking with around five hours to go, a broken driveshaft forcing a lengthy stop for repairs leaving the no.912 to battle on alone. Patrick Pilet would eventually re-emerge in the 2015 championship-winning entry to help it on its way to some useful points in eighth place. After the final round of stops inside the last hour, Bamber found himself once again in the class lead. However, after being hunted down by Oliver Gavin in the no.4 Corvette, the Kiwi racer was nudged out of the lead at the turn five hairpin. With around 20 minutes remaining, the second Chevrolet - in the hands of Antonio Garcia - also found a way through, this time at the Bus Stop chicane, leaving Bamber to watch on as the two Corvettes fought it out for victory. Despite coming close, the two GM cars never came to blows, as Bamber brought the no.912 machine home in third for the crew’s first podium since ViR last August.
  • China the key to Avista’s future.

    THE future of Buick’s gorgeous Avista concept - and a Holdenbadged version - lies in two extra doors, according to General Motors insiders Wheels spoke to following the car’s Detroit motor show debut. Sources confirmed that a model of a four-door version exists in the GM styling studio and is under serious consideration following its overwhelmingly positive reaction as the star of the show. GM has started work on making a business case for building the car, and a Holden-badged version - including a higher-output HSV model - could be in the mix. GM sources hint the production Avista would likely end up being a four-door coupe designed as a more affordable rival to the Mercedes-Benz CLS, BMW 6 Series Gran Coupe and Audi A7 Sportback. While Buick last year showed off a four-door concept - the Australian-designed Avenir - the four-door Avista coupe would be smaller and sleeker, with more emphasis on proportions and design than rear seat space. The challenge for securing an Avista business case is ensuring enough global demand, and once again right-hand drive production is the big question mark. In the global automotive game, Buick (which sells only in China and North America) tends to fly under the radar. But with sales of 1.25 million vehicles last year - the highest in Buick’s 112 years - it is GM’s second best-selling brand worldwide after Chevrolet. Put that down to China, where it’s the country’s number two brand. China accounts for about 80 percent of total Buick sales, and therefore holds the key to any decision to produce Avista. Although Chinese consumers do not currently buy coupes in significant numbers, Buick and GMC vice-president Duncan Aldred doesn’t necessarily see that as a roadblock to Avista getting the green light for production. “I think we’ve earned the right to have the halo car in the Buick range,” Aldred says. “We’re the premium mainstream brand in China, and there’s great value in us continuing to stretch the brand upwards, even though it may not be massive volume.” “China is important to any Buick,” admits GM design chief Ed Welburn, who says GM’s Chinese product planners have seen the car. While China is now a massive SUV market, Welburn makes the point that Chinese consumers suddenly switched from buying sedans three years ago. “A coupe might be the next big thing.” The Avista concept is based on a mash-up of GM Alpha and Omega components, sharing the Alpha-based Chevrolet Camaro coupe’s 2811mm wheelbase and with nearly identical front and rear tracks. Under the bonnet is a 3.0-litre V6 driving the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. It’s the same engine used in the Cadillac CT6. “It’s buildable,” says Cadillac chief engineer Dave Leone. “The business case is the issue.” What helps the business case is that the production version would be built using GM’s Alpha architecture, which underpins Cadillac’s ATS and CTS as well as Camaro. Alpha means the car would not only share components that are already produced in volume, but a number of different variants of the car could also easily be configured. The Avista’s engine bay, for example, will accept GM’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four, and while the 6.2-litre V8 can also be fitted into Alpha, sources say the Avista’s underbonnet layout has not been protected for the larger engine. The eight-speed auto can be swapped for a six-speed manual, and it can be built with all-wheel drive as well as rear-drive. Importantly, it can be built in right-hand drive. That means GM could easily build Opel, Vauxhall and Holden versions of the car, offering powertrains that suit each market, along with different equipment levels and different chassis set-ups. “Think of all the performance hardware in the parts bin,” teases Welburn. An HSV Avista with all-wheel drive and the 346kW, twin-turbo 3.6-litre V6 from the Cadillac ATS-V? It’s possible. “That’s just a good business model,” says Aldred of selling Avista as an Opel. “If you can build a vehicle that’s competing in Europe, North America and China, you’ve pretty much got it covered.” And what about Holden? “Holden’s in the mix,” confirms Aldred, a Brit who was managing director of Vauxhall before taking on the Buick/GMC job, so knows GM’s Australian subsidiary well. “We could do right-hand drive. That investment’s done, though there is an additional expense. I guess you’ve gotta see if there is enough volume in the UK with Vauxhall.” Avista has a lot of enthusiastic supporters inside GM. “It’s gorgeous,” gushed GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “I said to Mark [Reuss], ‘We have to find a way of doing this one’.” Lower sales expectations and premium margins mean a fourdoor coupe is perhaps a safer choice as a Buick halo car than a large sedan like the Avenir, which would have had to compete with everything from an S-Class Benz to Hyundai’s new Genesis G90. Even so, GM product planners are wary of committing investment dollars to this notoriously fickle segment. And that’s why there’s a strong faction inside GM that wants to stretch Avista’s wheelbase slightly and add a couple of doors.
  • Audi’s electrified future.

    The introduction of mild hybrids to Audi’s model range is set to edge efficiency ever closer to the kind of economy figures enjoyed by TDI owners. But it doesn’t mean the death of the diesel engine, as the introduction of cutting edge technology can be paired to both TDI diesel and TFSI petrol engines. Audi says that within ten years, its entire model range will feature the technology. The key elements of the new system are an 11 Ah capacity lithium-ion battery pack and belt starter generator, with the latter replacing the current starter motor. Coasting becomes possible from around 9mph upwards, so that if the driver takes their foot off the accelerator, the car will coast along for a short time with the engine off, saving fuel. It’s possible to recuperate up to 5kW (7bhp), with the generator returning that power, reducing fuel usage and boosting economy as a result. And while this system can be integrated into current 12-volt systems, Audi is on the verge of announcing that it will put a new 48-volt system into production, with a capacity of harnessing 12kW (16bhp), that will allow coasting for up to 30 seconds, delivering even better efficiency compared to the 12-volt system. The company first gave a glimpse at the technology in the Prologue Concept car last year at the Los Angeles motor show. Other benefits of the introduction of a 48-volt electrical system includes the ability to have much smaller cable cross sections, reducing the weight of the wiring harness, and because it has four times the power, there’s opportunities to add additional innovative technology for the suspension and drivetrain. Further into the future, Audi’s engineers plan to convert the auxiliary systems, like pumps, superchargers for the engine, transmission and air conditioning system to 48 volts. Today these are driven hydraulically or by the engine, but in the future they will be powered by electricity and lighter and more compact. Audi will soon announce an electromechanical active roll stabilisation system, which features an electric motor and a three-stage planetary gearbox that separates the two halves of the stabiliser from each other. For relaxed and comfortable driving, the two halves are decoupled, resulting in cossetting ride comfort. For the sportier driver, the tubes are interconnected and twist against each other, delivering a tauter, more dynamic ride, and less roll when cornering. The front and rear stabilisers can also be adjusted independently allowing even greater degrees of fine tuning. The system is also capable of harnessing energy, and the motor can act as a generator, converting it to electrical energy. But Audi’s engineers are already looking at a second, more advanced project using the 48-volt setup, though it is still in the very early prototype stage. Being developed under the working title of eROT, an electromechanical rotary damper replaces today’s hydraulic item. The system isn’t too far apart from the active roll stabilisation arrangement in terms of basic principles, but a strong lever arm absorbs all of the forces that occur on a bumpy road, and via a series of gears, the force is transmitted into an electric motor, which then converts it to electricity. Recuperation is, on average, around 150 watts on an average road, with a freshly resurfaced road generating as little as 3 watts, while a badly maintained country lane may generate as much as 613 watts. Over a cross section of different roads, CO2 emissions savings could be as much as 3g/ km or four to five mpg.
Top Maudslay models
Popular Searches
World Encyclopedia of Cars
Copyright 2015. All rights under protection.